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By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1998
A controversial plan to rededicate a Confederate monument in Ellicott City received another blow yesterday as Maryland's secretary of state refused to issue a proclamation he considered inflammatory.John T. Willis declined to approve a request by Sons of Confederate Veterans to proclaim tomorrow "Howard County Confederate Heritage Day," saying it would be "inappropriate" to issue a government proclamation that "unnecessarily inflames emotions and might divide rather than unify the citizens of Maryland."
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NEWS
March 29, 2014
The calls to remove Charles Stanley's name from the Laurel public library are narrow-minded and reflect the shallow, simplistic understanding the vast majority of Americans have about the Civil War. If asked to identify the cause of the Civil War, most Americans would reflexively respond, "slavery. " This is simply not true. Like all major events in history, the Civil War was complex and defies any simple explanation. Attributing the Civil War solely to slavery is intellectually lazy.
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FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
The message on Anthony Cohen's answering machine offers a number of options:"To book a lecture, press one.""For fax, e-mail or address, press two.""For mailing list, press three.""For calendar of events, press four.""For interviews, press five." All right, we'll bite. "Leave name, office number and home number. If you are calling long distance, I will call you back collect due to the high volume of calls I've been getting. Thank you."Interested in getting together with Cohen this month? Don't even think about it. "I have no available dates left this month," the machine informs callers in a stern, no-nonsense voice.
NEWS
January 23, 2009
Omitting Pete Seeger derails concert review While I understand the difficulty of writing a concert review and know that someone will inevitably be disappointed by a reviewer's failure to mention a concert participant, The Baltimore Sun's review of the inaugural concert at the Lincoln Memorial was egregious in its omission of the presence of Pete Seeger ("Musical messages of hope, faith," Jan. 19). While many Hollywood celebrities were part of the celebration, no other person was more deserving of that bully pulpit on such a day of celebration than was Mr. Seeger, who was blacklisted in the 1950s, marched with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and participated in the Poor People's March in 1968 at that same site.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions incorrectly referred to the battle flag reproduced on Maryland license plates for members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans as the Stars and Bars. The Stars and Bars, with horizontal stripes, was the Confederate national flag.The Sun regrets the errors.You don't have to be a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to own a Maryland license tag with a Confederate symbol. In fact, you probably have one on your car right now.The stylized red and white cross that appears in the state seal and flag -- and on most Maryland license tags -- was a powerful symbol of Confederate sympathy in Maryland during and after the Civil War.Maryland men fighting in Confederate regiments often wore the cross on their lapels and incorporated it into their unit flags.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 17, 1994
CUMBERLAND -- A Confederate battle flag was removed from City Hall last night after officials here agreed that a museum was a more appropriate place for the controversial banner.The Allegany County chapter of the NAACP last month asked the City Council and mayor to remove the Confederate flag from display because of its association with hatred and racism."The Confederate battle flag's use by people who espouse the inferiority of others because of skin color or religion continues today," said Councilman Floyd "Pete" Elliott, reading a prepared statement.
NEWS
January 8, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions incorrectly referred to the battle flag reproduced on Maryland license plates for members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans as the Stars and Bars. The Stars and Bars, with horizontal stripes, was the Confederate national flag.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 1/08/97
NEWS
September 21, 1998
IT IS THE right of members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and anyone else who so desires to gather peacefully and commemorate the rebels from Howard County who fought for the South in the Civil War.They plan to do so Saturday at a rededication of a Confederate monument near the Howard County Circuit Courthouse in Ellicott City.Many people wish the granite tombstone had never been erected on public property. (It was dedicated Sept. 23, 1948.) But it's there. And those who feel compelled to honor what it represents to them should not be prohibited.
NEWS
February 6, 1997
Some editions of The Sun yesterday carried an Associated Press report that erroneously stated that a preliminary injunction was granted to prevent the state from confiscating license plates issued to members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Instead, U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in Baltimore granted a request for an expedited hearing of a motion for a preliminary injunction.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/06/97
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
A proclamation to declare Sunday Howard County Confederate Heritage Day and related plans by the local Sons of Confederate Veterans to rededicate a Confederate monument in Ellicott City have angered African-American leaders in Howard County who believe both events celebrate slavery and racism."
NEWS
November 22, 2008
I was dismayed to read that, after 20 years of hosting the groups, the Johns Hopkins University is refusing to allow Confederate Civil War re-enactment groups to rent space for their yearly ceremony ("Hopkins balks at Confederate banner," Nov. 20). As the wife of a Civil War history enthusiast, I know that the Civil War was about more than just slavery and that those who seek to celebrate Confederate ancestors are not also seeking to celebrate discrimination and bigotry. By including in its article on the controversy quotes from the NAACP condemning the Confederate flag as a symbol of hatred, the newspapers boxes re-enactors and historical enthusiasts in with white supremacists and others who twist history to suit their political needs.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Every January, descendants of Confederate soldiers gather in Wyman Park to march under the banner of the Confederacy, sing "Dixie" and lay wreaths at the monument to Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, legendary generals of the Confederate States of America. And afterward, for 20 years now, everyone has gone across the street to the Johns Hopkins University for coffee and refreshments, with some of the 200 descendants and observers still wearing the uniforms of Confederate re-enactors and carrying the flag.
NEWS
June 1, 2004
Alberta Martin, 97, the last widow of a Civil War veteran, died on Memorial Day in Montgomery, Ala., ending an unlikely ascent from sharecropper's daughter to the belle of 21st century Confederate history buffs who paraded her across the South. Mrs. Martin died of complications from a heart attack she suffered May 7, said her caretaker, Dr. Kenneth Chancey. Her May-December marriage in the 1920s to Civil War veteran William Jasper Martin and her longevity made her a celebrated final link to the old Confederacy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2003
RICHMOND, Va. - Two ceremonies were taking place yesterday with purposes as different as day and night, or North and South. One was the unveiling of a statue of Abraham Lincoln, the other a vigil in protest at the grave of Jefferson Davis. The statue of Lincoln, commissioned by the U.S. Historical Society, is in a park that was the site of Tredegar Ironworks, where tons of Confederate materiel were forged during the Civil War. The protest, by about 100 members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, was at Hollywood Cemetery, where many of the Confederacy's politicians and civic leaders are buried, as well as 18,000 Civil War soldiers.
NEWS
By David Lamb and David Lamb,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2003
ENTERPRISE, Ala. - A friend of Alberta Martin's came calling the other day to give the 96-year-old widow news of a death. She awaited him at the nursing home in her wheelchair, wearing red beads and her best dress, a Confederate flag spread over her lap. She nibbled on a bag of cheese puffs. "Miz Alberta," said the friend, Ken Chancey. "You remember the Yankee widow you met some years back? Gertrude Janeway? Well, she died last week. "You're all America's got left now. You're the last surviving widow of a Civil War soldier.
NEWS
By GREGOYR KANE | September 22, 2002
IF I made a bet that this fella Stan Armstrong likes to ice-skate uphill, I'd probably get no takers. Armstrong's a filmmaker, not exactly the easiest of careers to break into. You have to get the training. Then have to hope financing comes from somewhere for a film. To make matters even more difficult, Armstrong's a documentary filmmaker. Remember documentaries? Good. I barely do. Few directors bother to make them anymore. It's rare for a major studio to fund one. Armstrong is also a black documentary filmmaker and, so the perception goes, faces the obstacle of race in a white-dominated field.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
The Sons of Confederate Veterans will hold their annual memorial ceremony for Gens. Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson at 11 a.m. Jan. 17 at the Lee-Jackson Monument, Art Museum and Wyman Park Drives, near Johns Hopkins University.The ceremony will include period music by fife and drum groups and a massed formation of Civil War re-enactors in Confederate and Union uniforms.Refreshments will be served afterward at Shriver Hall on Hopkins' campus.Pub Date: 12/16/97
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2003
RICHMOND, Va. - Two ceremonies were taking place yesterday with purposes as different as day and night, or North and South. One was the unveiling of a statue of Abraham Lincoln, the other a vigil in protest at the grave of Jefferson Davis. The statue of Lincoln, commissioned by the U.S. Historical Society, is in a park that was the site of Tredegar Ironworks, where tons of Confederate materiel were forged during the Civil War. The protest, by about 100 members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, was at Hollywood Cemetery, where many of the Confederacy's politicians and civic leaders are buried, as well as 18,000 Civil War soldiers.
NEWS
July 2, 2002
William Wheary Beane, until recently a senior vice president of risk management at Carrollton Bank, died June 25 of multiple organ failure at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 60. The cause of death may have been the result of a spider bite, said his wife of 36 years, the former Sandra Mayer. The Virginia native attended Randolph-Macon Academy in Front Royal, Va., and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration and accounting from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., in 1965.
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