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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 27, 2007
In a catastrophically messy action-movie mash-up, The Dirty Dozen meets Survivor and The Most Dangerous Game in The Condemned. This World Wrestling Entertainment production starring "Stone Cold" Steve Austin marks the first time this year I walked into an advance screening of an elaborate American action film and wasn't wanded for cell phones or recording devices. Maybe that's because 90 percent of the action scenes look, sound and move as if they were shot, mixed and edited on a BlackBerry.
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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
One year ago, Annapolis housing inspectors ran out of patience with the owners of the Bay Ridge Gardens apartments. After repeated warnings, they condemned the 196-unit complex March 19, 1993.Today, Bay Ridge has new owners and is undergoing a yearlong, $12 million renovation.Apartments are being gutted, and heat and electric systems updated. Foundations are being laid for a new community center and a laundry.But even more important, say the new owners and residents, is that a new community is being born.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Thirty-five state lawmakers on Thursday issued a statement condemning Del. Jon S. Cardin for missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes this year.  "As members of the Maryland House of Delegates and State Senate, we must comment on the recent articles about Jon Cardin's missed votes," states a letter signed by lawmakers who support Cardin's opponent in a race for attorney general, Sen. Brian Frosh. "We have been trying to wrap our heads around his unacceptable attendance record and want to say clearly and unequivocally: under no circumstances should a member of the legislature selectively decide to skip 75% of his or her committee votes.
NEWS
By Doug Smith and Saif Hameed and Doug Smith and Saif Hameed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 13, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. officials yesterday sidestepped the demand of Iraq's prime minister for the immediate handover for execution of three former officials from Saddam Hussein's regime. The U.S. military issued a written statement reaffirming the position of the military and U.S. Embassy that the three condemned men would remain in U.S. custody until the Iraqi government has sorted out disputed procedures for death sentences handed down by Iraq's high tribunal for war crimes. The three men received death sentences in June for their roles in Hussein's internal campaigns during the 1980s that killed up to 180,000 Kurds.
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By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1999
In the drug-troubled East Baltimore neighborhood locals call "Zombieland," residents trudge by 2417 E. Biddle St., a condemned rowhouse with a Formstone facade, assuming the boarded-up building is the least of their worries.On weekdays, scores of grade-school children pass the building on their way to and from Dr. Rayner Browne Elementary School around the corner. They sometimes play in the dirt and rubble surrounding it. On Sundays, about 100 worshipers skirt the property on their way to service across the street at Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church.
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By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Speaking in unusually forceful terms, President Clinton condemned the Oklahoma City bombing as "an attack on the United States" and vowed that punishment would be "swift and certain and severe."Mr. Clinton repeatedly cautioned Americans yesterday against jumping to conclusions about who was responsible. Addressing fears by Arab-Americans of a backlash against their community, he said authorities still do not know who was behind the attack and warned the public not to "stereotype anyone."
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 16, 1992
Even in his own heyday, the late 19th century, when his paintings won highest prizes at international expositions and earned him a knighthood from Queen Victoria, Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema was by no means universally admired.His scenes of everyday life in ancient Rome, furnished with archaeologically correct details and filled with people based on healthy English models, found eager British and American buyers, including William Walters in Baltimore. But Whistler, always ready with the killer quip, dismissed the work as "Five-o'clock-tea antiquity," and Sargent went if possible even further: "It is clever . . . but of course it's not art in any sense whatever."
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By Kurt Streeter and By Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
When the rowhouse at 2417 E. Biddle St. came tumbling down recently, a congregation praised God, a grandmother breathed a little easier, and a neighborhood felt things were just a bit safer.The decrepit Formstone building in the heart of a blighted East Baltimore neighborhood known as "Zombieland" has been razed, and city workers are clearing the rubble from the lot where it once stood."We're all elated here now," said Donna Money, president of the Lakewood Chase Community Association and a member of the Bibleway Missionary Baptist Church.
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By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Fourteen people were forced to move yesterday when city housing officials condemned an apartment building shortly after a car ran into a rear wall of the structure.Police said the 1994 Cadillac was traveling in reverse on Riggs Avenue just before noon when it backed into the wall of the three-story rowhouse in the 1000 block of N. Stricker St. One unidentified occupant of the building was injured and taken to Bon Secours Hospital, authorities said.Despite the crash, many occupants of the building's four apartments remained inside until ordered out by housing officials.
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By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 18, 2014
A hypothetical scenario: Your little boy lies in a hospital bed, stricken by a mysterious, potentially fatal disease. You are frightened and in despair. But your community rallies around you. Soon, the whole town is talking about your ordeal. Neighbors you've never spoken to send cards. Co-workers you've never socialized with send encouraging text messages. None of it changes the objective fact of your son's condition, doesn't kill a virus, lessen a fever or ease his pain.
NEWS
May 10, 2014
Why is it the convicted criminals get all the sympathy from some segments of the public? ( "Death penalty limbo," April 29.) The "hysteria" over a humane way to execute a heinous, cold blooded killer is almost hysterical. The way that was developed to humanely execute a criminal has been torn apart by liberal judicial officials. No problem, Maryland still has the gas chamber that just needs some minor repairs and inspection and could be operational. Florida and some other states have the electric chair, hanging is still on the books in some states, and in Utah the firing squad is an option.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Nolan H. Rogers, a former Duke University lacrosse star who later became a Maryland assistant attorney general and the official tour guide and historian for Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died May 2 of complications from cancer at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 82. "Obviously, Nolan was present at the creation of the Camden Yards project, for which he did all of the land acquisition. He played a very important role in the development of the project," said Michael J. Frenz executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
When Ron Tanner, an author and writing professor at Loyola University Maryland, purchased a condemned Victorian brownstone in Charles Village 14 years ago (against his real estate agent's advice), he knew nothing about restoration. The fact that the three-story rowhouse belonged to - and was trashed by - a college fraternity over a decade did not deter him and his then-girlfriend, Jill Eicher. In fact, they made it their mission to save the home from further destruction and restore it to its 1897 glory.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Jean H. Hepner, an early Fells Point community activist who restored one of its residential landmarks and fought a planned interstate highway, died of injuries she suffered as a passenger in an automobile accident Feb. 1 on the Baltimore Beltway at Park Heights Avenue. She was 90. Family members said Jean Rose Harvey was the first child born in Wisconsin in 1924. She was born in Milwaukee at eight minutes after midnight on Jan. 1. She was the daughter of James D. Harvey, a radio store owner who wrote a broadcasting column for the Milwaukee Journal, and Rhea Carson Blake, an occupational therapist.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 9, 2014
The elderly woman who lives in the van in the shopping center on 41st Street in Hampden is Harriet Kahn. It says "Kahn" on the vanity plates of her van, but "Can" is how she pronounces her name because, she says, the softer "ah" (as in "Kaan") gives her name a pretentiousness she dislikes. Ms. Kahn is at most 5 feet tall; she says she'll be 80 in late March. She has small hands. Her hair is straight and gray; she keeps it wrapped with a scarf on cold days. She has sharp features and dark eyes with a certain savvy spark.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2007
Hollywood has done what the biggest and baddest professional wrestlers never could. It got a hold on "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and wouldn't let go until he gave in. The former World Wrestling Entertainment competitor, who said in a 2003 interview that if a good acting role "got dumped in my lap, I'm cool with that, but it's not something I care to pursue," now hopes to pin down a career as an action star. Austin, who was at the forefront of the wrestling boom in the late 1990s before neck injuries forced him out of the ring four years ago, makes his debut as a lead actor in the action thriller The Condemned, which opens today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2002
HYDERABAD, Pakistan - With security heavy and officials bracing for a retaliatory attack, the man condemned to death yesterday for the kidnapping and murder of American reporter Daniel Pearl called on fellow Muslims to take revenge for the sentence. "We shall see who will die first - either I or the authorities who arranged the death sentence for me," the condemned man, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, 28, said in a statement read by one of his lawyers here after the sentence was handed down. "The war between Islam and nonbelievers is going on, and everyone should show whether he is in favor of Islam or in favor of nonbelievers," the statement said, as Islamic groups in Pakistan expressed outrage at the verdict.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
Reader Paul Streckfus is wrong to fault former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for criticizing the Internal Revenue Service after it targeted conservative groups for special scrutiny ("Ehrlich wrong about IRS," June 23). This is a matter of our government going after its own citizens. It is indeed a scandal. This goes well beyond concerns over organizational exemptions. And there probably never will be any proven connection between the IRS and the Obama White House beyond the enormous and telling number of meetings held there.
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Letter to The Aegis | May 28, 2013
The Harford County Republican Central Committee earlier this year approved a resolution relating to Senate Bill 236 and recently provided a copy for publication. The resolution affirms citizens private property rights, condemns the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 (Senate Bill 236) AKA "The Septic Bill. " The nonbinding resolution, already had been passed by the Republican National Committee. Essentially the nonbinding resolution addresses [United Nations]
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