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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 18, 1990
If the term "conceptual art" makes you want to run and hide, spend a little time with John Baldessari.Not that his art doesn't have its esoteric side. But it's also meant to be an art that the public can respond to without postgraduate courses. In fact, Baldessari says, sitting in front of one of his pictures at the C. Grimaldis Gallery's current show, he got into conceptual art as a way to communicate."I had originally been a painter, up until the mid-'60s, and I began to stop painting simply because I didn't think I was reaching people.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
The photograph of the Washington-based artist Mary Coble, clad only in a pair of plain white underwear, is, quite literally, blood-draining. Etched into her back and legs and arms with a dry tattoo needle are "Martha", "Patrick", "Jorge" and 435 other names — each one indicating someone with a nontraditional sexual orientation who was murdered as the result of a hate crime. The names cover nearly every inch of Coble's flesh, from her neck to her feet. The artist pressed a rectangle of white paper over each tattoo, and the reverse images, traced in the iron-rich brown of Coble blood, cover a nearby wall.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | November 19, 2000
Too bad Joseph Beuys wasn't there. The sun shone pale and clear, small brown leaves streamed by on the gusts of a northeasterly wind and Patterson Park was dotted with enough holes to make its green-tufted fields resemble Swiss cheese. Here was 13-year-old Jason Williams of Highlandtown's South East Youth Academy, thunking away with a pickax at the red earth. Over there, Dean Mack, coach of the Rink Rats youth ice hockey team, puffed his cheeks with exertion as he shoveled dirt. Front and center?
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 24, 2008
It's rare for a work of conceptual art to touch the emotions as strongly as it engages the intellect. Yet Laura Burns' homage to the "disappeared women" of Ciudad Juarez in Mexico, where an epidemic of rape and murder has claimed the lives of hundreds of female factory workers over the past 15 years, is surely one of the most compelling shows to appear in Baltimore this year. Beautifully installed at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson by exhibitions director Jed Dodds and the artist, Laura Burns: Homenaje is a model of simplicity.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 24, 2008
It's rare for a work of conceptual art to touch the emotions as strongly as it engages the intellect. Yet Laura Burns' homage to the "disappeared women" of Ciudad Juarez in Mexico, where an epidemic of rape and murder has claimed the lives of hundreds of female factory workers over the past 15 years, is surely one of the most compelling shows to appear in Baltimore this year. Beautifully installed at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson by exhibitions director Jed Dodds and the artist, Laura Burns: Homenaje is a model of simplicity.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 28, 1999
In 1970, during the height of the Vietnam War, a precocious schoolgirl with waist-length tresses and the face of a Raphael Madonna submitted a single, neatly typewritten page of text as her contribution to a group show of young artists at New York's Museum of Modern Art."The work originally intended for this space has been withdrawn," the document read. "I submit its absence as evidence of the inability of art expression to have meaningful existence under conditions other than those of peace, equality, truth, trust and freedom."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 8, 2003
A conceptual art scholar with a flair for communication has been hired to oversee the contemporary art collections at the Baltimore Museum of Art and to develop exhibitions attractive to broad audiences, museum administrators announced yesterday. Chris Gilbert, an associate curator at Iowa's Des Moines Art Center who has organized shows on topics from Scottish painter Chad McCail to an exploration of identity in sports and spectacle, will step into the post in August. He replaces Helen Molesworth, who resigned last November to become chief curator for exhibitions at the Wexner Center in Ohio.
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By GLENN MCNATT | December 10, 2000
The critic Robert Hughes has commented that, unlike our grandparents, we live in a world that we ourselves have made. "Until about 50 years ago, images of nature were the keys to feelings in art," Hughes wrote in his 1981 book, "The Shock of the New." "If this sense has now become dimmed," Hughes observed, "it is partly because for most people nature has been replaced by the culture of congestion: of cities and mass media. ... In the last 30 years, capitalism plus electronics have given us a new habitat, our forest of media."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 17, 2001
Moira Dryer, the Canadian-born New York painter who died of breast cancer in 1992 at the age of 34, conceived of her pictures as theatrical props or characters in a personal drama grounded in her own life. Her work is the subject of an oddly moving retrospective exhibit at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum through Aug. 26. I say oddly moving because at first, Dryer's pictures appear to have nothing to do with storytelling of any kind. Many paintings consist simply of vertical bands of color arranged across the width of the picture like prison bars.
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By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
NEW YORK -- To get a handle on the extraordinary story of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, let's begin with a list.It appeared in the January 1994 issue of a respected magazine called ARTnews and is, to be precise, a list of the world's 200 top art collectors. Not surprisingly, the list contains names like Rothschild, Getty, Mellon, Rockefeller and Baltimore's own Robert and Jane Meyerhoff; names associated with fortunes made in banking and industry and, quite often, inherited wealth.But the "ARTnews 200" list also includes two names that rank among the world's most unlikely candidates: Herbert and Dorothy Vogel.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 8, 2003
A conceptual art scholar with a flair for communication has been hired to oversee the contemporary art collections at the Baltimore Museum of Art and to develop exhibitions attractive to broad audiences, museum administrators announced yesterday. Chris Gilbert, an associate curator at Iowa's Des Moines Art Center who has organized shows on topics from Scottish painter Chad McCail to an exploration of identity in sports and spectacle, will step into the post in August. He replaces Helen Molesworth, who resigned last November to become chief curator for exhibitions at the Wexner Center in Ohio.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 17, 2002
NEW YORK -- In one gallery a computer-based work includes a photograph of inmates at a Nazi concentration camp into which an artist has inserted a picture of himself holding a Diet Coke. Nearby, a piece called Giftgas Giftset features colorful canisters of make-believe poison gas labeled "Chanel," "Hermes" and "Tiffany." In another room are clay busts of Josef Mengele, the infamous Nazi doctor who conducted gruesome experiments on inmates at the Auschwitz concentration camp. For months, the art world has debated the worth of these works, whether they are art, hurtful provocations or tasteless trivia.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 17, 2001
Moira Dryer, the Canadian-born New York painter who died of breast cancer in 1992 at the age of 34, conceived of her pictures as theatrical props or characters in a personal drama grounded in her own life. Her work is the subject of an oddly moving retrospective exhibit at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum through Aug. 26. I say oddly moving because at first, Dryer's pictures appear to have nothing to do with storytelling of any kind. Many paintings consist simply of vertical bands of color arranged across the width of the picture like prison bars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT | December 10, 2000
The critic Robert Hughes has commented that, unlike our grandparents, we live in a world that we ourselves have made. "Until about 50 years ago, images of nature were the keys to feelings in art," Hughes wrote in his 1981 book, "The Shock of the New." "If this sense has now become dimmed," Hughes observed, "it is partly because for most people nature has been replaced by the culture of congestion: of cities and mass media. ... In the last 30 years, capitalism plus electronics have given us a new habitat, our forest of media."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | November 19, 2000
Too bad Joseph Beuys wasn't there. The sun shone pale and clear, small brown leaves streamed by on the gusts of a northeasterly wind and Patterson Park was dotted with enough holes to make its green-tufted fields resemble Swiss cheese. Here was 13-year-old Jason Williams of Highlandtown's South East Youth Academy, thunking away with a pickax at the red earth. Over there, Dean Mack, coach of the Rink Rats youth ice hockey team, puffed his cheeks with exertion as he shoveled dirt. Front and center?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 28, 1999
In 1970, during the height of the Vietnam War, a precocious schoolgirl with waist-length tresses and the face of a Raphael Madonna submitted a single, neatly typewritten page of text as her contribution to a group show of young artists at New York's Museum of Modern Art."The work originally intended for this space has been withdrawn," the document read. "I submit its absence as evidence of the inability of art expression to have meaningful existence under conditions other than those of peace, equality, truth, trust and freedom."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 17, 2002
NEW YORK -- In one gallery a computer-based work includes a photograph of inmates at a Nazi concentration camp into which an artist has inserted a picture of himself holding a Diet Coke. Nearby, a piece called Giftgas Giftset features colorful canisters of make-believe poison gas labeled "Chanel," "Hermes" and "Tiffany." In another room are clay busts of Josef Mengele, the infamous Nazi doctor who conducted gruesome experiments on inmates at the Auschwitz concentration camp. For months, the art world has debated the worth of these works, whether they are art, hurtful provocations or tasteless trivia.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 12, 1995
Sol LeWitt is a conceptual artist whose concepts sound as dry as dust. But he produces art that has been described in anything but dry terms.His titles alone won't provoke a stampede to the show of his drawings opening today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Sample: "Bands of Color in Four Directions (Horizontal)," "The Location of Several Lines" and "A Square Divided Horizontally and Vertically Into Four Equal Parts, Each With Lines in Four Directions, Superimposed Progressively."But here's what New York art historian Robert Rosenblum wrote about LeWitt's work on the occasion of a major 1978 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art: "His art has turned out to be stunningly beautiful.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 12, 1995
Sol LeWitt is a conceptual artist whose concepts sound as dry as dust. But he produces art that has been described in anything but dry terms.His titles alone won't provoke a stampede to the show of his drawings opening today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Sample: "Bands of Color in Four Directions (Horizontal)," "The Location of Several Lines" and "A Square Divided Horizontally and Vertically Into Four Equal Parts, Each With Lines in Four Directions, Superimposed Progressively."But here's what New York art historian Robert Rosenblum wrote about LeWitt's work on the occasion of a major 1978 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art: "His art has turned out to be stunningly beautiful.
NEWS
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
NEW YORK -- To get a handle on the extraordinary story of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, let's begin with a list.It appeared in the January 1994 issue of a respected magazine called ARTnews and is, to be precise, a list of the world's 200 top art collectors. Not surprisingly, the list contains names like Rothschild, Getty, Mellon, Rockefeller and Baltimore's own Robert and Jane Meyerhoff; names associated with fortunes made in banking and industry and, quite often, inherited wealth.But the "ARTnews 200" list also includes two names that rank among the world's most unlikely candidates: Herbert and Dorothy Vogel.
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