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By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A jury on Monday evening said that a national homebuilder owes $5.6 million to an Anne Arundel County condo association because their condominium complex was poorly constructed, according to the association's attorney. Following a five week trial and testimony from more than two dozen residents of the Eden Brook Condominiums in Odenton, a jury determined that Virginia-based NVR Inc., which does business as Ryan Homes, NVHomes and Fox Ridge Homes, should pay homeowners for defective construction and misrepresentations about the quality of the complex's construction, said attorney T. Allen Mott, of the Baltimore law firm Cowie & Mott.
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BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
When Mark and Lisa Struble bought their Little Italy condo last year, they were attracted by the open layout, proximity to the waterfront - and the promise of a steep property tax break into 2016. But in July they got a shock in the mail from the city Finance Department: Their tax credit was suddenly gone. And their annual tax bill, which they thought would be around $1,800, had soared to more than $15,400 - a 760-percent increase. "I was incredulous," said Mark Struble, who moved with his wife from Ohio after she got a job in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
When Mark and Lisa Struble bought their Little Italy condo last year, they were attracted by the open layout, proximity to the waterfront - and the promise of a steep property tax break into 2016. But in July they got a shock in the mail from the city Finance Department: Their tax credit was suddenly gone. And their annual tax bill, which they thought would be around $1,800, had soared to more than $15,400 - a 760-percent increase. "I was incredulous," said Mark Struble, who moved with his wife from Ohio after she got a job in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
Saying a heavy snowfall could collapse the roofs over their heads, homeowners at The Pointe condominiums in Abingdon have asked a court to order repairs.The Pointe Condominium Council of Unit Owners, representing the homeowners, seeks a Harford Circuit Court order to force the developer, builder and engineer to repair six buildings' roofs by Nov. 1.An Illinois architectural firm the condo owners hired to inspect the buildings concluded a heavy snowfall would collapse the roofs because of faulty trusses.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1991
Owners of condominiums at Annen Woods in Pikesville have won a $3.05 million damage award against the builder of their units in a breach of warranty action in Baltimore County Circuit Court.The jury award yesterday, one of the largest to be awarded in the county court, is to go toward repairing defective walls and windows at the 76-unit condominium at 1 and 2 High Stepper Court."It's been a long battle," said Jack Eisen, president of the condominium association that brought suit in 1986 against Jonas Brody and Four Villages Limited Partnership, the developer of the property.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1997
Condo owners locked in a bizarre three-year power struggle over their Severn parcel may be a step closer today to a truce.For more than two years, two separate condominium organizations have each acted as if it was in charge of the 24 townhouses of Warfield 2-E off Pioneer Drive, answering to different boards of directors and collecting different fees. Confounded bank officials dragged the two sides before a judge in 1995 for a settlement of the property war.The case amounts to a "tempest in a teapot," costing more to litigate than the amount of money at stake, said a lawyer for Mohammad Zuberi, an Ellicott City resident and property owner who is at the center of dispute.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 9, 1992
The way Parr's Ridge condominium owners see it, they pay Westminster property taxes based on the same rate as all other city property owners, but do not get the same services.So, they would like a tax abatement to compensate for approximately $11,200 a year they spend on trash collection, snow removal and street lighting.City officials plan to study the request, but their initial answer is that Parr's Ridge is a private development and is not one of the types of housing units where the city provides trash collection.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
The developers and warranty company of a troubled northwestern Baltimore County condominium project have agreed to a $4.2 million settlement on the eve of a jury trial on allegations of consumer law violations and shoddy work. Condo owners say the money is enough to pay legal fees and make structural repairs.The owners of the Club at McDonogh Township condominiums voted Sunday to accept the settlement offer on the suit, which alleged negligent construction, fraud, breach of warranties and violations of the Maryland Consumer Protection Act.The development, built 10 years ago, has problems that include water and air leaks, ill-fitting windows and doors, hazardous fireplaces, water-damaged siding and leaking heat pumps.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1997
Mary Ellen Berry is looking forward to a home where the wind doesn't whistle through the windows and the entryway ceiling hasn't collapsed.June Thorne can't wait to warm her kitchen with a safe fireplace.And Lynn Sapperstein is grateful that the starlings will no longer be uninvited visitors in her living room.The three women live in the troubled Club at McDonogh Township condominiums in northwest Baltimore County, where the condo association is about to spend $4.2 million -- obtained in a lawsuit condominium owners filed against the developer -- to retrofit its eight buildings.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The No. 1 one amenity the Ritz-Carlton Residences offers its condo owners is fabulous views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor. For resident Haley Adams, the water is the star, the leading lady in her created environment, where all the furnishings surrounding her are simply supporting players. "The movement of the water is constantly captivating; the way it reflects lights and colors draws you in," she said. "There is a new view every day. On some nights, the water is so still, it looks like glass, reflecting the buildings around it like a mirror.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Apartment renters should be aware that rental properties in Howard County will be assessed for the stormwater management tax as commercial properties, which will be based on the measurement of impervious surfaces. Since it may be assumed that landlords will pass these fees on to tenants as rent increases, in may cases apartment dwellers may be paying more than the flat fee of $15 per year to be paid by condominium owners. Apartment renters are already at a disadvantage because they cannot deduct real estate taxes paid by owners from income taxes, so this is a further affront to renters.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2012
CA spokesperson David Greisman's letter concerning CA staff's proposed legislation to exempt itself from the Maryland Homeowners Association Act (MHAA) is Orwellian doublespeak ("Editorial, cartoon on proposed CA reclassification missed mark," Nov. 22). The facts speak for themselves. Greisman claims that CA is already more transparent than the MHAA requires. However, an example of CA's fake transparency policy is CA's continuing failure to provide data on employee compensation pursuant to a request some three years ago by the Alliance for a Better Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A jury on Monday evening said that a national homebuilder owes $5.6 million to an Anne Arundel County condo association because their condominium complex was poorly constructed, according to the association's attorney. Following a five week trial and testimony from more than two dozen residents of the Eden Brook Condominiums in Odenton, a jury determined that Virginia-based NVR Inc., which does business as Ryan Homes, NVHomes and Fox Ridge Homes, should pay homeowners for defective construction and misrepresentations about the quality of the complex's construction, said attorney T. Allen Mott, of the Baltimore law firm Cowie & Mott.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2011
The condos at the Ritz-Carlton Residences offer "luxurious waterfront living" — with breathtaking views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor and amenities that include marble baths, landscaped terraces and butler's pantries with access for the help. But that's not enough for one resident. An architect has been talking to city officials about permits that might be needed to build a gun range in one of the penthouse-level condos on Key Highway, at the foot of Federal Hill. Inquiries about the gun range were meant to be hush-hush, but word about the unusual request got out quickly.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2010
Twelve years ago, Ralph and Carolyn Clark decided to downsize. "My husband and I found our dream home back in 1998 at the grand ages of 53 and 54," Carolyn Clark said. "We left behind our home of 27 years and moved to a condo in White Marsh and haven't looked back since!" Rather than continuing to invest money in repairs to their Overlea bungalow, the active empty-nesters bought their White Marsh condominium, sight unseen, after touring the sales office model. They paid $122,000 for what they laughingly call their "lock it and leave it" home, which features two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a sunroom, in addition to living and dining rooms, open kitchen and walk-out balcony.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1999
Ocean City's famed Carousel Hotel & Resort is scheduled to be auctioned Monday, the result of a showdown between the Pennsylvania heart surgeon who owns the hotel and a court-appointed receiver who contends that the 21-story building needs millions of dollars in repairs.The foreclosure sale is linked to a legal tug-of-war between Dr. Siamak Hamzavi of Scranton, Pa., the owner of the Carousel's 264-room hotel, and the owners of the property's 190 condominium units.The condominium owners, who succeeded in persuading a Worcester County judge to name a receiver to sort out the Carousel's financial problems, contend that Hamzavi has failed to maintain the property, even to the point of not paying necessary services such as electricity.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Apartment renters should be aware that rental properties in Howard County will be assessed for the stormwater management tax as commercial properties, which will be based on the measurement of impervious surfaces. Since it may be assumed that landlords will pass these fees on to tenants as rent increases, in may cases apartment dwellers may be paying more than the flat fee of $15 per year to be paid by condominium owners. Apartment renters are already at a disadvantage because they cannot deduct real estate taxes paid by owners from income taxes, so this is a further affront to renters.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,sun reporter | March 17, 2007
Jack Ritter wasn't trying to stir up a neighborhood-wide protest. He just wanted to appeal his property assessment. But word got around, and people kept asking: Can I join in? Now the owners of 19 homes in his Reisterstown neighborhood - a third of the Glyndon Trace condominiums - are appealing as a group. It's a rare but perfectly acceptable way to argue for lower property assessments, the state says. "It seems like it happened spontaneously," said Ritter, 79, a telephone company retiree whose assessment rose more than 70 percent.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
A long-planned Ritz-Carlton luxury condominium complex on what may be the most desirable undeveloped Inner Harbor setting still available - at the foot of Federal Hill - is finally getting under way. The developers said they closed on the purchase of the property and finalized funding for the $155 million project yesterday afternoon. The development's 165 units are expected to sell at prices from $600,000 to $3 million. The project, viewed as a potential landmark contribution to Baltimore's redevelopment, has been dogged for years by legal and financial disputes.
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