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NEWS
September 28, 2007
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra 2007-08 season will feature the following subscription performances, all conducted by Maestro Jose-Luis Novo at 8 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts: Tonight and tomorrow: Battle of the Titans, featuring violinist Soovin Kim. The program includes Beethoven's Coriolan Overture, Brahms' Violin Concerto in D Major and Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra. Nov. 9-10: Masters of Melody, featuring pianist Jon Nakamatsu. The program includes the world premiere of Dan Visconti's The Breadth of Breaking Waves, Grieg's Piano Concerto in A Minor and Dvorak's Symphony No. 7. Feb. 15-16: Bittersweet Beauty, featuring cellist Julie Albers.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 3, 2009
Although it's convenient for some to think of music being divided into totally separate worlds, with the classical variety way over in some isolated corner where only the "elite" indulge in it, there are innumerable connecting, welcoming points between genres. One mission of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's new season is to emphasize such links, programming works that reveal roots planted in folk music or jazz, for example. Last week, bluegrass found its way into the picture via a concerto by Jennifer Higdon featuring a hotshot crossover trio; this week, the folk influences behind familiar pieces by Tchaikovsky and Bartok are being given fresh attention.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 17, 2008
Joan Tower has run into a string of bad luck recently, which is unusual for her. She's the remarkably successful composer whose distinctions include the $200,000 Grawemeyer Award in Composition in 1990 (the first woman to receive that honor), and a Grammy this year for Best Classical Contemporary Composition - Made in America, on a Naxos recording that also took Grammys for Best Classical Album and Best Orchestral Performance. But Tower, due in town this week for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's performance of her Concerto for Orchestra, has been battling the flu, a knee injury and even tick-borne Lyme disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ISHITA SINGH] | June 19, 2008
The lowdown -- The Charles Theatre presents La Rondine as the latest entry in the La Scala Opera Series. Performed by Teatro La Fenice in Venice, Italy, Puccini's opera tells of a tragic love story between the courtesan Magda, played by Fiorenza Cedolins, and her lover, Ruggero, played by Massimo Giordano. If you go -- The opera will be shown at 12:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. June 29 at the theater, 1711 N. Charles St. Tickets are $21. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to the Sun | October 5, 2007
I confess that I walked into the opening concert of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's 47th season Friday night with my eyes rolling just a bit over management's decision to bill the evening as "Battle of the Titans." The titans, I suppose, were Beethoven, Brahms and Bartok, who are musical giants and whose works were up for discussion by director Jose-Luis Novo and his players. But a battle? Who would be fighting? Over what? Classical music is hurting. We all know that, and the ASO needs to sell tickets.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra opens its 47th season tonight and tomorrow with a program brought to you by the letter B. Maestro Jose-Luis Novo will begin his third year on the Maryland Hall podium by giving one of the most electrifying downbeats of the symphonic repertoire as his orchestra performs Beethoven's blisteringly intense Coriolan Overture. The music of Brahms is next, with the conductor and guest soloist Soovin Kim joining forces for the great German master's Violin Concerto in D Major.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
Gisele Ben-Dor begins her sixth and final season at the helm of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in the fall, and the repertoire and soloists she has chosen will provide her an opportunity to go out with the proverbial bang.Each of the five subscription programs places the ASO in the center of the mainstream repertoire with blockbuster masterworks lurking around every bend in the symphonic road.On Oct. 4 and 5, Stanley Drucker, the principal clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic who has made more than 100 solo New York performances in his illustrious career, will appear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ISHITA SINGH] | June 19, 2008
The lowdown -- The Charles Theatre presents La Rondine as the latest entry in the La Scala Opera Series. Performed by Teatro La Fenice in Venice, Italy, Puccini's opera tells of a tragic love story between the courtesan Magda, played by Fiorenza Cedolins, and her lover, Ruggero, played by Massimo Giordano. If you go -- The opera will be shown at 12:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. June 29 at the theater, 1711 N. Charles St. Tickets are $21. Call 410-727-3456 or go to thecharles.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1996
Conductor Ivan Fischer is a frequent visitor to the Baltimore Symphony, and his concert with the orchestra Thursday of music by Mozart, John Harbison and Bartok showed his talents in the best possible light.Harbison's "The Most Often Used Chords," which opened the evening, was an engaging tongue-in-cheek collection of every music theory cliche that has ever haunted students of music. It challenged listeners while seducing them. The scoring was for a Haydn-sized chamber orchestra, plus harp and some exotic mallet percussion, which added enough zip to keep listeners off-balance.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 3, 2009
Although it's convenient for some to think of music being divided into totally separate worlds, with the classical variety way over in some isolated corner where only the "elite" indulge in it, there are innumerable connecting, welcoming points between genres. One mission of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's new season is to emphasize such links, programming works that reveal roots planted in folk music or jazz, for example. Last week, bluegrass found its way into the picture via a concerto by Jennifer Higdon featuring a hotshot crossover trio; this week, the folk influences behind familiar pieces by Tchaikovsky and Bartok are being given fresh attention.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | June 17, 2008
Joan Tower has run into a string of bad luck recently, which is unusual for her. She's the remarkably successful composer whose distinctions include the $200,000 Grawemeyer Award in Composition in 1990 (the first woman to receive that honor), and a Grammy this year for Best Classical Contemporary Composition - Made in America, on a Naxos recording that also took Grammys for Best Classical Album and Best Orchestral Performance. But Tower, due in town this week for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's performance of her Concerto for Orchestra, has been battling the flu, a knee injury and even tick-borne Lyme disease.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to the Sun | October 5, 2007
I confess that I walked into the opening concert of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's 47th season Friday night with my eyes rolling just a bit over management's decision to bill the evening as "Battle of the Titans." The titans, I suppose, were Beethoven, Brahms and Bartok, who are musical giants and whose works were up for discussion by director Jose-Luis Novo and his players. But a battle? Who would be fighting? Over what? Classical music is hurting. We all know that, and the ASO needs to sell tickets.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra 2007-08 season will feature the following subscription performances, all conducted by Maestro Jose-Luis Novo at 8 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts: Tonight and tomorrow: Battle of the Titans, featuring violinist Soovin Kim. The program includes Beethoven's Coriolan Overture, Brahms' Violin Concerto in D Major and Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra. Nov. 9-10: Masters of Melody, featuring pianist Jon Nakamatsu. The program includes the world premiere of Dan Visconti's The Breadth of Breaking Waves, Grieg's Piano Concerto in A Minor and Dvorak's Symphony No. 7. Feb. 15-16: Bittersweet Beauty, featuring cellist Julie Albers.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra opens its 47th season tonight and tomorrow with a program brought to you by the letter B. Maestro Jose-Luis Novo will begin his third year on the Maryland Hall podium by giving one of the most electrifying downbeats of the symphonic repertoire as his orchestra performs Beethoven's blisteringly intense Coriolan Overture. The music of Brahms is next, with the conductor and guest soloist Soovin Kim joining forces for the great German master's Violin Concerto in D Major.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 4, 2003
Two powerhouses swept through the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Thursday night - composer Jennifer Higdon and pianist Lang Lang, the featured attractions on this week's National Symphony Orchestra program. Each left a long-lasting impression. Higdon's Concerto for Orchestra, written for the Philadelphia Orchestra and premiered by that ensemble last year, is a five-movement score that easily stakes a claim as one of the most inventive and substantive additions to American music in years. Even if there are a couple of spots that seem a little long-winded, the array of sound colors never ceases to grab the ear, while the brilliant working-out of ideas never ceases to impress.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 2, 2000
Jubilant Sykes is nothing if not aptly named. It's not just that the baritone exudes happiness; he generates it as well. That was evident Friday evening when he won over the crowd at Meyerhoff Hall for the Baltimore Symphony's latest program in the "Favorites" and "Classically Black" series. Sykes has a mellow voice that falls somewhere between Broadway and opera dimensions, and a distinctive way of styling that, if occasionally in danger of sounding mannered, certainly exudes personality.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | April 7, 1995
Many aficionados of great music need time to prepare for the concert season. So for those who would like to examine next year's Annapolis Symphony Orchestra repertoire in advance, I make these compact disc recommendations.Since Leon Fleisher will return to Annapolis to perform the Ravel Concerto for Left Hand, it seems only fitting to express my admiration for his Sony recording with Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony, a disc that includes two additional works by Britten and Prokofieff.For budget shoppers, there is a perfectly fine Naxos recording of the "Left Hand" combined with Ravel's irresistibly jazzy G major Concerto and De Falla's evocative "Nights in the Gardens of Spain."
NEWS
By David Lindauer and David Lindauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 1997
A notable era in the life of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra is about to end. Concerts tomorrow and Saturday in Maryland Hall will mark the end of Gisele Ben-Dor's six-season tenure as music director.When she joined the orchestra as its music director in the 1991-1992 season, she discovered that the orchestra had great potential and set about upgrading its standards. She also sought to introduce Annapolis to new sounds, playing works unfamiliar to local audiences.The innovative repertoire that Ben-Dor brought to Annapolis departed from the standard masterpieces of the Romantic era ** and gave her listeners a new awareness of music of the 20th century and, in particular, of American composers.
NEWS
By David Lindauer and David Lindauer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 1997
A notable era in the life of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra is about to end. Concerts tomorrow and Saturday in Maryland Hall will mark the end of Gisele Ben-Dor's six-season tenure as music director.When she joined the orchestra as its music director in the 1991-1992 season, she discovered that the orchestra had great potential and set about upgrading its standards. She also sought to introduce Annapolis to new sounds, playing works unfamiliar to local audiences.The innovative repertoire that Ben-Dor brought to Annapolis departed from the standard masterpieces of the Romantic era ** and gave her listeners a new awareness of music of the 20th century and, in particular, of American composers.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1996
Conductor Ivan Fischer is a frequent visitor to the Baltimore Symphony, and his concert with the orchestra Thursday of music by Mozart, John Harbison and Bartok showed his talents in the best possible light.Harbison's "The Most Often Used Chords," which opened the evening, was an engaging tongue-in-cheek collection of every music theory cliche that has ever haunted students of music. It challenged listeners while seducing them. The scoring was for a Haydn-sized chamber orchestra, plus harp and some exotic mallet percussion, which added enough zip to keep listeners off-balance.
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