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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
TOKYO -- At midmorning yesterday, about 400 people stood outside Tokyo's Isetan Department Store. At 10 o'clock sharp, its wide glass doors opened, accompanied by a burst of Vivaldi, and the would-be shoppers rushed inside.Nearly half of them hurried past the bowing sales clerks, Hermes scarves and Shiseido cosmetics -- running straight to the eighth floor to become among the first in Japan to see the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection.The 73 artworks, here on their first overseas tour, are on display at the Isetan Museum of Art, located on the eighth floor of one of the city's largest department stores.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2012
During her long career as a sculptor and painter in Baltimore, Amalie Rothschild developed a distinctive take on geometric abstraction. You can follow the arc of that career in a gallery-filling retrospective at Towson University's Center for the Arts Gallery. Rothschild (1916-2001) was familiar with various approaches to 20th-century modernism and responded in her own way. Henri Matisse's 1935 oil painting "The Pink Nude," which belongs to the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Cone Collection, directly inspired two works by Rothschild in the present exhibit.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
TOKYO -- The elevator girl chants in her sing-song voice: "Welcome. Women's wear, imports, formal wear," and the doors glide open. She bows like a mechanical doll -- at precisely the same angle every time -- and gestures toward the merchandise.Her passengers step into a crowded, edgy city of fashion boutiques. Glistening marble alleys wind past Max Mara, Escada, Calvin Klein and Yoshie Inaba vendors and converge in a miniature traffic circle where the street signs say Gucci and Chanel.This is the third floor of Isetan Department Store, the flagship venue of a $5 billion Tokyo-based retail chain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 14, 2010
P aul Cezanne never had an entourage. His contemporary, Claude Monet, was far more politically savvy. He assiduously collected a circle of students, followers and well-connected patrons. But Cezanne was shy, reclusive, rude, nervous and disagreeable. He possessed all the social graces of a cornered skunk.But that didn't stop other artists in Europe and the U.S. from flipping over Cezanne's work, even though their only exposure to his vibrantly colored landscapes and meticulously composed still lifes were black-and-white photographs of the paintings.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 5, 1997
OSAKA, Japan -- When Yutaka Mino looks at the ancient Chinese scrolls, the blue-and-white Korean porcelain and the Japanese teapots and Buddhas that surround him at the Osaka Municipal Museum of Art, he thinks less of the past than of a future filled with opportunities. As the director of a museum best known for its extraordinary collection of thousand-year-old Chinese paintings, he sees room for much else: A museum gift shop. A cafe. A public-relations office. Educational programs.All American-style, he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 31, 2005
Baltimore's fabled Cone sisters, Claribel and Etta, were inveterate collectors who over the course of nearly half a century amassed one of the most important collections of Matisses in the world. How did they do it? Simple: They shopped till they dropped! Or: Practice, practice, practice. Remember, the fine arts weren't the only arena for the Cones' passionate buying. In addition to the 161 paintings, 79 sculptures, 685 prints and 398 drawings they acquired, they also bought illustrated books, fine furniture, skeleton keys, mortars and pestles, Turkish towels, postcards, travel guides, costume jewelry, fabrics, curios and antique lace.
NEWS
July 14, 2009
On July 4, 2009, E A memorial service will be held Tuesday, July 21 at 11 A.M. in the chapel at St. David's Church, 4700 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21210. In lieu of flowers contributions in her memory may be made to St. David's Church at the above address or to support the Cone Collection at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Contributions to the BMA may be sent to Development Office, Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 19, 1997
The Baltimore Museum of Art's exhibition "Andrew Wyeth: America's Painter" attracted 170,000 people during its 20-week run, which ended Sunday, making it the second most-popular show in the museum's 82-year-history, museum officials announced yesterday.The record was set when "Claude Monet: Impressionist Masterpieces from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston" drew 215,000 people during its 14-week show from October 1991 to January 1992, said Becca Seitz, director of public relations and marketing.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
The opening of the Monet exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art today inaugurates -- along with last weekend's opening of the Cone Collection show at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts -- an era in American museums. This is the first temporary swap by two major museums of hunks of their permanent collection, of this importance and magnitude. There will be more.Museums in such centers as New York and Washington lured the multitudes with "blockbuster" shows, painstakingly curated over years with works tracked to owners around the world and borrowed simultaneously at great care and expense.
NEWS
July 14, 2009
On July 4, 2009, E A memorial service will be held Tuesday, July 21 at 11 A.M. in the chapel at St. David's Church, 4700 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21210. In lieu of flowers contributions in her memory may be made to St. David's Church at the above address or to support the Cone Collection at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Contributions to the BMA may be sent to Development Office, Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
Home to the world's most comprehensive collection of work by Henri Matisse, the Baltimore Museum of Art is raising its international profile as an authority and a leading exhibitor of the French Modernist master. Last night, the museum moved closer to that goal as it announced a major gift of 77 Matisse prints - the largest acquisition since the Cone Collection laid the foundation for the BMA's Matisse holdings in 1950. And next Sunday, the museum will open Matisse: Painter as Sculptor, the first major U.S. exhibition of his sculpture in a generation.
FEATURES
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Once a week for the past six years, Aurelia Loveman has buried herself in a storage room of the Baltimore Museum of Art, gingerly removing pieces of lace from the boxes, linen envelopes and silk sheets that have concealed them for 55 years. Elegant cuffs and collars that once adorned royalty in the 17th-century court of Louis XIV, delicate Chantilly lace parasol covers, gauzy shawls and intricately woven 19th-century needle-lace fan leafs are among the valuable remnants hiding inside their dusty tombs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 31, 2005
Baltimore's fabled Cone sisters, Claribel and Etta, were inveterate collectors who over the course of nearly half a century amassed one of the most important collections of Matisses in the world. How did they do it? Simple: They shopped till they dropped! Or: Practice, practice, practice. Remember, the fine arts weren't the only arena for the Cones' passionate buying. In addition to the 161 paintings, 79 sculptures, 685 prints and 398 drawings they acquired, they also bought illustrated books, fine furniture, skeleton keys, mortars and pestles, Turkish towels, postcards, travel guides, costume jewelry, fabrics, curios and antique lace.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 17, 2002
It's commonplace that 90 percent of what's in museums lies mostly unseen, locked away in storage vaults that no one besides the odd staffer ever visits. Then every once in a while someone decides to pull these hidden treasures out, and suddenly we realize what we've been missing. Such is the case with the delightful little show of Japanese woodblock prints from the Cone Collection at the Baltimore Museum of Art, which runs through May 12. These diminutive pictures of beautiful geisha girls, courtesans, Kabuki actresses and other inhabitants of what the Japanese called ukiyo-e, or "the floating world" of private pleasure and entertainment, are surely among the BMA's most charming holdings.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
FOR TWO YEARS the most popular part of the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Cone Collection of early modern art, has been closed, its gems on tour. With other parts of the BMA closed for renovation and much of the Walters Art Museum closed for the same purpose at the same time, museum-hopping, museum membership and museum reverie have been in sad decline in Baltimore. Fortunately, that's over. The Walters Art Gallery helped prepare for its comeback, still awaited, by renaming itself Walters Art Museum, which is deemed more informative.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1996
When the Cone Collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings debuts this week in Japan, it will bring together that country's fascination with modern European masters and the Baltimore Museum of Art's desire to shine on an international stage.This first overseas loan of the BMA's renowned collection offers the museum a rare opportunity to introduce itself to hundreds of thousands of people who have little knowledge of the institution -- and, perhaps, to make a profit.In return, the museum is giving the Japanese a chance to see the best works from an extraordinary collection of modern European art assembled earlier this century by Baltimore sisters Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 31, 1992
Seven major modern paintings and seven drawings from the Museum of Modern Art in New York will come to the Baltimore Museum of Art this fall, the BMA announced yesterday.They will include van Gogh's "The Starry Night" (1889), Cezanne's "The Bather" (about 1885), Picasso's "Two Nudes" (1906), Edward Hopper's "House by the Railroad" (1925) and Jackson Pollock's "Number 1, 1948."The exhibit will open Nov. 22 and run through Jan. 17, 1993. The works will come here in exchange for 10 paintings and five drawings by Matisse, which the BMA is sending from the Cone collection to a MOMA Matisse retrospective at the same time.
NEWS
By Doreen Bolger | October 27, 1999
Over the past three months, The Sun's editorial page has published its Marylanders of the Century series -- profiles of 21 people who made key contributions to the community and society. We also asked readers to contribute their own Marylanders of note. Here is a selection of the responses we received:DURING the first half of the 20th century, Dr. Claribel Cone and Etta Cone accumulated one of the most renowned collections of modern art ever assembled.Upon their deaths, resisting ardent appeals by museum directors in New York, the sisters left their collection of more than 3,000 works by Matisse, Picasso, Cezanne, van Gogh, Gauguin and many other important figures to the Baltimore Museum of Art.The world-renowned Cone Collection has become the cornerstone of the BMA's collection and has inspired scores of art lovers to visit Baltimore for nearly 50 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 18, 1999
Ask anyone how Doreen Bolger is doing after a year and a half on the job as director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the question is likely to come back to the issue of frames. The Matisse frames, that is.After a major building renovation in 1986, then-BMA director Arnold Lehman and his deputy director, Brenda Richardson, removed the original gilt frames from the museum's famed Cone Collection of Impressionist paintings and replaced them with modern metal frames, arguing that they more closely reflected the artist's intent.
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