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November 20, 1996
Abraham Samuel Blumberg, 75, a sociologist who angered former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover with his criticism of the agency, died Nov. 11 in San Diego after a series of strokes.It was a 1970 classroom discussion led by Mr. Blumberg that incurred Mr. Hoover's wrath.As a professor of social sciences at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, Mr. Blumberg and his students talked about Mr. Hoover's long tenure and the bureau's perceived reluctance to move on civil rights matters.
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By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
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NEWS
By The New York Times | October 17, 1990
LEONARD BERNSTEIN had 72 years of life. They weren't nearly enough for all he wanted to do, all he could have done, all he should have done."Should" because talents like his impose enormous responsibilities.If he didn't wholly fulfill all of them the fault wasn't his. Time got in the way.Some people say that Leonard Bernstein spread himself too thin. But what would they have had him give up? A fine pianist, he turned himself into a remarkable conductor.An extraordinary interpreter of European composers, he became one of the most interesting of American composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The supposedly dying art of classical music keeps getting fresh jolts from all the young talent out there that has yet to buy into that imminent demise notion. One particularly healthy part of the business is chamber music, which seems to get enriched year after year by new ensembles loaded with skill and personality. A case in point is the Aeolus Quartet, formed in 2008 and currently the graduate resident string quartet at Juilliard. A recent residency at the University of Maryland also played a part in honing the group, which was presented Sunday afternoon by the excellent Music in the Great Hall . The players -- violinists Nicholas Tavani and Rachel Shapiro, violist (and Peabody Conservatory alum)
NEWS
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
ROME -- For many filmmakers through the years, a certain kind of pilgrimage to Rome leads to the opulent parlor of the composer Ennio Morricone. It's the place where he has discussed grand concepts and crucial details, and often unveiled new themes on the piano, for the distinctive film scores he has written over the past four decades, from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to The Mission. There are more than 400 of them, though he hasn't kept count. Yesterday, Morricone, 78, was to make his long-overdue American concert debut with 200 musicians and singers at Radio City Music Hall in New York.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 21, 1991
The Schumann Piano Concerto is a hard piece to kill, but pianist Philippe Bianconi, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, came close.In this case of aggravated assault last night in Meyerhoff Hall, the chief culprit was the pianist. When it comes to giving a piece a good battering, Bianconi has all the tools: a bleak and percussive tone (at times when the Schumann sounded like a concerto for xylophone); limited dynamics (mezzo-forte and up); little rhythmic freedom (playing like water torture in its spirit-killing metronomic regularity)
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
Live at the lakefront Keyboard virtuoso Greg Hatza will bring his Greg Hatza ORGANization to the Lake Kittamaqundi Lakefront Thu., July 28, 8 p.m., at the Lake Kittamaqundi lakefront. The Richard Walton Group will perform jazz Sat., July 30, 8 p.m., at the lakefront. Also at Lake Kittamaqundi, Jeni Hankins and Billy Kemp will perform tradition folk and Appalachian music Sun., July 31, 6:30 p.m. Go to http://www.lakefrontfestival.com. Live 'n' local The Columbia Village Centers Courtyard concert series continues with the Kinderman performing a show just for children Thursday, July 28, 6 p.m., at the Dorsey's Search Village Center.
NEWS
By J. KIMBALL C. PAYNE and J. KIMBALL C. PAYNE,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
Proud as a parent, Jill Warzer beamed from the front row yesterday as a band of Baltimore students performed in the first concert many had played in, thanks in large part to a donation of instruments. The fact that the schools have toned down their music curriculum faded into the background as the 65 pupils played selections from Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" and "When the Saints Go Marching In" before about 75 pupils and parents in the auditorium of the Dr. Roland Patterson Academy in North Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2007
MAY May 10 -- Catie Curtis, RHT May 10 -- Groove Stu, Marcell & the Truth, Salim & the Music Lovers, Scott Stone, Sonar May 10 -- In Every Room, the Company, Doug Murphy & the Others, Hidden Attempt, Recher May 10 -- Jonatha Brooke, 8x10 May 10 -- Vusi Mahlasela, RHL May 11 -- Brett Dennen, Alo, Lucas Reynolds, Recher May 11 -- Cake, Pier Six May 11 -- The Clarks, RHT May 11 -- Clutch, 9:30 Club May 11 -- Greyboy Allstars, RHL May 12 -- Adele...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 16, 1998
When he is at his best, the work of Jeffrey Tate compares to that of most of the conductors of his generation as a figure cast in bronze by Michelangelo does to a Dresden figurine.The 54-year-old British conductor was at that level for most of last night's concert -- his first with the Baltimore Symphony -- in Meyerhoff Hall.For listeners who sometimes cannot understand why Goethe thought so highly of Mendelssohn's music, Tate's account of the composer's Symphony No. 3 ("Scottish") may have come as something of a revelation.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
Live at the lakefront Keyboard virtuoso Greg Hatza will bring his Greg Hatza ORGANization to the Lake Kittamaqundi Lakefront Thu., July 28, 8 p.m., at the Lake Kittamaqundi lakefront. The Richard Walton Group will perform jazz Sat., July 30, 8 p.m., at the lakefront. Also at Lake Kittamaqundi, Jeni Hankins and Billy Kemp will perform tradition folk and Appalachian music Sun., July 31, 6:30 p.m. Go to http://www.lakefrontfestival.com. Live 'n' local The Columbia Village Centers Courtyard concert series continues with the Kinderman performing a show just for children Thursday, July 28, 6 p.m., at the Dorsey's Search Village Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 8, 2010
The Baltimore Sun From the sight of emperor penguins in Antarctica, huddled against the cold and darkness, to sweeping shots of herd-filled plains, the TV series "Planet Earth" reached new heights of nature filmmaking. The show, which debuted on the BBC in 2006 and in this country on the Discovery Channel the next year, featured the results from 12,000 hours of film shot on state-of-the-art, high-def equipment over a period of 2,000 days on 204 locations in 62 countries. "Planet Earth" gained impressive ratings around the globe and, in its DVD release, has sold millions of copies.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2008
The Joe Byrd Trio and Quartet farewell concerts at Loews Annapolis Powerhouse last weekend were sold out, filled with fans who witnessed the end of an era of authentic, sophisticated American jazz that has been at home in Annapolis the past 40 years. Joe Byrd has been playing bass for 50 years - 40 years with his world-class guitarist brother Charlie Byrd. After Charlie's death in 1999, Joe maintained his style of jazz with administrative support from Elana, his wife of 31 years. Elana Byrd, a lawyer who also acts as her husband's promoter and agent, serves as concert emcee.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2007
MAY May 10 -- Catie Curtis, RHT May 10 -- Groove Stu, Marcell & the Truth, Salim & the Music Lovers, Scott Stone, Sonar May 10 -- In Every Room, the Company, Doug Murphy & the Others, Hidden Attempt, Recher May 10 -- Jonatha Brooke, 8x10 May 10 -- Vusi Mahlasela, RHL May 11 -- Brett Dennen, Alo, Lucas Reynolds, Recher May 11 -- Cake, Pier Six May 11 -- The Clarks, RHT May 11 -- Clutch, 9:30 Club May 11 -- Greyboy Allstars, RHL May 12 -- Adele...
NEWS
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,New York Times News Service | February 4, 2007
ROME -- For many filmmakers through the years, a certain kind of pilgrimage to Rome leads to the opulent parlor of the composer Ennio Morricone. It's the place where he has discussed grand concepts and crucial details, and often unveiled new themes on the piano, for the distinctive film scores he has written over the past four decades, from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to The Mission. There are more than 400 of them, though he hasn't kept count. Yesterday, Morricone, 78, was to make his long-overdue American concert debut with 200 musicians and singers at Radio City Music Hall in New York.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | February 3, 2007
Poetry and music are forever addressing issues of life and death. When the two art forms are brought together in that pursuit, the results can be doubly, deeply revealing and affecting. Such is the case with Benjamin Britten's Serenade for tenor, horn and strings, an extraordinarily subtle reflection on mortality. The work's exquisite imagery and arresting sounds enveloped Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday afternoon. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's repeat performance this morning should be well worth catching.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Thanksgiving traditionally ushers in the start of the holiday entertainment season with an array of pops concerts, children's shows, plays and Christmas oratorios. Among old and new holiday traditions are three musical versions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Colonial Players' oldest and usually sold-out version has lyrics written by Rick Wade and music by Dick Gessner. It runs Dec. 5 to Dec. 8 and Dec. 12 to Dec. 15. A limited number of seats remain. Tickets are $6. Information: 410-268- 7373.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | October 6, 2006
"It pays not to tour for a while," Barbra Streisand quipped after being hit with the first roar of an eager 16,000 fans packed into the Wachovia Center in Philadelphia Wednesday night, the start of a 16-city North American tour that reaches Washington next week. Never mind that folks paid hundreds, even thousands, of dollars in 2000 to catch what was billed as her final public concert performances. Legends have every right to change their minds.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 9, 2006
Washington -- As befitting an often over-the-top pop diva, Mariah Carey's show Thursday night at the Verizon Center was a sparkly, narcissistic affair. The set was definitely expensive - and impressive. Over the two-tier stage stood a giant, ivory "M" flashing shades of red and blue. There was a grand staircase to the left and a huge neon, block-lettered sign that spelled out the singer's nickname: Mimi. Even Carey's mike stand glittered. And such a spectacle wouldn't be complete without a troupe of limber, gyrating dancers.
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