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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
A three-alarm fire raced through a concrete plant in Curtis Bay yesterday morning, causing one building to collapse and severely damaging another building, along with a conveyor and a concrete hopper, fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire, which caused about $2 million in damage to the plant owned by Universal Engineering and Construction Inc. of Curtis Bay. Machado Construction Co. has run the plant for about a year. The blaze was reported at 5:45 a.m. in the first block of Stahls Point Road.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 6, 2010
Thirty-five years have come and gone since Dan Schuster, just out of high school in Reisterstown, discovered something about the concrete business — he could do it better himself. In the early 1970s, Mr. Schuster was an upstart contractor with a pickup truck, a shed full of tools and perpetually dirty pants. He and his crew set up forms for concrete. They poured concrete. They finished concrete. They also spent way too much time waiting for concrete to arrive at job sites.
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NEWS
March 28, 1996
A man accused of distributing crack cocaine in Westminster is being held on $50,000 bond at the Carroll County Detention Center after he was arrested at his O'Donnell Heights home in Southeast Baltimore by Westminster police Tuesday night.Westminster police said they obtained an arrest warrant for Robert Lamont Bryant, 19, of the 1200 block of Gregor Way after linking him to a Westminster woman with whom he recently lived.On March 20, Westminster officers raided the woman's residence on West Green Street in Westminster and reported finding a safe containing crack and powder cocaine, two handguns, a sawed-off shotgun and paraphernalia used to weigh and package narcotics.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
A three-alarm fire raced through a concrete plant in Curtis Bay yesterday morning, causing one building to collapse and severely damaging another building, along with a conveyor and a concrete hopper, fire officials said. No one was injured in the fire, which caused about $2 million in damage to the plant owned by Universal Engineering and Construction Inc. of Curtis Bay. Machado Construction Co. has run the plant for about a year. The blaze was reported at 5:45 a.m. in the first block of Stahls Point Road.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 27, 2001
NOBODY NEEDS a psychoanalyst to explain that weekend pep rally for Matthew and Dominic Geckle, who seem to have taken the law into their own hands. Though police say the brothers shot one man dead and wounded two others, about 75 people gathered Sunday in Essex to support them and express their contempt over any possible criminal charges. The crowd was speaking for a lot of people, none of whom (on either side of the current debate) knows exactly what happened -- or why -- in that flash of gunfire eight nights ago in the darkness of a Baltimore County concrete plant.
NEWS
April 5, 2010
Thirty-five years have come and gone since Dan Schuster, just out of high school in Reisterstown, discovered something about the concrete business — he could do it better himself. In the early 1970s, Mr. Schuster was an upstart contractor with a pickup truck, a shed full of tools and perpetually dirty pants. He and his crew set up forms for concrete. They poured concrete. They finished concrete. They also spent way too much time waiting for concrete to arrive at job sites.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
Over lunch in Owings Mill in December, two pairs of business owners met to discuss a matter of mutual interest. Not depreciation schedules or benefit packages or ways to cut energy costs. Homicide is what occupied them. Matt and Tony Geckle initiated the meeting. Normally, the brothers might concede that their expertise does not extend much beyond the busy cement plant they own just north of the city. But, you learn a few things after you've killed a man in your place of business, and so they felt they had something to impart to the other two men. Kenny Der and Darrell Kifer refinish furniture in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
The Crofton Civic Association has decided not to appeal a state decision allowing a concrete and asphalt recycling plant on Route 3.After months of negotiations that culminated in a hurried round of talks at the end of last week, the association directors convened in a rare holiday meeting Monday night and decided NTC the company had done enough to appease the community.Town Manager Jordan Harding said representatives of E.L. Gardner Inc. agreed to new demands that the board insisted on at a meeting last Tuesday.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 2001
NEW YORK - City officials and construction executives are considering building concrete plants on the waterfront in Manhattan for the first time in more than a decade because traffic jams on bridges have stalled trucks' delivery of concrete to building sites and have idled hundreds of workers. The city is also considering providing police escorts to help clear the way for the 79,000-pound trucks as they rumble between concrete plants in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx and destinations at commercial and residential projects in Manhattan.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
In a cost-cutting move, Saks Inc. will end its catalog operation and lay off up to 350 workers in February at its Aberdeen distribution center, the retailer said yesterday. The 4-year-old warehouse employs 900 workers in merchandise distribution, catalog and finance divisions, said Carolyn deLong, vice president of human resources for Saks in Aberdeen. In another blow to the Harford County economy, Price Brothers Co. said yesterday that it plans to close its concrete pipe plant in Perryman in the first quarter of next year and move production to its other facilities throughout the country.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
Over lunch in Owings Mill in December, two pairs of business owners met to discuss a matter of mutual interest. Not depreciation schedules or benefit packages or ways to cut energy costs. Homicide is what occupied them. Matt and Tony Geckle initiated the meeting. Normally, the brothers might concede that their expertise does not extend much beyond the busy cement plant they own just north of the city. But, you learn a few things after you've killed a man in your place of business, and so they felt they had something to impart to the other two men. Kenny Der and Darrell Kifer refinish furniture in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 2001
NEW YORK - City officials and construction executives are considering building concrete plants on the waterfront in Manhattan for the first time in more than a decade because traffic jams on bridges have stalled trucks' delivery of concrete to building sites and have idled hundreds of workers. The city is also considering providing police escorts to help clear the way for the 79,000-pound trucks as they rumble between concrete plants in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx and destinations at commercial and residential projects in Manhattan.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2001
In a cost-cutting move, Saks Inc. will end its catalog operation and lay off up to 350 workers in February at its Aberdeen distribution center, the retailer said yesterday. The 4-year-old warehouse employs 900 workers in merchandise distribution, catalog and finance divisions, said Carolyn deLong, vice president of human resources for Saks in Aberdeen. In another blow to the Harford County economy, Price Brothers Co. said yesterday that it plans to close its concrete pipe plant in Perryman in the first quarter of next year and move production to its other facilities throughout the country.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 27, 2001
NOBODY NEEDS a psychoanalyst to explain that weekend pep rally for Matthew and Dominic Geckle, who seem to have taken the law into their own hands. Though police say the brothers shot one man dead and wounded two others, about 75 people gathered Sunday in Essex to support them and express their contempt over any possible criminal charges. The crowd was speaking for a lot of people, none of whom (on either side of the current debate) knows exactly what happened -- or why -- in that flash of gunfire eight nights ago in the darkness of a Baltimore County concrete plant.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
A man accused of distributing crack cocaine in Westminster is being held on $50,000 bond at the Carroll County Detention Center after he was arrested at his O'Donnell Heights home in Southeast Baltimore by Westminster police Tuesday night.Westminster police said they obtained an arrest warrant for Robert Lamont Bryant, 19, of the 1200 block of Gregor Way after linking him to a Westminster woman with whom he recently lived.On March 20, Westminster officers raided the woman's residence on West Green Street in Westminster and reported finding a safe containing crack and powder cocaine, two handguns, a sawed-off shotgun and paraphernalia used to weigh and package narcotics.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
The Crofton Civic Association has decided not to appeal a state decision allowing a concrete and asphalt recycling plant on Route 3.After months of negotiations that culminated in a hurried round of talks at the end of last week, the association directors convened in a rare holiday meeting Monday night and decided NTC the company had done enough to appease the community.Town Manager Jordan Harding said representatives of E.L. Gardner Inc. agreed to new demands that the board insisted on at a meeting last Tuesday.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Neighbors of a proposed Finksburg concrete plant say they plan to turn out in force tomorrow to ask the county's zoning appeals board to scuttle the project.Toma Concrete and Materials Inc. of Harrisburg, Pa., is seeking approval for a concrete plant on a 12.6-acre industrial property, owned by Carroll County Terminals Inc., in the 2600 block of Emory Road."We bought out here 12 years ago. We've got a lovely home here," said Hollingsworth Road resident Mildred Hummel. She is worried that the concrete plant would decrease the value of her property by bringing noise and truck traffic to the neighborhood.
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