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NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
There are many specious arguments you publish in your letter to the editor section, but the letter claiming the Confederate battle flag is a "part of Southern heritage" is beyond the pale ( "Flag is an emblem of Southern culture," Sept. 16). It's like waving around a Nazi swastika flag and claiming it's "just a part of German heritage. " There is only one reason to display the Confederate flag and that is racism, plain and simple. In fact, if we were really being serious about history, we should remember that the Confederate flag stands for succession or, to give it the more correct name, treason.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Arts Writer | December 17, 2003
Eight days before it is scheduled to open in movie theaters, the Civil War epic Cold Mountain already is generating Oscar hype. Set in North Carolina and Virginia, the movie tells the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate soldier who takes a long journey on foot through the Blue Ridge mountains to return to the woman he loves. He dodges Yankee soldiers and his own troops, who are shooting deserters. The film, which is based on the National Book Award-winning novel by Charles Frazier, stars Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
The calls to remove Charles Stanley's name from the Laurel public library are narrow-minded and reflect the shallow, simplistic understanding the vast majority of Americans have about the Civil War. If asked to identify the cause of the Civil War, most Americans would reflexively respond, "slavery. " This is simply not true. Like all major events in history, the Civil War was complex and defies any simple explanation. Attributing the Civil War solely to slavery is intellectually lazy.
FEATURES
By SCOTT MCCAFFREY and SCOTT MCCAFFREY,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
ELLENTON, Fla. -- Being foreign-born and married to a French Catholic wife woman could be enough to get a Southerner ostracized from polite society in the years before the Civil War. Being a Jew seemingly would be a kiss of death in politics or business.Yet Judah Benjamin survived and thrived, arguably becoming an the second most important political figure of the Confederacy. during the waning days of the war.After the Union victory, while others like Jefferson Davis were captured and jailed, Benjamin escaped to the Caribbean and then to England, where he made carved out a second illustrious career for himself.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- Driving along Monument Avenue, past the massive stone statues of Robert E. Lee and other Confederate warriors, Charles Chambliss said in disgust, "Somehow the Confederacy made the losers look honorable." In recent weeks, a downtown mural of Lee has been set on fire and his reputation defended in a dispute over how history should be marked here in the capital of the Old Confederacy. It's a fight that heritage groups say embodies a resolve by civil rights leaders to rid the South of Confederate symbols.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | March 15, 1997
I DON'T PLAN TO APPLY for a Howard Stern license plate from the Motor Vehicle Administration. But the hype surrounding the shock-jock and his new movie, ''Private Parts,'' afforded me an unsettling appreciation of the emotions felt by the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Maryland.The Sons were scorned after someone realized they were driving around with special license plates bearing the Confederate flag. African-American legislators and others were offended by state-sanctioned use of a banner under which slavery was defended.
NEWS
By Warren Buckler | July 23, 1999
WHILE Marylanders fought and killed each other throughout the Civil War, the Battle of Gettysburg stands out in popular memory at least as a particularly harsh reminder of the animosities that made this state to an extraordinary degree "a house divided." Anyone whose roots in Baltimore and Maryland go back into the 19th century has surely become well versed in family lore related to the terrible blood-letting, 136 years ago this month, just up the road in Pennsylvania. In our family, my grandmother, Mary Coleman (Herbert)
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane and Michael E. Ruane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 1997
"The Confederate War," by Gary W. Gallagher. 288 pages. Harvard University Press. $24.95A month after Abraham Lincoln became president in March of 1861, a young North Carolina military officer who had just quit the U.S. Army sent home a newly minted Confederate banner.William Dorsey Pender, 27, the West Point-trained former dragoon, wrote his wife, Fanny. "It is yours as much as mine and by it you must stick."It was still a week before Fort Sumter and almost two months before his state would join the fledgling Confederacy.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
Speech is designed to convey a message which carries with it an intended tone, purpose and meaning by the speaker. The recent incident in which a Confederate flag was raised at a high school football game in Howard County has quickly turned into a First Amendment argument, followed quickly by volleys of opposing opinions and arguments about the symbolism of this particular flag ( "Glenelg High student disciplined for displaying Confederate flag at...
NEWS
July 31, 2014
Supporters of the League of the South can debate all they want whether their organization is truly a neo-Confederate hate group, as the Southern Poverty Law Center has classified them, but it would be much harder to argue that it isn't an oddball extremist group with some hair-raising ideas. That they support Southern secession and rally behind all things Confederate pretty much defines the Alabama-based league. These are not just some folks who spend their free hours dressing up in Civil War garb, whistling “Dixie” and recalling the good old days.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Benjamin Todd Jealous claims that Maryland "would have seceded from the Union in 1861 if not for Abraham Lincoln's last-minute decision to impose martial law and arrest 12 members of the General Assembly to prevent them from taking a vote" ( "Maryland: the new South," April 13). Neither claim is accurate. President Lincoln never imposed martial law in Maryland (nor did anyone else) and he specifically instructed the military authorities to allow the Maryland legislature to meet in special session in April 1861 without interference.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
In your edition of March 20, your reader Greg Clemmer states that to cite Charles Stanley's Confederate military service is "politically correct. " Well, if political correctness is what you wish to see, you need look no further than Article III of the federal Constitution, which describes levying war against the United States as a criminal act. That's what Charles Stanley did by joining the Confederate Army, regardless of his "heritage," his motives and the good works that he did later.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
The calls to remove Charles Stanley's name from the Laurel public library are narrow-minded and reflect the shallow, simplistic understanding the vast majority of Americans have about the Civil War. If asked to identify the cause of the Civil War, most Americans would reflexively respond, "slavery. " This is simply not true. Like all major events in history, the Civil War was complex and defies any simple explanation. Attributing the Civil War solely to slavery is intellectually lazy.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
I find it unfortunate that the Prince George's County Library Board believes it needs to remove Charles Stanley's name from Laurel's newly expanded and renovated library when it reopens. Citing Stanley's Confederate military experience - he served as a private in Company B, 1st Maryland Cavalry, CS - -is not only political correctness run amuck, it ignores and defies the post war contributions this man made to his community, his state and the United States for nearly a half century after Appomattox.  After the war, Charles Stanley returned to his community to farm and teach school, studying law in his spare time, being admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1869.
NEWS
July 10, 2005
Confederate soldiers descended on Westminster for the last time on July 9, 1864. Confederate General Bradley T. Johnson, who was from Maryland, ordered Colonel Harry Gilmor to cut all lines that enabled Washington to communicate with Baltimore, Philadelphia and other northern points. Along this path were the telegraph lines in Westminster. On the evening of July 9, Col. Gilmor and his troops galloped into Westminster, seized the telegraph and cut the lines in less than fifteen minutes. Gen. Johnson and the rest of the brigade arrived a few hours later.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1999
In the hometown of Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens, where residents have roots that stretch back three centuries, the Civil War still feels recent enough that there's room to honor its heroes with monuments.So next week in Lothian, in a private ceremony next to a small white-clapboard church, a group of her friends and closest advisers will do just that. But the sentimental gesture won't be enjoyed by all, because the life-sized bronze sculpture they will unveil along Route 408 honors a Confederate soldier.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
As a Laurel resident, I read with great interest the Feb. 20 article in the Laurel Leader and the letter to the editor from Lindsey Baker Feb. 27, regarding the Laurel Library branch retaining the Charles Stanley name after a new building is completed. In addition to his public service, Mr. Stanley was an American Confederate Civil War veteran, having served as a private in Company B of the First Regiment, Maryland Cavalry from 1862 to 1865 (Archives of Maryland 2002). In their letter, the Laurel Historical Society references how important "it is to understand the history of our community, in order to create a better future.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
"Many consider John Hanson, who was John Hanson Briscoe's relative and for whom he was named, as being the first president of the United States, and not George Washington," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, who was discussing the recent death of Briscoe, his longtime friend and former speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates. And regarding John Hanson's claim to being the first president, Hoyer is technically right. Hanson was elected the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation in 1781, several years before George Washington took the role under the newly formed United States.
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