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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The nation's big-city mayors, saying cities have been ignored too long by Congress, President Bush and presidential candidates, plan to stage a march on Washington next month to call attention to the plight of urban America."
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NEWS
June 21, 2011
It isn't often that the U.S. Conference of Mayors expresses its collective opinion on an issue of foreign policy. The last time the group did so was in 1971, when it called on the president and Congress to end the war in Vietnam. So it was significant that the nation's mayors, meeting in Baltimore over the weekend, voted overwhelming on Monday to urge President Obama to do the same in Afghanistan and Iraq, with the aim of redirecting the billions of dollars we are spending on those wars toward addressing the pressing problems facing America's cities today.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
After being invited yesterday to join more than 70 mayors for a meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House today, indicted Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon was abruptly un-invited hours later, according to her spokesman. "We were really hoping that the mayor was going to make this meeting at the White House," said spokesman Scott Peterson. "But it does not look like it is going to happen." Peterson could not say why the mayor was un-invited to the meeting, coordinated by the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
Baltimore's police and fire unions would like us to know they are mad at the mayor. Message received. Their lawsuit against the city, seeking to force it to reverse cuts to their pension benefits and pay tens of millions of dollars Baltimore doesn't have, was a pretty big clue, and if that was lost on anyone, the billboards around town saying Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the City Council "turned their backs" on police and firefighters certainly did...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1993
A symphony orchestra, two choirs and a chorus are among the 14 acts on the Mayors' Pre-Inauguration Gala entertainment list for Monday night at the Convention Center.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the U.S. Conference of Mayors are the hosts of the invitation-only event.The Peabody Symphony Orchestra will be conducted by Hajime Teri Murai and feature baritone Gordon Hawkins.The three choral groups are the Morgan State University Choir, the Baltimore City College Choir and the Baltimore Men's Chorus.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
More than 230 mayors are expected at the Baltimor Convention Center tomorrow for a black-tie celebration of cities -- which many of them are confident will receive new federal attention when Bill Clinton becomes president.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the U.S. Conference of Mayors say they organized the gala because they expect urban issues to return to the top of the national agenda with the inauguration of Mr. Clinton Wednesday."It is a chance to come together at a time of great hope in our country," Mr. Schmoke said.
NEWS
December 27, 1997
THERE WAS A hell of a fight two years ago in Baltimore over the imposition of an updated juvenile curfew law. New data released this month by the U.S. Conference of Mayors indicates curfews are growing in popularity and are being given partial credit for drops in juvenile crime. The information suggests Baltimore was right to continue its curfew law, but public officials must keep in mind the tool has only limited value.Baltimore first imposed a curfew in 1983 that prohibited unsupervised minors from being on the street after 11 p.m. The shooting of a 10-year-old boy led to passage of an even tougher law in 1994, but it couldn't stand up to constitutional scrutiny.
NEWS
By New Orleans Times-Picayune | February 20, 1992
BIG CITIES and small towns alike across the country are beset by many of the same problems: deteriorating infrastructures, crime, weak to dying economies.All of the candidates, including President Bush, talk about the need to create "jobs, jobs, jobs" in general terms. But little is said specifically about the need to revitalize the economies of the cities and small towns.Enter the nation's mayors. They have a plan they say would create 280,500 jobs this year and help lift the nation out of recession.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 9, 1991
The U.S. Conference of Mayors is planning a nationwide march on Washington next April to protest what conference President Raymond L. Flynn calls the federal government's "callous neglect of the people of urban America."Flynn, mayor of Boston, called for "a new civil rights movement in America . . . an economic justice movement . . . that will wake people up and turn this country around."The proposed march is scheduled for Saturday, April 4, the anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.The mayors who joined Flynn yesterday for a news conference, a bipartisan group of about 20, made it clear that they intend to make domestic policy and their urban agenda important political issues in the presidential campaign.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is joining the call for a congressional probe into charges that a drug ring with ties to the CIA introduced crack cocaine to the nation's cities -- and is urging other mayors to do the same.In letters sent yesterday, Schmoke urged his fellow urban leaders to join the Congressional Black Caucus in asking for an investigation into the charges raised last month in a three-part series in the San Jose Mercury News."You know of the devastating impact that drugs have had on cities in the past two decades," Schmoke wrote.
NEWS
By Frank James and Ben Meyerson and Frank James and Ben Meyerson,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 21, 2009
WASHINGTON - Even as President Barack Obama told the nation's mayors yesterday that they now have a friend in the White House, he warned that he would use the "full power" of the presidency to expose and crack down on them if they misuse the stimulus dollars meant to boost the economy out of its doldrums. The mayors, in turn, encouraged Obama to focus the stimulus on cities, where they said it would have the greatest impact. Giving state governments too much leeway with the funds could reduce the effectiveness of the program, they said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
After being invited yesterday to join more than 70 mayors for a meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House today, indicted Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon was abruptly un-invited hours later, according to her spokesman. "We were really hoping that the mayor was going to make this meeting at the White House," said spokesman Scott Peterson. "But it does not look like it is going to happen." Peterson could not say why the mayor was un-invited to the meeting, coordinated by the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | August 23, 2008
Tourism and government leaders lauded yesterday's opening of the $301 million city-owned downtown convention headquarters hotel, promising that a project that survived years of controversy over its taxpayer-backed funding and its Camden Yards location will provide Baltimore with newfound commerce. The 757-room Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel, the city's largest-ever public investment, opened to its first guests yesterday morning, nearly six years after Baltimore officials first proposed the West Pratt Street hotel.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Nearly five years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and a year after Hurricane Katrina, a majority of American cities believe the federal government is failing to help them prepare for disasters, a new survey shows. Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley joined five other mayors yesterday at the National Press Club here to discuss the findings of a survey of 183 cities conducted by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. "[Department of Homeland Security] funding to states and cities has steadily decreased," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
As Mayor Martin O'Malley has experienced over the past year, attaining a national profile - especially on the critical topic of homeland security - can cut both ways for a local politician with sights set on higher office. The mayor's opinions on how cities can best protect themselves against terrorism has landed O'Malley national speaking and leadership roles on the issue. But his frequent criticism of President Bush on the topic also has resulted in public relations debacles after he twice related Bush policies to the Sept.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Baltimore's Martin O'Malley and about four dozen other U.S. mayors are urging the federal government to require railroads to inform local governments of any plans to transport hazardous materials through their communities. In a letter to outgoing Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge this week, the mayors pointed to this month's Norfolk Southern train derailment in South Carolina, which led to the rupture of a tank car carrying chlorine. Nine people were killed and about 250 injured by the release of the toxic chlorine cloud in the small town of Graniteville.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 10, 1995
City mayors no longer speak for ''urban'' America. Growing pockets of suburban ''urban'' woes, from drugs and crime to decayed housing and abandoned commercial strips, vary only in degree from those of the inner cities. So do budget dilemmas, welfare and social challenges, economic positioning, environmental issues.The new urban reality, in America and across the world, is regional. Our citistate regions are profoundly interdependent. A conference of mayors of the inner cities is an anomaly.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 23, 2004
In Baltimore City Homicide ruled in death of woman found behind school A 25-year-old woman who was found unconscious, beaten and raped behind a city middle school in June died this week, and her death has been ruled a homicide, police said yesterday. Emma O'Hearn of the 600 block of S. Pulaski St. was partially clothed when she was found by two girls behind Calverton Middle School in West Baltimore on June 10, police said. O'Hearn was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center and transferred to University Specialty Hospital, where she died Tuesday, police said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley and eight fellow mayors are scheduled today to visit a Park Heights neighborhood that has seen crime drop and to warn that proposed cuts in federal law-enforcement grants could jeopardize such progress. The mayors -- including those of New Orleans, Akron, Ohio, and Elizabeth, N.J., -- are to hold a noon news conference at Garrison Boulevard and Palmer Avenue, where police and residents say drug dealing has been vanquished and violent crime is down sharply. The event is part of a lobbying campaign by the U.S. Conference of Mayors to stop the Bush administration from reducing the COPS police hiring program by nearly $600 million, or 80 percent, and another police grant program by $200 million.
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