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NEWS
April 24, 1998
Harry Daniller, whose Latvian family was separated in German concentration camps during World War II, will speak tonight at Beth Shalom synagogue's annual service of remembrance for victims of the Holocaust.Before the 8 p.m. service, the congregation will plant trees on the synagogue grounds at 2020 Liberty Road in Taylorsville in memory of the 6 million Jewish victims.Born in Latvia, Daniller was the only child of a concert pianist and his wife. When the war came, his family was split up and he was sent to a camp with his mother.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Milton Bromberg, a custom tailor and decorated World War II veteran who visited the White House to fit President Bill Clinton for suits, died of respiratory failure Nov. 1 at Season's Hospice at Northwest Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Owings Mills. Born in Providence, R.I., he was the son of Benjamin Bromberg, who delivered coal on a horse-drawn cart. His mother, Lena Bromberg, a homemaker, taught him to sew as a boy. While a senior in high school, Mr. Bromberg was drafted into the Army and served in a combat infantry unit in Europe.
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NEWS
January 16, 2000
Working in trouble spots from Afghanistan to Zambia, Doctors Without Frontiers has established an unassailable record for selfless medical service as well as accuracy of its information. When that Nobel Peace Prize-winning humanitarian organization now accuses Russia of war crimes in Chechnya, its charge has to be taken seriously. For several weeks, evidence has been mounting that Russian troops are out of control. Soldiers resorted to large-scale looting. In one videotaped case, a general stood by as soldiers piled stereo systems, televisions and video recorders on a truck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
The most famous, roof-rattling passage in Giuseppe Verdi's "Requiem" describes the "day of wrath" for the guilty as they face their eternal fate: "How great will be the terror when the Judge comes who will smash everything completely … Whatever is hidden will be revealed. Nothing shall remain unavenged. " To hear, let alone sing, those words in ordinary concert halls can be a pretty shattering experience. It is difficult to grasp what it must have been like for the Jewish prisoners at the Terezin concentration camp who performed the Verdi work 16 times in 1943-1944, having learned the music by heart - there was only one score for 150 singers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
Eugene Kamer, retired owner of a playground equipment installation company and a survivor of German concentration camps, died Saturday of encephalopathy, a brain disease, at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. The former Reisterstown resident was 76. Mr. Kamer was born in Krakow, Poland, and as an 11-year-old was imprisoned by the Nazis. He was liberated in 1945 from the Mauthausen concentration camp by troops of the Army's 11th Armored Division. "His mother disappeared and he never saw her again.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2008
Felix Kestenberg, who survived eight concentration camps and two death marches during World War II, died Tuesday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Mr. Kestenberg, the son of a shoe manufacturer, was born and raised in Radom, Poland. During the years of the Nazi horror that engulfed Europe, Mr. Kestenberg lost three elder siblings and his father. Beginning in 1939, when the Germans occupied Poland, and a few months before his 19th birthday, he was taken from his home and sent to a labor camp, where he worked on the fortification of the border with Russia.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 3, 2006
Georges Selzer easily made his way through a crush of students eagerly departing John Carroll School in Bel Air for the day. Using a walker, he traveled quickly through the hallways, until he stood at a podium before a classroom of listeners. He held a stack of note cards. "I call them cheating cards," he said. "I'm 95, remember." A Holocaust survivor, Selzer had come to tell the students how many times he had cheated death. Since this was at least his 15th visit to the private Catholic school, many had heard his story.
TOPIC
By Michael D. Hausfeld | April 1, 2001
IBM IS A company that prides itself on solutions. Recently disclosed materials, however, reveal a chilling portrait of the company's complicity in the evil of the Nazis' search for the "Final Solution." Soon after the Nazis came to power in 1933, they established the first concentration camp, the Dachau camp near Munich, Germany. From 1933 to 1944, IBM Hollerith machines were installed at the main concentration camps of Mauthausen, Ravensbrock, Flossenberg and Buchenwald, and were probably present at Auschwitz.
NEWS
December 14, 1998
William D. Denson, 85, who was chief prosecutor for the United States in Nazi war crimes trials in Dachau, Germany, died in his sleep yesterday at home in Lawrence, N.Y. He was chief prosecutor for atrocities committed in four concentration camps -- Dachau, Mauthausen, Flossenberg and Buchenwald.Pub Date: 12/14/98
NEWS
August 10, 1992
First the United Nations needs to get the people of Bosnia-Herzegovina fed and the concentration camps inspected by the International Red Cross and then emptied, or at the very least maintained with decent standards of nutrition and sanitation and without brutality.If it takes military action to suppress anti-aircraft and artillery fire to get the emergency airlift planes to Sarajevo with food and medicine, then let there be military action. The United States is calling for an emergency meeting of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, and maybe that can lead to some good.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Georges I. Selzer, who cheated death twice while a concentration camp prisoner and who after World War II became a Baltimore jeweler, died Oct. 17 of heart failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Lutherville resident was 99. Mr. Selzer, who was born, raised and educated in St. Gallen, Switzerland, settled in France in 1927, when he became an apprentice jeweler. When the Nazis seized power, Mr. Selzer's father told him he was not to disguise his Jewishness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Six years ago, at Catholic University in Washington, there was an unusual presentation of Giuseppe Verdi's monumental Requiem for soloists, chorus and orchestra. The last notes of the score gave way to very different music, coming softly from the choristers. As they filed off the stage and left the hall, they softly intoned a chant from the Kaddish of the Jewish liturgy. When those sounds, too, faded away, there was no applause from the audience. Only some muffled sobs could be heard in the darkened room.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
Anthony Steven "Tony" Zyna, a retired National Brewing Co. mechanic and member of the merchant marine who was sent to a Soviet concentration camp during World War II, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease June 18 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 88 and lived in Cockeysville. Born Anthony Zinowski in New Britain, Conn., and raised in New Haven, he left his home at 14 and later joined the Navy. A medical disability — a punctured eardrum — forced him to leave the service and he then joined the merchant marine during World War II. He served aboard the Liberty Ship Barbara Frietchie, as well as the Glenpool and the Paoli.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
Food was scarce at the Nazi concentration camp, but the work was relentless. Morris Kornberg toiled day after day in a 1,500-foot-deep, pitch-black coal mine. His weight plummeted to 60 pounds, almost half what it is today. The starvation diet and hard labor stripped him of not just his girth, but also of his will to live. "When I was in Auschwitz, I gave up," he said. "I didn't want to live anymore. Whatever they were going to do to me, I just wanted it over." And yet today, even as he recalls watching hundreds of his fellow prisoners kill themselves by running into the electric fence around the camp, he can't explain why he didn't do the same.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a Holocaust fable, is meant to be a heartbreaker about the moral lessons to be gleaned from the friendship of two 8-year-olds, a Jewish concentration-camp inmate named Shmuel (Jack Scanlon) and the Nazi commandant's son, Bruno (Asa Butterfield). It plays like a cautionary tale about the perils of naivete. Although John Boyne's book has become a middle-school favorite (and the plot does work better in print), I found the movie impossibly basic and sanitized as a "never again" parable of the Final Solution - and simply wrongheaded as a story about children.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2008
Felix Kestenberg, who survived eight concentration camps and two death marches during World War II, died Tuesday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Mr. Kestenberg, the son of a shoe manufacturer, was born and raised in Radom, Poland. During the years of the Nazi horror that engulfed Europe, Mr. Kestenberg lost three elder siblings and his father. Beginning in 1939, when the Germans occupied Poland, and a few months before his 19th birthday, he was taken from his home and sent to a labor camp, where he worked on the fortification of the border with Russia.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Johanna van Schagen, who helped Jews escape from the Nazis during the Holocaust and later was honored by Israel, died Tuesday near Dayton, Ohio, her family said. She was 91. Mrs. van Schagen, who had suffered a series of strokes, died in Trotwood, Ohio, where she lived. She and her husband, Cornelius, moved to the Dayton area in 1956. She told the Dayton Daily News in 1994 that she and her husband sheltered Jews out of anger toward Germans who were taking over their native Netherlands.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | April 15, 1991
The unknown heroes of conscience who helped many European Jews stay a step ahead of the Nazi death machine were recalled in an observance of Yom Hashoah, the annual international remembrance of Holocaust victims.These "righteous Gentiles" or "Christian rescuers" numbered anywhere from 50,000 to 500,000. Whatever their number, they were too few, particularly counted against the 6 million people exterminated in Hitler's concentration camps during World War II.Yet, they did what they could, providing shelter, false papers, food and clothes to help keep Jews and other innocents from the Nazi concentration camps.
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