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NEWS
By Douglas Birch | October 10, 1991
A NASA scientist said yesterday that the concentration of ozone in the upper atmosphere over the South Pole may have fallen to its lowest level since measurements began 13 years ago.Arlin Krueger, an atmospheric scientist with the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, said satellite data gathered Sunday suggests that "we've got a deeper ozone hole than we've ever seen before."The data must still be reviewed and verified, he added.Last week, scientists said the hole failed to shrink, as expected, this year.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector | June 10, 2014
Larry Harris and Leonard Martin grew up around the block from each other but never knew it at the time, caught up as they were in regular childhood concerns and in keeping their heads down in the men-are-macho environment of West Baltimore. By the time they met as adults - Harris a few years out of the Army, Martin jumping through jobs and still looking for his spot in the world - they were surprised at how much they had in common. "It's kind of crazy we lived down the street …" Harris said.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995
SUN REPORTER Jim Haner's Nov. 26 article about changes brought to some Patterson Park area streets by a sudden stream of Section 8 tenants underscores the fragility of many Baltimore inner-city neighborhoods.This should not come as news to anyone, certainly not to City Hall or housing officials. After all, the demolition in the 1960s of 971 houses to accommodate a one-mile stretch of I-170 in the Franklin Street corridor led to a heavy -- and unplanned -- concentration of uprooted families along lower Reisterstown Road and Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 29, 2014
The newest of the magnet programs for advanced high school students in Harford County saw its first class of graduates earn their diplomas this spring. At North Harford High School, the 35 students enrolled in the Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences program were the first to complete four years of the academic concentration. The magnet programs, since the first one was organized in conjunction with a reconstruction project at Aberdeen High School more than a decade ago, have been much touted by successive administrations of Harford County Public Schools.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - Opponents of greater media concentration expressed outrage yesterday over a congressional maneuver that could allow more consolidation in the television industry. The move late Monday was a "total violation" of protocol, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, a South Carolina Democrat, said in a statement. White House officials and Republican congressional leaders "went into a closet, met with themselves, and announced a `compromise"' on how many TV stations one company could own, he said.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
Parents know the drill. It's 2: 15 a.m. and your 2-year-old daughter is way, way up. She's got the cough, she's got the fever, she's got all night to be sick.Dazed, you scurry into the medicine cabinet to hunt for Children's Tylenol chewable tablets/elixir/or liquid -- or Children's Tylenol Cold Multi-Symptom liquid formula -- or Children's Tylenol Cold Plus Cough Multi-Symptom Chewable tablets.Or Infants' Tylenol acetaminophen drops -- or Infants' Tylenol Cold Decongestant Fever-Reducer drops.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 29, 2014
The newest of the magnet programs for advanced high school students in Harford County saw its first class of graduates earn their diplomas this spring. At North Harford High School, the 35 students enrolled in the Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences program were the first to complete four years of the academic concentration. The magnet programs, since the first one was organized in conjunction with a reconstruction project at Aberdeen High School more than a decade ago, have been much touted by successive administrations of Harford County Public Schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 2, 1995
Ari Roth's "Born Guilty" -- based on the book of the same title about journalist Peter Sichrovsky's experiences interviewing the children of Nazis -- opens tomorrow at the Spotlighters, under the direction of Mark Squirek. Deli Strummer, a survivor of five concentration camps, will speak after the opening-night performance.Show times at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Nov. 26. Tickets are $8 and $9. For information, call (410)
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | July 20, 1997
On the field: After two straight nights of ineffective work from the bullpen, Orioles relievers held the Sox scoreless over the last 3 2/3 innings. In the dugout: Manager Davey Johnson removed starter Scott Kamieniecki with the score tied at 3, a runner on first and one out in the sixth inning. Left-hander Arthur Rhodes, who had allowed two runs in each of his past two outings, was brought in for the fourth time in a week and struck out the next two hitters.In the clubhouse: "I'm sure they're being a little too aggressive [at the plate]
SPORTS
By Gary Binford and Gary Binford,New York Daily News | September 13, 1990
SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- Lou Holtz has been spending more time than usual in his golf cart. And it has nothing to do with improving his golf game.The Notre Dame football coach has been genuinely affected by a first-person account of a former Irish player that ran recently in Sports Illustrated, alleging widespread steroid use among the team's players."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
While Centennial Conference teams Dickinson, Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg battled for their playoff lives last weekend, Washington College had the weekend off after wrapping up a 13-1 overall record and an 8-0 league mark in the regular season with an 11-6 victory over Swarthmore on Wednesday. It was a welcomed break for the No. 6 Shoremen, coach Jeff Shirk said. “I do like the fact that we were able to give our guys a couple days off, having that bye,” he said on Monday.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As expected, Johns Hopkins' 12-10 loss to Syracuse on Saturday sparked some soul-searching on the part of the Blue Jays. It's a natural consequence when a team drops its first game after opening the season with five consecutive wins. But coach Dave Pietramala said he hopes that the setback hasn't fundamentally impacted the players. “The key is you treat your wins and losses the same and you learn from them,” he said on Thursday morning. “That's a hard thing to do emotionally and mentally.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
A tool that contains a small amount of radioactive material, used to measure concentrations of lead in paint, was stolen in Baltimore Monday afternoon, the Maryland Department of the Environment said in an alert. The department said the tool, a Dynasil RMD LPA-1 analyzer, stolen after a property inspection in the 2600 block of E. Monument St., poses "no imminent public health risk. " The radioactive material inside the three-pound device is sealed and housed in a tungsten shield, with locks to prevent its shutter from being opened, the department said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Some of the Ravens either didn't know or didn't care about all that needed to happen - at least not at that moment - for them to make the playoffs. A 34-point loss to one of your biggest rivals has a way of making everything else seem insignificant. Other players asked team officials or reporters about the various scenarios before concluding that the only thing that really mattered was beating the Cincinnati Bengals on Sunday. By the time the Ravens reported to the team facility Monday morning for meetings and film review, their path to the playoffs had been dissected and discussed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Milton Bromberg, a custom tailor and decorated World War II veteran who visited the White House to fit President Bill Clinton for suits, died of respiratory failure Nov. 1 at Season's Hospice at Northwest Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Owings Mills. Born in Providence, R.I., he was the son of Benjamin Bromberg, who delivered coal on a horse-drawn cart. His mother, Lena Bromberg, a homemaker, taught him to sew as a boy. While a senior in high school, Mr. Bromberg was drafted into the Army and served in a combat infantry unit in Europe.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Nearly one in four jobs in the Baltimore area requires skills in science, technology, engineering and math, a concentration that ranks among the top 10 in the country and brings wealth to the region, according a report released Monday. The Baltimore area ranks No. 8 on a list of metropolitan areas with the highest percentage of jobs requiring high-level knowledge in STEM, the acronym by which the fields are known. The nearly 282,000 STEM jobs in the region in 2011 made up 23.1 percent of all jobs, according to the Brookings Institution report, "The Hidden Stem Economy.
SPORTS
August 12, 1998
Quote: "Guys think they're not going to get a save, so they just don't prepare themselves properly. That's just a lack of concentration." -- Manager Jim Leyland, whose Marlins nearly blew an 8-0 lead because of the wildness of Matt Mantei and Antonio Alfonseca.It's a fact: The Astros have won seven of 45 games in which they trailed after eight innings.Who's hot: The Giants' Barry Bonds has 24 RBIs in his past 12 games.Who's not: Diamondbacks rookie Travis Lee is 0-for-12 since coming off the disabled list.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991
The joint statement on revised accounting rules and related matters for financial institutions was issued last week by the Comptroller of the Currency, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., Federal Reserve Board and the Office of Thrift Supervision. It contained several pointed messages to bankers and their regulators. Here are a few:*"It is possible, however, that some depository institutions may have become overly cautious in their lending practices. In some instances this caution has been attributed to concerns on the part of lenders that the regulators of depository institutions are applying excessively rigorous examination standards."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
In the aftermath of No. 13 Johns Hopkins' devastating 8-4 loss to then-No. 7 Loyola last Saturday, senior defenseman Tucker Durkin said the week of practice leading up to Friday night's contest at Army would be the most important one of the season. Coach Dave Pietramala said he has been pleased with the players' effort and attention to detail Monday and Tuesday. But one thing the Blue Jays are not paying attention to is their tournament profile. “We don't really talk about it because we can't control that,” Pietramala said Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 24, 2013
Four years into a so-called recovery, and we're still below recession levels in every important respect except the stock market. A measly 88,000 jobs were created in March, and total employment remains some 3 million below its pre-recession level. Labor-force participation is at its lowest level since 1979. The recovery isn't just losing steam. It never had much steam to begin with. That's because so much of our debate over economic policy has been beside the point. On one side have been Keynesians -- followers of the great British economist John Maynard Keynes -- who want more government spending and lower interest rates in order to fuel demand.
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