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NEWS
By Tom Vilsack | December 12, 2011
Whether it was on my "rural tour" of states throughout the country or at workshops with the Department of Justice to discuss competition in agriculture, time and again, livestock and poultry producers have emphasized the need for a fair and competitive industry and workable, common-sense rules to address bad actors. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently finalized a rule to implement the 2008 Farm Bill to help remedy some of these concerns. In the last 30 years, the livestock and poultry marketplace has not only become more concentrated but also more vertically integrated.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
There are times when coach Mark Turgeon is a portrait of anguish on the Maryland sideline. He'll stamp his feet. He'll crouch in front of the bench and lower his head between his legs. He'll gaze up at the rafters, as if searching for inspiration. Fans might imagine that Turgeon's suffering is directly tied to losing games, but it's more complicated than that. Strange as may seem, Turgeon — the ultra-competitive former Kansas point guard who once said, "I'd fight anybody that got in my way" — says winning should not be dominating his thoughts, nor those of his young, depth-challenged team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Georges I. Selzer, who cheated death twice while a concentration camp prisoner and who after World War II became a Baltimore jeweler, died Oct. 17 of heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Lutherville resident was 99. Mr. Selzer, who was born, raised and educated in St. Gallen, Switzerland, settled in France in 1927, when he became an apprentice jeweler. When the Nazis seized power, Mr. Selzer's father told him he was not to disguise his Jewishness.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley | July 27, 2011
As the four recently released Ravens walk out of team headquarters for perhaps the final time this week, they open the door for the team's free-agent priority. The Ravens struck a deal with Marshal Yanda late Tuesday afternoon, agreeing to terms with the coveted offensive lineman on a multi-year deal that is believed to average a little more than $6 million per season. According to SI.com, Yanda agreed to five-year, $32 million deal that includes $10 million signing bonus. He will receive $21 million in first three seasons.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Bracing for the loss of a steady paycheck is becoming something of a routine for Frank Silberstein. A statistician for the U.S. Census Bureau and a union steward for the American Federation of Government Employees, Silberstein said the pitched battle in Washington over whether to raise the nation's $14.3 trillion debt ceiling has — for the second time this year — put federal workers in Maryland on edge about whether they'll still have a...
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
The Maryland Department of the Environment has issued a Code Orange air quality alert Tuesday for the Baltimore metropolitan area. A Code Orange alert means that air pollution concentrations within the region may become unhealthy for certain groups, including children, people suffering from asthma and lung diseases, and the elderly. In Howard County, health officer Peter Beilenson issued an Extreme Heat Alert for Tuesday, noting that high temperatures and humidity levels will make the heat outside feel 100 degrees or hotter.
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
Lauren Frenz , of Mount Airy, traveled to Honduras as part of a service learning program at Malone University, in Anton, Ohio. She is a senior majoring innursing. Afton Vechery , of Woodbine, earned a Bachelor of Science in business enterprise management, with a dual concentration in new science development and new business development, and a double minor in neuroscience and entrepreneurship and social enterprise, from Wake Forest University, in Winston-Salem, N.C. She also received the Spirit of Wayne Calloway Award, the Hobbs Award for Entrepreneurial Achievement and was named to the dean's list for the spring 2010 semester.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Six years ago, at Catholic University in Washington, there was an unusual presentation of Giuseppe Verdi's monumental Requiem for soloists, chorus and orchestra. The last notes of the score gave way to very different music, coming softly from the choristers. As they filed off the stage and left the hall, they softly intoned a chant from the Kaddish of the Jewish liturgy. When those sounds, too, faded away, there was no applause from the audience. Only some muffled sobs could be heard in the darkened room.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
Anthony Steven "Tony" Zyna, a retired National Brewing Co. mechanic and member of the merchant marine who was sent to a Soviet concentration camp during World War II, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease June 18 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 88 and lived in Cockeysville. Born Anthony Zinowski in New Britain, Conn., and raised in New Haven, he left his home at 14 and later joined the Navy. A medical disability — a punctured eardrum — forced him to leave the service and he then joined the merchant marine during World War II. He served aboard the Liberty Ship Barbara Frietchie, as well as the Glenpool and the Paoli.
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