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NEWS
December 1, 2001
THE OPENING of the Carl G. Murphy Fine Arts Center is a major improvement to Morgan State University's facilities for students and a great addition to Baltimore's arts venues. Tonight's inaugural recital by the soprano Jessye Norman introduces Baltimore to the 2,036-seat, full-staged Gilliam Concert Hall, which should offer the community many outstanding performances in the future. Now East Baltimore has a first-class concert hall that is both a little more intimate and more versatile than midtown's Meyerhoff Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-enclosed Dance Cube jutting from the structure; views of the downtown Baltimore skyline from upper floors. Phase one of the project was finished two years ago; phase two wrapped up in time for this week's start of UMBC's academic year. The $160 million, environmentally conscious edifice brings together under one roof (painted white for maximum reflection and energy savings)
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NEWS
February 16, 1998
SYMPHONIC MUSIC, it turns out, could prove a potent political weapon. It could achieve what mere mortal officeholders have failed to accomplish: a unity of purpose for Maryland's impoverished urban center (Baltimore) and Maryland's most affluent suburban county (Montgomery).What promises to bring the two groups together is a planned $50 million concert hall on the grounds of Strathmore Hall near Rockville, Montgomery's county seat. It would serve as a "second home" for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, giving culturally underserved residents of this Washington suburb a world-class orchestra and musical events year-round.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Thank you for your insightful editorial on August 5th, advocating for a harm reduction approach to drug use at electronic dance music (EDM) events ( "High risk high," Aug. 5). As the mother of a college student who died of a heat stroke last summer after taking "Molly" as part of her experience at one of these events, I have come to understand more than I ever cared to about this issue. But the death of my daughter has made activism an imperative for me, and I want to see similar tragedies come to an end. Before my daughter, Shelley Goldsmith, died, I had never heard of "harm reduction.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 12, 2005
Concerts don't begin with the first played note. The preamble - arrival at the hall, taking a seat, waiting for the music - can contribute substantially to the total experience. For the past few years, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been addressing ways to improve that experience for its audiences. There has been a lot of talk about giving patrons a good time from the moment they find a parking space. At the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the most obvious manifestations of this focus are the proliferating refreshment stands in the lobby.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 2006
The opening of a new concert hall is like a pre-ultrasound-era birth - you never know in advance what you're going to get. In the case of the rooftop Performing Arts Theater at the University of Baltimore's angular, glass-wrapped, $20 million Student Center on Mount Royal Avenue, preliminary indications were positive for a distinctive acoustical space. With only 200 seats and a slender, unfussy, high-ceilinged design, the hall looks like it can deliver a superior sonic experience. After Tuesday night's inaugural concert, I'd say it has fallen a little short, but remains promising.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's second home in North Bethesda has been approved for construction by the Montgomery County Council. By unanimous vote, the nine-member council agreed Wednesday night to share evenly with the state the $89 million cost of building a 2,000-seat concert auditorium at Strathmore Hall, an 11-acre historic estate on Rockville Pike. The state agreed in April to pay its half of the Strathmore Arts Center, which will include the concert hall and a performing arts school.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
IS MUSIC a necessity or a frill? Can Montgomery County taxpayers afford to help fund construction of a "world class" concert hall when schools and libraries need capital funds as well? Should construction be 100 percent publicly funded, or should private contributions be solicited too? Those are a few of the issues that Montgomery County Council members are debating as they decide whether to allocate construction funds for a proposed 2,000-seat concert hall and education center at Strathmore Hall in North Bethesda.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 7, 2001
VIENNA -- If there is such a thing as a sacred concert hall, the Musikverein is surely one of the most hallowed. Home to the Vienna Philharmonic, which continues to set a sublime standard in the orchestral world, the ornate hall itself radiates history, tradition, style. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra honored those qualities in a pair of concerts that appeared to impress the discriminating Viennese public each night. No wonder. The ensemble, still on a high after its rock-solid performances in Paris and, especially, Berlin earlier in the week, once again offered impassioned, cohesive work under Yuri Temirkanov's dynamic direction.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 24, 1991
When Painters Mill Theatre went up in flames early Monday, it burned a big hole in Baltimore's live music scene. Granted, it's always sad to see a concert hall silenced so abruptly, particularly one that was home to so many musical memories. Over the past three decades, the hall was host to an astonishing array of talent, including Derek & the Dominos, Bruce Springsteen, the Police and others. Bob Dylan had played to a sold-out house there just weeks before the fire.But the loss of Painters Mill cuts deeper than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
UPDATE: At the end of January, The American Marketing Association - Baltimore presented the BSO with the Marketing Excellence Award for Best Advertising Campaign for this project. Last year, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra launched a marketing campaign aimed at showing the public just how un-snobby its musicians are. Large banners were unveiled on the exterior of Meyerhoff Hall showing players in playful, super-friendly poses. No formal wear, no look-at-how-serious-and-well-trained-I-am shots.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | December 5, 2013
Composer George Frederick Handel's "Messiah" was first performed in Dublin in 1742, and it has been performed around the world ever since. Maintaining that tradition in Howard County, Columbia Pro Cantare performs its 27th annual "Messiah" on Sunday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. The edited version that Columbia Pro Cantare performs every December includes this famous oratorio's Christmas section and selections from Parts II and III. Running around two hours, this version ensures that audience members will hear their favorite passages.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 11, 2013
The Columbia Orchestra starts its 36th season in a big way by performing Giuseppe Verdi's Requiem on Saturday, Oct. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. This massive composition entails having the 80-member Columbia Orchestra joined by a 100-voice choir from Northern Virginia known as Choralis. Big numbers also add up for Columbia Orchestra Music Director Jason Love, who is in his 15th year in that position. His innovative and ambitious programs during that period have not gone unnoticed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
John Williams has won just about everything there is to win in the music industry, including a slew of Grammys, Golden Globes, Emmys and no less than five Academy Awards - his record of 48 Oscar nominations is second only to Walt Disney. If the 81-year-old composer, whose career encompasses the campy mid-'60s vintage TV series "Lost in Space" and last year's sobering, soaring movie "Lincoln," wanted to rest on his comfy stack of laurels, no one would blame him. But Williams remains as busy as ever with film projects, commissions for concert works and conducting gigs.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 22, 2012
The holiday season calendar tends to fill up pretty quickly, so it's not too soon to start your shopping for classical music concerts in December. One classy upcoming program to keep in mind is the Columbia Orchestra's next concert on Saturday, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. Just as chestnuts are roasting on an open fire at this time of year, the program ignites with beloved musical chestnuts by Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff. However, it also includes the Maryland premiere of a short piece by New York-based composer Nkeiru Okoye.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
It isn't unusual for students to remember the impact a teacher had on them well into adulthood, but on Saturday, many students of former Baltimore music teacher Lucille Marcus Brooks had an unusual opportunity to tell her — more than a half-century after they sat in her classroom. About 150 people, including many former students, packed Union Baptist Church to celebrate 100 years of Brooks' life, three-quarters of which she has devoted to grooming some of the region's finest musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | April 4, 1996
Winner's recitalBarrie Cooper won this year's William Marbury Violin Competition at the Peabody Institute. Part of her prize is her public recital in Friedberg Concert Hall on Tuesday evening.Her interesting program includes Franck's popular A Major Sonata and Saint-Saens "Introduction and Rondo," as well as music by Korngold and Leclain.The concert hall is at 1 E. Mount Vernon Place. The performance is at 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday. Admission is free. Call (410) 659-8124 for more information.Pub Date: 4/04/96
NEWS
April 2, 2006
LINCOLN CENTER JAZZ ORCHESTRA WITH WYNTON MARSALIS / / May 2 / / Concert with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, jazz musician Wynton Marsalis and Odadaa (percussionists and dancers from Ghana) with their leader and drummer Yacub Addy, 8 p.m. at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. N.W., Washington. $40-$85. 800-444-1324 or kennedy-center .org.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
In "Learning to live with the ringing" (Jan. 22), Tim Smith quotes Baltimore Symphony Orchestra director Marin Alsop as saying, "No one does these things [allows cell phones to ring during performances] intentionally. ... We have to try to be kind and humane. " Maestra Alsop is too kind. No one has to bring a cell phone into a concert hall or theater. Leave them home or in the glove compartment. Henry Cohen, Baltimore
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
As a child, Heather Patterson played the piano. She's always loved opera and classical music. But that was a long time ago, before she wound up in prison on drug charges. Yet those memories came back Friday as renowned classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein performed selections of Schubert and Bach for about 46 inmates of the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup. "Listening to you play brought me back to a good time in my life," Patterson, 32 and originally of Hagerstown, told Dinnerstein.
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