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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | January 23, 2008
Wilma Stoffle of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for cookies like the ones her mother made many years ago using cornflakes, peanut butter and sweetened condensed milk. She remembered that the cookies were "sticky, very tasty and somewhat chewy," but neither she nor her mother could remember exactly how to make them. Debbie Iverson of Pasadena thinks she has the recipe that Stoffle wants. She got it from a call-in radio show when she lived in California in the '80s. These rich little goodies certainly match the description.
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Maryland Family Magazine | November 27, 2012
It's probably safe to say that most moms have a favorite holiday recipe … one that evokes a fond memory of baking or a sumptuous smell. Managing editor, Jennifer Broadwater and editor, Jennifer Dansicker thought they would reminisce and share their favorite recipes from their holiday menu. SARALEE'S MUNDEL BREAD Serves 8 (158g per serving) Jennifer K. Dansicker, editor “I choose a traditional Jewish dessert that can be made in many variations, but it is very similar to a biscotti.
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FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
Avoid the last minute Christmas-shopping panic and whip up some of these easy gifts.Here's the ultimate fast and easy gift. Buy good quality shortbread or other plain cookies, an eight-ounce package of chocolate morsels and about two cups finely chopped nuts.Melt chocolate, a little at a time, in the microwave or in a double boiler. Dip one edge of the cookies in the chocolate and then in the chopped nuts. Let sit on wax paper until hardened. Store at room temperature until hardened.These quick and easy liqueurs are deliciously simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Fran Merkley from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making coconut macaroons that she thought may have been published in this column around 15 years ago. The cookies were made with flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk, and could be made in chocolate or vanilla flavors. What stuck with her about the recipe, aside from how delicious the cookies were, was that the woman who sent it in said it was the job of her younger sibling to put the cherry on each cookie. We searched The Baltimore Sun's archives and located a recipe for chocolate cherry macaroons that appeared in paper in December 1992 in a column called Kids in the Kitchen written by Beth Hillson.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 2, 1994
If the menu includes borscht, potato pancakes, chicken Kiev and stuffed cabbage, the place must be Russia -- unless it's the annual Russian Festival at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church, 1723 Fairmount Ave., on Oct. 15-16. There will also be a Russian tea room, religious items and dancing by Moryana. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. For more information, call (410) 276-6171.Baking for TVYou've heard of America's funniest videos -- now how about America's yummiest videos? Create an original baked goodie using M&Ms Mini Chocolate Baking Bits and star in a three-minute video of the preparation, and you could win $10,000.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2006
Dian Mehrer from Rapid City, S.D., was seeking a recipe for "Jeans Bars." These rich bar cookies were made with lots of butter, sweetened condensed milk, chocolate chips and nuts, and had a shortbreadlike bottom layer. She said they are "guaranteed to make your jeans tight - thus the name." Ruth Charles, also of Rapid City, had the recipe Mehrer was looking for. It came from the 1983 Pillsbury Classic, No. 30, "Best Recipes." She says that she has made this recipe with great success many times and that it has been a family favorite.
FEATURES
Maryland Family Magazine | November 27, 2012
It's probably safe to say that most moms have a favorite holiday recipe … one that evokes a fond memory of baking or a sumptuous smell. Managing editor, Jennifer Broadwater and editor, Jennifer Dansicker thought they would reminisce and share their favorite recipes from their holiday menu. SARALEE'S MUNDEL BREAD Serves 8 (158g per serving) Jennifer K. Dansicker, editor “I choose a traditional Jewish dessert that can be made in many variations, but it is very similar to a biscotti.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamison and Patsy Jamison,Eating Well Magazine | March 8, 1995
"We have tried to convert this recipe to one that more closely fits our new and healthier lifestyle, but without success," wrote one of our readers. Her recipe for Creme Renversee (flan) bakes an eggy custard mixture in a caramel-lined dish. Its richness comes from four jumbo eggs, fresh whole milk and sweetened condensed whole milk.Sweetened condensed milk was developed in 1853 as a method for keeping milk from spoiling. In our refrigerated age, the product has found a new niche as an ingredient in creamy, sweet desserts, such as flan, homemade vanilla ice cream, cheesecake, caramel candies and Key Lime pie. But its high butterfat content is a disadvantage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Fran Merkley from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for making coconut macaroons that she thought may have been published in this column around 15 years ago. The cookies were made with flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk, and could be made in chocolate or vanilla flavors. What stuck with her about the recipe, aside from how delicious the cookies were, was that the woman who sent it in said it was the job of her younger sibling to put the cherry on each cookie. We searched The Baltimore Sun's archives and located a recipe for chocolate cherry macaroons that appeared in paper in December 1992 in a column called Kids in the Kitchen written by Beth Hillson.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | January 11, 2006
Kumquats are not mini oranges, though you may think so when you see those cute little guys in produce markets. They actually have their own genus, Fortunella, and are not a member of the citrus genus, according to Elizabeth Schneider in Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables: A Commonsense Guide. "It is the only fruit with a rind that is deliciously sweet and pulp that is puckery-sour!" she wrote. For those reasons, the fruit can be eaten whole, though the overall taste can be sour. The Kumquat Growers Association says that kumquats taste better if they are gently rolled between the fingers before being eaten to release essential oils in the rinds.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | January 23, 2008
Wilma Stoffle of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for cookies like the ones her mother made many years ago using cornflakes, peanut butter and sweetened condensed milk. She remembered that the cookies were "sticky, very tasty and somewhat chewy," but neither she nor her mother could remember exactly how to make them. Debbie Iverson of Pasadena thinks she has the recipe that Stoffle wants. She got it from a call-in radio show when she lived in California in the '80s. These rich little goodies certainly match the description.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2006
Dian Mehrer from Rapid City, S.D., was seeking a recipe for "Jeans Bars." These rich bar cookies were made with lots of butter, sweetened condensed milk, chocolate chips and nuts, and had a shortbreadlike bottom layer. She said they are "guaranteed to make your jeans tight - thus the name." Ruth Charles, also of Rapid City, had the recipe Mehrer was looking for. It came from the 1983 Pillsbury Classic, No. 30, "Best Recipes." She says that she has made this recipe with great success many times and that it has been a family favorite.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | January 11, 2006
Kumquats are not mini oranges, though you may think so when you see those cute little guys in produce markets. They actually have their own genus, Fortunella, and are not a member of the citrus genus, according to Elizabeth Schneider in Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables: A Commonsense Guide. "It is the only fruit with a rind that is deliciously sweet and pulp that is puckery-sour!" she wrote. For those reasons, the fruit can be eaten whole, though the overall taste can be sour. The Kumquat Growers Association says that kumquats taste better if they are gently rolled between the fingers before being eaten to release essential oils in the rinds.
FEATURES
By Patsy Jamison and Patsy Jamison,Eating Well Magazine | March 8, 1995
"We have tried to convert this recipe to one that more closely fits our new and healthier lifestyle, but without success," wrote one of our readers. Her recipe for Creme Renversee (flan) bakes an eggy custard mixture in a caramel-lined dish. Its richness comes from four jumbo eggs, fresh whole milk and sweetened condensed whole milk.Sweetened condensed milk was developed in 1853 as a method for keeping milk from spoiling. In our refrigerated age, the product has found a new niche as an ingredient in creamy, sweet desserts, such as flan, homemade vanilla ice cream, cheesecake, caramel candies and Key Lime pie. But its high butterfat content is a disadvantage.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 2, 1994
If the menu includes borscht, potato pancakes, chicken Kiev and stuffed cabbage, the place must be Russia -- unless it's the annual Russian Festival at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church, 1723 Fairmount Ave., on Oct. 15-16. There will also be a Russian tea room, religious items and dancing by Moryana. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. For more information, call (410) 276-6171.Baking for TVYou've heard of America's funniest videos -- now how about America's yummiest videos? Create an original baked goodie using M&Ms Mini Chocolate Baking Bits and star in a three-minute video of the preparation, and you could win $10,000.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1991
MAILING HOME-BAKED cookies is an art in itself. Here are some pointers from the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland System.* Sturdy bar and drop cookies, such as chocolate chip cookies, are better travelers then fragile cookies.* Wrap, package and mail your treats as soon as you can after they are made and cooled.* Use a container such as a strong cardboard box, plastic or metal food container with a tight-fitting lid. A clean coffee or shortening can works fine.* Line the container with waxed paper or plastic wrap and place a thick cushion of crumpled wax paper on the bottom.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1991
MAILING HOME-BAKED cookies is an art in itself. Here are some pointers from the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Maryland System.* Sturdy bar and drop cookies, such as chocolate chip cookies, are better travelers then fragile cookies.* Wrap, package and mail your treats as soon as you can after they are made and cooled.* Use a container such as a strong cardboard box, plastic or metal food container with a tight-fitting lid. A clean coffee or shortening can works fine.* Line the container with waxed paper or plastic wrap and place a thick cushion of crumpled wax paper on the bottom.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
At the risk of sounding older than I really am, I remember the days before lime became chic, when fresh limes were hard to find and most cooks had to make do with the sour juice in a fruit-shaped squeeze bottle.That was before la nouvelle cuisine made lime the premier citrus fruit of the '80s. It was also before Perrier, with its inevitable wedge of lime, became the quaff of a nation. Few Northerners had ever tasted a Key lime. As for the perfumed kaffir lime from Thailand, it might as well have grown on the moon.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
Avoid the last minute Christmas-shopping panic and whip up some of these easy gifts.Here's the ultimate fast and easy gift. Buy good quality shortbread or other plain cookies, an eight-ounce package of chocolate morsels and about two cups finely chopped nuts.Melt chocolate, a little at a time, in the microwave or in a double boiler. Dip one edge of the cookies in the chocolate and then in the chopped nuts. Let sit on wax paper until hardened. Store at room temperature until hardened.These quick and easy liqueurs are deliciously simple.
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