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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | August 1, 2011
City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway abruptly dropped a $21 million lawsuit against Examiner columnist Adam Meister Monday, conceding that she had, as he'd reported, claimed a Baltimore County house as her primary residence. “I want to thank Belinda for suing me,” Meister told reporters after a brief court hearing,  stripping off a white dress shirt just outside the courtroom to reveal a red-white-and-blue campaign T-shirt for Nick Mosby, who is challenging Conaway in the 7th district.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2011
City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway abruptly dropped a $21 million lawsuit Monday against Examiner columnist Adam Meister, conceding that she had, as he'd reported, claimed a Baltimore County house as her primary residence. "I want to thank Belinda for suing me," Meister told reporters after a brief court hearing, stripping off a white dress shirt to reveal a red-white-and-blue campaign T-shirt for Nick Mosby, who is challenging Conaway in the 7th District. "If it were not for your frivolous lawsuit, you would have zero primary opponents, and nobody would have known about your house in Randallstown," Meister said.
NEWS
June 21, 2011
Tricia Bishop penned an article in The Sun concerning that legislative audit of the Clerk's Office at the Circuit Court for Baltimore City that reveals a near complete lack of understanding of the business processes in the clerk's office and the auditor's report ("Audit: Millions uncollected by clerk's office," June 15). Or, perhaps the purpose of the article was to intentionally deceive the readers? By way of example, Ms. Bishop highlights the case of Thomas Perrin and reports that "a clerical error in 2000 nearly cost Thomas Perrin years of freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 21, 2011
If City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway really thinks she's going to get $21 million out of Examiner columnist Adam Meister, she'd better hurry. Looks like he's about to spend a fortune. An invite he's posted on Facebook reads: "Adam Meister's $21 million 4th of July Party. " Conaway is suing Meister and Examiner newspapers over an online column he wrote claiming that she lives in Baltimore County instead of the city she represents. He linked to public records indicating that Conaway not only owns a house in the county, but claims it as her primary residence for tax purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 16, 2011
At the mayoral candidates forum last night at Coppin State, political hopefuls discussed serious topics, such as taxes and the economy.  But early in the night, one candidate made a series of seemingly bizarre statements. Baltimore City Circuit Court clerk Frank Conaway, the perennial mayoral candidate, apparently endorsed cronyism, race-baiting and Jim Crow laws all within the span of a few minutes.  Read City Hall reporter Julie Scharper's article in The Sun here .  "You can be black on the outside and white on the inside," [Conaway]
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
Baltimore mayoral candidates vowed to cut property taxes, expand job programs for teenagers and invest more money in neighborhoods at a forum sponsored by two civil rights groups Wednesday night. Former city planning director Otis Rolley drew applause when he vowed to build new schools and recreation centers and when he criticized Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's spending cuts to youth programs. "If you can raise $800,000 in one night for your campaign, you should be able to raise more money for summer jobs," said Rolley.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
Maryland's Office of Legislative Audits has uncovered some doozies of fraud, waste and abuse in its day, but that's not what its recent report on the Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk's Office found. Rather, it described an office with record keeping procedures so sloppy that it's impossible to know for sure whether everything is being done correctly; in some instances, auditors reported that funds could be misappropriated without detection. The auditors documented millions in uncollected or unaccounted-for fees and found no clear delineation of responsibility between the clerk and the sheriff on who was responsible for some parts of the process.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
The Baltimore City Council called on officials of the Housing Authority and other agencies to explain what's being done about paying judgments of nearly $12 million to public housing residents poisoned by lead paint. The council also agreed Monday to hold hearings on a proposal to seek corporate sponsorship for city buildings and programs, such as community recreation centers and pools, and on preserving the site of the old Read's drugstore at Lexington and Howard streets, where a lunch counter sit-in protesting racial discrimination was held in 1955.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has coped with a pair of historic blizzards, closed a record budget deficit and overhauled the police and fire pension system since taking office in February. Now, at 40, she is gearing up for her biggest challenge yet: keeping the position she filled when Sheila Dixon resigned earlier this year. With fewer than 10 months to go until Baltimore's primary election, several candidates have already said they will run against Rawlings-Blake, who was elected City Council president by a tidy margin in 2007 and automatically elevated when Dixon's legal problems created a vacancy.
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