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NEWS
September 15, 2014
Speech is designed to convey a message which carries with it an intended tone, purpose and meaning by the speaker. The recent incident in which a Confederate flag was raised at a high school football game in Howard County has quickly turned into a First Amendment argument, followed quickly by volleys of opposing opinions and arguments about the symbolism of this particular flag ( "Glenelg High student disciplined for displaying Confederate flag at...
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
There are many specious arguments you publish in your letter to the editor section, but the letter claiming the Confederate battle flag is a "part of Southern heritage" is beyond the pale ( "Flag is an emblem of Southern culture," Sept. 16). It's like waving around a Nazi swastika flag and claiming it's "just a part of German heritage. " There is only one reason to display the Confederate flag and that is racism, plain and simple. In fact, if we were really being serious about history, we should remember that the Confederate flag stands for succession or, to give it the more correct name, treason.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
There are many specious arguments you publish in your letter to the editor section, but the letter claiming the Confederate battle flag is a "part of Southern heritage" is beyond the pale ( "Flag is an emblem of Southern culture," Sept. 16). It's like waving around a Nazi swastika flag and claiming it's "just a part of German heritage. " There is only one reason to display the Confederate flag and that is racism, plain and simple. In fact, if we were really being serious about history, we should remember that the Confederate flag stands for succession or, to give it the more correct name, treason.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2000
Former GOP presidential candidate John W. McCain plans to go to South Carolina today, where he will announce his opposition to the Confederate flag flying over the state Capitol, sources said. The announcement is a marked shift from his comments during the primary season, in which McCain and rival George W. Bush refused to take a stand on the issue during their heated battle to win the state's Feb. 19 contest. Top campaign aides said that McCain regretted not urging the flag's removal before the primary, which he lost to Bush.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 20, 2000
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Major international artist Leon Golub has canceled a Charleston exhibit to support the National Association for Advancement of Colored People's boycott over the Confederate flag. Golub, whose work often comments on repression and human rights violations, stated in a letter to the gallery, "This is in protest to the continuing display of the Confederate flag atop the State Capitol." In keeping with the nature of his art and beliefs, Golub, a native of Chicago, stated he would not show his art in South Carolina.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 31, 1994
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Some say this is about nothing more than a flag, a piece of trivia and cloth with 13 white stars, two blue stripes and a red field.Others say it is about history.Some say the flag represents breakaway states that enslaved millions.Others say it symbolizes states' rights, and besides, the Union side had slaves, too.Some say the flag is associated with an army crushed on the field of battle.Others say it honors the gallantry of men and women who fought and died for what they believed.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 2, 2000
G. Elliott Cummings, with whom I agree on much that happened in the 20th century but on little that happened in the 19th, wants me to get it right. Cummings is a former commander of the Col. Harry W. Gilmor Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans' Maryland division (SCV). My Jan. 16 column referred to the flag flapping above the South Carolina statehouse as the "Stars and Bars." The flag in question is, Cummings said, the battle flag of the Confederate States of America. The Stars and Bars is another Confederate flag, a cute little number with a white stripe between two red ones with a circle of 13 stars on a blue square in the upper left-hand corner.
NEWS
By Brigid Schulte and Brigid Schulte,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 30, 1993
RICHMOND, Va. -- More than a century after the Confederate flag was furled in battle for the last time, the distinctive blue St. Andrew's cross on a field of red is still a loaded symbol.To many white southerners who see it flying over state capitols, as in South Carolina, the flag is a romantic memorial to heroism and a lost cause. To the Lithuanians and East Germans who waved it during the tumultuous last days of communism, it is the sign of the underdog, the rebel.But for most African Americans, the Confederate flag is a symbol of oppression, slavery and racist opposition to the struggle for civil rights.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
Speech is designed to convey a message which carries with it an intended tone, purpose and meaning by the speaker. The recent incident in which a Confederate flag was raised at a high school football game in Howard County has quickly turned into a First Amendment argument, followed quickly by volleys of opposing opinions and arguments about the symbolism of this particular flag ( "Glenelg High student disciplined for displaying Confederate flag at...
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 25, 2012
Pat Buchanan might have seen the end of the line coming at MSNBCwhen, last month, network president Phil Griffin commented on his latest book, "Suicide of a Superpower," by saying, "I don't think the ideas that [Buchanan] put forth are appropriate for the national dialogue, much less on MSNBC. " When Mr. Buchanan was let go last week after 10 years as a commentator on the network, no one was surprised. I don't agree with some of Mr. Buchanan's ideas, especially regarding Jews, his questioning of whether World War II had to happen or whether the United States should be involved militarily in the Middle East, but he has every right to his ideas, as we all have the right to our own. It's called free speech.
NEWS
November 25, 2008
Stars and Stripes also once symbolized racism I found the rationalization of the actions of Johns Hopkins University officials in the editorial "A civil action" (Nov. 21) a bit disingenuous. Certainly, the flags of the Confederacy were, at a time in our history, connected to racial oppression. But the Stars and Stripes was also, for a while, the banner of a nation that recognized slavery and constitutionally recognized its victims as only three-fifths of a person. Both were part of our history.
NEWS
November 22, 2008
I was dismayed to read that, after 20 years of hosting the groups, the Johns Hopkins University is refusing to allow Confederate Civil War re-enactment groups to rent space for their yearly ceremony ("Hopkins balks at Confederate banner," Nov. 20). As the wife of a Civil War history enthusiast, I know that the Civil War was about more than just slavery and that those who seek to celebrate Confederate ancestors are not also seeking to celebrate discrimination and bigotry. By including in its article on the controversy quotes from the NAACP condemning the Confederate flag as a symbol of hatred, the newspapers boxes re-enactors and historical enthusiasts in with white supremacists and others who twist history to suit their political needs.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Every January, descendants of Confederate soldiers gather in Wyman Park to march under the banner of the Confederacy, sing "Dixie" and lay wreaths at the monument to Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, legendary generals of the Confederate States of America. And afterward, for 20 years now, everyone has gone across the street to the Johns Hopkins University for coffee and refreshments, with some of the 200 descendants and observers still wearing the uniforms of Confederate re-enactors and carrying the flag.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | January 24, 2008
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- They just can't help it. As soon as politicians and pundits cross the South Carolina line, their IQs plummet 20 points. I reckon the candidates figure if they say really dumb stuff, them lowbrow, redneck yahoos will vote them right into that great big ol' house up in Washington. Some of those yokels, like yokels everywhere, may be dumber 'n a box o' rocks, but they're smart enough to know what the newcomers want and, aiming to please, seem determined to give it to them.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
The NAACP will not back down from its effort to ban the flying of the Confederate flag at state and local government addresses throughout the South, a policy that sparked a peaceful protest by a small group of demonstrators, some in Confederate soldier uniforms, at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday. "The resolution will not be rescinded," said Kweisi Mfume, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, referring to a 1991 resolution that sparked a boycott against South Carolina, where the Confederate flag had flown over the Statehouse dome until July 1. The boycott will continue until the flag - which now flies at what some consider a more visible site at a Civil War memorial near the Statehouse - is removed from state grounds, said Mfume, who says it is a symbol of slavery.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1997
Disappointed by a judge's decision upholding the use of Confederate flags on specialty license plates, state officials are pondering a possible appeal while a lawmaker has drafted a bill abolishing all specialty tags.State Del. Clarence M. Mitchell IV, who opposes the Confederate flag on license plates, said he is introducing a bill to abolish all vanity and specialty tags granted to individuals and nonprofit organizations by the state.A federal judge ruled Monday that state motor vehicle officials violated the free speech rights of the Sons of Confederate Veterans when they revoked plates bearing the group's logo, the Confederate battle flag.
NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | October 9, 2006
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- For Kitty Green, the NAACP's call for an economic boycott of the state seven years ago was a "slap in the face." While the teacher-turned-entrepreneur supports the civil rights organization's effort to remove the Confederate flag from the State House grounds, the sanctions hit her business hard. Now some members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People are questioning whether it's good policy to continue the boycott. In 2000, the flag was moved from atop the State House dome to a monument in front of the capitol, and there's no plan to move it again.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
When Anthony Wright steps onto a football field, he instinctively reminds himself to block out everything except the game. He will say it today at The Coliseum in Nashville, Tenn., where a strong performance against the Tennessee Titans could begin a campaign to remain the Ravens' starting quarterback. He will say it like he did so often at the University of South Carolina, where the pressure wasn't from breaking into the starting lineup but from breaking down a color barrier. A decade ago, Wright did what was once unthinkable, becoming the first black starting quarterback in the school's then-104-year football history.
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