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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Since 1987, Concert Artists of Baltimore has enlivened the music scene with a distinctive mix of repertoire, since the organization consists of both a professional chorus and chamber orchestra. Saturday's lineup is typically diverse and intriguing. "I thought I would do a kind of telescope thing, but looking backwards from now to Mozart, the granddaddy of us all," said Edward Polochick, Concert Artists' founding artistic director. To start, there will be a work by one of America's finest contemporary composers, Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for music (in 1983)
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Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Last weekend found two of the area's orchestral ensembles in fine form. Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an imaginative mix of standard and far-from-standard fare Saturday night at the Gordon Center. The familiar work was Mendelssohn's "Scottish Symphony," which received an absorbing performance conducted by Edward Polochick. He paid great attention to subtle details, especially the woodwind voices, and he ensured that the most atmospheric elements in the score came through vividly (slicing string attacks in the finale evoked a brisk highland breeze)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Weekends are wonderfully musical around here, offering, more often than not, too many events for any one listener to take in, without benefit of helicopter or cloning. The choices I made last weekend paid handsome dividends. On Saturday night at the Gordon Center, which boasts some of the most satisfying acoustics around, the Concert Artists of Baltimore, led by Edward Polochick, delivered a typically diverse program in typically dynamic fashion. When it comes to our local professional orchestras, the Baltimore Symphony rightly holds pride of place; it's one of America's finest, after all. To my ears, the next ensemble in any Baltimore-area ranking would have to be Concert Artists, which, more often than not, plays way beyond its pay scale and produces a sound much richer than its size would suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Last weekend saw two more entries in Baltimore's 2013-14 music season, each yielding rewards. Saturday night at the Gordon Center, Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an unusual pairing -- Schubert on the first half, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev on the second. If there was a secret to the combination, artistic director Edward Polochick didn't make it clear in his lengthy, sometimes fuzzy remarks woven throughout the evening (like most of us, he could use an editor). What mattered in the end, though, was all the stylish music-making.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Last year, when Concert Artists of Baltimore planned the March program for its 2012-2013 season, the most interesting part was the repertoire -- an unusual pairing of Beethoven's Mass in C with Saint-Saens' Piano Concerto No. 2. By the time that program arrived over the weekend, there was something a lot newsier about it. The soloist in the concerto, Peabody grad Eric Zuber, was recently chosen to be one of 30 participants in the International Van...
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Last weekend found two of the area's orchestral ensembles in fine form. Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an imaginative mix of standard and far-from-standard fare Saturday night at the Gordon Center. The familiar work was Mendelssohn's "Scottish Symphony," which received an absorbing performance conducted by Edward Polochick. He paid great attention to subtle details, especially the woodwind voices, and he ensured that the most atmospheric elements in the score came through vividly (slicing string attacks in the finale evoked a brisk highland breeze)
FEATURES
By W. Andrew Powell and W. Andrew Powell,Special to The Sun | May 9, 1994
When Edward Polochick called his Saturday program at the College of Notre Dame "a curious mix," he wasn't kidding.But the Concert Artists of Baltimore artistic director also suggested that by evening's end we would grasp the logic of bundling music by Falla, Eduardo Plaza, Rodriguez Socas, Guastavino, Antonio Esteves and Ginastera with the Beethoven Third Piano Concerto.The logic never quite made itself clear.What did emerge were a string of ably prepared, usually polished, sometimes probing performances -- an apt tribute to this group's adventurous spirit as it wound up the first season of a LeClerc Hall residency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
The 2013-2014 opera season at the Modell Performing Arts Center at The Lyric will have a lot in common with the 2012-2013 season -- staged works by Verdi and Puccini produced by Lyric Opera Baltimore, with a concert in between. There is something substantially more adventurous in terms of repertoire for next season, courtesy of the Peabody Opera Theatre, which will present Poulenc's "Dialogues of the Carmelites. " That masterpiece was last performed at the Lyric in 1984 by the old Baltimore Opera Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Weekends are wonderfully musical around here, offering, more often than not, too many events for any one listener to take in, without benefit of helicopter or cloning. The choices I made last weekend paid handsome dividends. On Saturday night at the Gordon Center, which boasts some of the most satisfying acoustics around, the Concert Artists of Baltimore, led by Edward Polochick, delivered a typically diverse program in typically dynamic fashion. When it comes to our local professional orchestras, the Baltimore Symphony rightly holds pride of place; it's one of America's finest, after all. To my ears, the next ensemble in any Baltimore-area ranking would have to be Concert Artists, which, more often than not, plays way beyond its pay scale and produces a sound much richer than its size would suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
In theory, if not always in practice, all opera singing should sound beautiful. It's practically required when dealing with one specific genre, the early 19th century Italian repertoire known as "bel canto," because that's what it means - "beautiful singing. " The style calls for an evenly produced tone, great technical agility to handle florid passages (known as coloratura), and plenty of expressive personality. Great bel canto singing delivers one of the best thrills in opera. On Saturday night, Lyric Opera Baltimore will present a concert featuring excerpts from works by the three giants of the bel canto style, Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini, performed by a group of up-and-coming vocal artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Last year, when Concert Artists of Baltimore planned the March program for its 2012-2013 season, the most interesting part was the repertoire -- an unusual pairing of Beethoven's Mass in C with Saint-Saens' Piano Concerto No. 2. By the time that program arrived over the weekend, there was something a lot newsier about it. The soloist in the concerto, Peabody grad Eric Zuber, was recently chosen to be one of 30 participants in the International Van...
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
With all the usual fresh-look-forward talk prompted by the new year, it's a good time to consider broadening your musical horizons to include performances presented by groups that might have been off your radar. Baltimore is not just fortunate to have a major orchestra, but also several smaller organizations that provide a good deal of musical value. The area is also rich in academic campuses — Peabody Institute, Towson University, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, etc. — where a lot of classical music activity takes place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Dennis James, a heralded armonica virtuoso who lives in upstate New York, will visit Baltimore next weekend to be a soloist with two organizations. The story goes that in 1761, when Benjamin Franklin invented the glass instrument he dubbed the "armonica," he kept it from his wife so he could surprise her by playing it one night after she had gone to bed. "Surprise" was the apt word. She assumed she had died and was hearing the music of the angels. To this day, the sound of the armonica, created by rubbing the rims of water-filled glasses with wet fingers, remains wonderfully ethereal — when you can hear it. There are few masters of this difficult instrument, and opportunities to experience their work don't come around every day. So it's doubly newsworthy that Dennis James, a heralded armonica virtuoso who lives in upstate New York, will visit Baltimore next weekend to be a soloist with two organizations.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 23, 2011
Loraine P. Bernstein, a musical trust's administrator who assisted young musicians in gaining an audience, died of a heart attack Tuesday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 82. Born Loraine Panek in Warehouse Point, Conn., she was the youngest of three children of Polish immigrant farmers who raised vegetables and cigar tobacco in the Connecticut River Valley. "She was a child of the Depression and had lots of stories about the farm she used to her advantage during my childhood," said her son, Richard M. Bernstein of Freeland.
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