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Confederate Battle Flag

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By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 17, 1994
CUMBERLAND -- A Confederate battle flag was removed from City Hall last night after officials here agreed that a museum was a more appropriate place for the controversial banner.The Allegany County chapter of the NAACP last month asked the City Council and mayor to remove the Confederate flag from display because of its association with hatred and racism."The Confederate battle flag's use by people who espouse the inferiority of others because of skin color or religion continues today," said Councilman Floyd "Pete" Elliott, reading a prepared statement.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 16, 2010
Leonard Pitts' column appears regularly. His e-mail is lpitts@miamiherald.com. We are gathered here today to pay our final respects to John McCain's integrity. It died recently — turned a triple somersault, stiffened like an exclamation point, fell to the floor with its tongue hanging out — when the senator told Newsweek magazine, "I never considered myself a maverick." This, after the hard-fought presidential campaign of 2008 in which Mr. McCain, his advertising team, his surrogates and his running mate all but tattooed the "M" word on their foreheads.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 20, 2001
Uh-oh. The market thinks the recession is over. The market is never right. The Confederate battle flag, emblem for the violent destruction of the United States, will remain on the state flag of Mississippi. A poem urging that course will remain the state song of Maryland. So is Maryland better than Mississippi? Hizzoner would condemn City Hall if it stood in the path of the West Side project.
NEWS
November 28, 2008
Civil War sensitivity must run both ways I read with interest the editorial "A Civil action" (Nov. 21) which seems to confuse the "Stars and Bars" with the Confederate Battle Flag. The Stars and Bars is actually the first Confederate national flag. Mostly, it flew over Confederate government buildings during the war. The battle flag is the one depicted in the photo next to the editorial. Unfortunately, that flag has often been usurped by hate groups that share nothing in common with the Sons of Confederate Veterans.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 7, 2000
Ray Lewis could give violence a bad name. The Confederate Battle Flag is not a symbol of slavery. It stands for the forcible overthrow of the United States in the 19th Century and massive resistance to the rule of law in the 20th. If the new millennium is so hot, how come it begins with genocide in Chechnya, power to the worst people in Austria and IRA gun-nuttiness in Ireland? Too bad New Hampshire can't have its own president.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
A proclamation to declare Sunday Howard County Confederate Heritage Day and related plans by the local Sons of Confederate Veterans to rededicate a Confederate monument in Ellicott City have angered African-American leaders in Howard County who believe both events celebrate slavery and racism."
NEWS
February 25, 1993
President Clinton and Vice President Gore may both be products of the "New South," but some old controversies still simmer. In recent weeks several states have been the scene of heated disputes over one of the most divisive symbols of the Old South, displays of the Confederate battle flag on state flags and property.In Georgia, a bitter fight erupted over Gov. Zell Miller's proposal to eliminate the Confederate symbol from the state flag, something many Georgians want to see happen before Atlanta hosts the Olympics in 1996.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
Opponents of flag misrepresent nature of the Confederacy I have closely followed the recent attacks on the Confederate flag flying over South Carolinas capitol, (In S.C., a clash over race, heritage, Jan. 16). The arguments for taking the flag down are based upon misunderstandings or misrepresentations of what the Confederacy originally stood for. The Confederacy did not stand for slavery. The Confederate nation valued individual rights, liberty, state sovereignty, and self-determination.
NEWS
May 22, 2000
MISSISSIPPI has no state flag. The banner that everyone thought was the state flag incorporates the Confederate battle flag and has flown since the 19th century. But the Mississippi Supreme Court ruled that that flag is not official, giving Mississippi a chance to adopt one that all of its residents can salute. Mississipians of all races -- it was the home of William Faulkner, Elvis Presley, Richard Wright and Muddy Waters -- deserve a symbol of pride. The new, official banner could carry images of the state's tree (the magnolia)
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions incorrectly referred to the battle flag reproduced on Maryland license plates for members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans as the Stars and Bars. The Stars and Bars, with horizontal stripes, was the Confederate national flag.The Sun regrets the errors.You don't have to be a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to own a Maryland license tag with a Confederate symbol. In fact, you probably have one on your car right now.The stylized red and white cross that appears in the state seal and flag -- and on most Maryland license tags -- was a powerful symbol of Confederate sympathy in Maryland during and after the Civil War.Maryland men fighting in Confederate regiments often wore the cross on their lapels and incorporated it into their unit flags.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
These days, the term "political correctness" is used most commonly by the political right to rage against allegedly misguided efforts to minimize public offense, particularly on the subjects of race and sex. There's a better term for the decision by Johns Hopkins University officials not to host on campus - just days before the inauguration of the nation's first African-American president - 200 sons and daughters of the Confederacy, some of whom would...
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 8, 2006
CHICAGO -- The immigration protests held across the country last Monday serve as a perfect Rorschach test: What reaction did you have to the sight of hundreds of thousands of immigrants marching down American streets, calling on Congress to accommodate them? Dismay? Ambivalence? Admiration? A lot of political debates turn on facts and arguments. This one is mostly a matter of competing emotions. Among many conservatives, the emotion is outrage. Republican Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi said the protests "make me mad."
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 18, 2004
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Thousands of men in Confederate gray and Union blue, and women in black hoop skirts and veils, escorted the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship, to its final resting place yesterday. In what was called the last Confederate funeral, the coffins of the crew members, draped in Confederate flags, were first taken to Charleston's Battery and placed in a semicircle, a wreath set in front of each. Then, a column of the uniformed re-enactors stretching 1 1/2 miles took the crew of the Hunley, which sank outside Charleston Harbor, to their final resting place in Magnolia Cemetery, about five miles north.
NEWS
By Jesse Lee Peterson | August 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Boycotts are an effective means for achieving social change. The Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott was a key point in the struggle for civil rights. Southern Baptists are boycotting the Walt Disney Co. to protest the company's moves away from family-friendly entertainment. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has made headlines for its high-profile boycotts of South Carolina for flying the Confederate battle flag atop the state's capitol and most recently the Adam's Mark hotel chain over what it claims are discriminatory practices.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2001
YORK, Pa. - A Confederate flag hangs near the railroad crossing where a black minister's daughter was gunned down 32 years ago as race riots tore through this blue-collar town. The flag stirs emotions most everywhere it is flown. But here, in a community where nine white men, including the mayor, will file into court this morning to face murder charges in the 1969 ambush-style shooting death of Lillie Belle Allen, it has an added effect. Its presence is seen by some as one more blemish on a community where many already feel unfairly painted with the same broad brush.
NEWS
April 30, 2001
Elkridge is no place to relcate city strip club Dan Rodricks recommended that strip club owner Kenny Jackson move his establishment to U.S. 1 in Elkridge ("Nice guys finish last -- and cost us too much," April 13). I take issue with this on behalf of the good people of Elkridge. Rather than finding citizens rolling out the welcome mat, Mr. Jackson would likely find a citizenry outraged and ready to defend their community from the element such an establishment would attract. I have been a county councilman for two-and-a-half years, and I have yet to meet a group of people more dedicated to the preservation and improvement of their community than the citizens of Elkridge.
NEWS
By William Lowe | May 15, 2000
THE CIVIL War may have ended 135 years ago, but the recent contention over the Confederate battle flag in South Carolina illustrates that the struggle to fix the war's meaning persists into our time. It remains to be seen whether the South Carolina House's vote to move the Confederate battle flag from the capital dome to the soldier monument will resolve the present conflict. Regardless, the rhetorical practices of the flag's supporters are as much a part of white Southern heritage as the flag itself.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
HILTON HEAD, S.C. -- In what may be the first sign of the NAACP backing away from the activism that marked the tenure of fired executive director Benjamin F. Chavis, organization leaders yesterday postponed a threatened economic boycott of South Carolina.At war with state officials over the flying of the Confederate battle flag above the Capitol dome, Dr. Chavis had threatened in July to strike at the state's $7.3 billion tourism industry with a black boycott unless the flag comes down.But still struggling to recover from the controversy surrounding Dr. Chavis' dismissal and faced with splintered local support, national NAACP leaders instead came to this sedate island resort to deliver fiery rhetoric, lead 600 chanting protesters on a two-mile march and then announce that they would wait for legal action to run its course before deciding what further action to take.
NEWS
By Loretta J. Ross | April 29, 2001
MY FAMILY was shot at in Mississippi in 1963 while moving from Virginia to Texas. It was when my Jamaican-born father, newly retired from the Army, used a "whites only" bathroom at a filling station. When told he used the wrong bathroom, my father thought the white man meant the women's room. They scuffled. We left, a bullet chasing us down the highway. Why doesn't Mississippi ever seem to change? The April 17 vote to retain the state flag was that of the old Mississippi, rejecting any opportunity to join the New South.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 20, 2001
Uh-oh. The market thinks the recession is over. The market is never right. The Confederate battle flag, emblem for the violent destruction of the United States, will remain on the state flag of Mississippi. A poem urging that course will remain the state song of Maryland. So is Maryland better than Mississippi? Hizzoner would condemn City Hall if it stood in the path of the West Side project.
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