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NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Frank M. Conaway Sr., one of the oldest hands in Baltimore politics, announced officially yesterday that he will run for mayor, harshly criticizing the policies of Mayor Sheila Dixon and outlining his plan to remedy what he called Baltimore's crime-rate "crisis." At his announcement at War Memorial Plaza, the three-term clerk of Baltimore's Circuit Court argued that Dixon has lost control of the city, which he described as a lawless war zone. Bowing out Comptroller Joan M. Pratt decides not to run for mayor.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | August 6, 1991
The leading black ministerial groups in Baltimore have endorsed the re-election of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, as well as the candidacy of Register of Wills Mary Conaway for city comptroller.The Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance and the Baptist Ministers Conference of Baltimore and Vicinity also supported candidates in five of the six City Council districts, according to the Rev. Collin C. Alexander, president of the Baptist Ministers Conference.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 16, 1992
A former Maryland legislator says a national chain of photo studios fired him after he caught the company using a secret racial code to alert employees when they were scheduled to work at black churches.Frank M. Conaway Sr., a former West Baltimore delegate, said Olan Mills, a chain of portrait studios based in Chattanooga, Tenn., fired him and his son, Frank M. Conaway Jr., as salesmen last month in retaliation for blowing the whistle on the racial code.He said the company's racial codes allowed it to steer the Conaways to black churches and away from more lucrative white parish accounts.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,sun reporter | November 22, 2006
With no money and no desire to raise any, Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr. formally announced yesterday that he will run for mayor in the 2007 election. Conaway has been a frequent critic of Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley's City Hall administration, and his announcement yesterday showed that his campaign will continue the same theme. "Baltimore is in crisis," Conaway, 73, wrote in a statement. "It is time for honest, candid and mature leadership. For too many years, we have neglected our schools.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Baltimore Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway said yesterday that he will challenge Mayor Martin O'Malley in the next Democratic primary, making Conaway the first opponent of the mayor's to announce his candidacy. Conaway, 69, a former state delegate who finished third in the 1999 Democratic primary for City Council president, said he is running because O'Malley has not made the city safe enough and because he does not hire enough local African-Americans. "`Believe?' Believe in what?
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
Baltimore Register of Wills Mary W. Conaway has no problem distinguishing herself from the seven other mayoral candidates hoping to win September's Democratic primary.She is woman. Hear her roar.On drugs: "I believe there is a conspiracy. Black folks don't have planes to transport these drugs; we need to find the people that are bringing it in."On cutting the city budget: "I'm sure that in all of the departments that there are people who don't do anything."On campaign contributions: "I'm glad I'm not backed by the big money backers, because I can say no."
NEWS
September 8, 1998
WHENEVER Baltimore residents need a business or marriage license, buy or sell real estate or are involved in an equity, civil or criminal case, the Circuit Court clerk's office keeps a record. The volume of paperwork is huge: the office employs some 200 people and has a budget of more than $10 million.Since the August 1997 death of Saundra Banks, who was in the post for 14 years, the clerk's office has foundered.Recordkeeping has become sloppy, morale is bad and a number of disgusted veteran employees have taken jobs elsewhere.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
The focus for Carroll County going into this weekend's state wrestling tournament was clearly geared towards the individuals. They didn't disappoint.Moments before the start of last night's finals at Western Maryland College, North Carroll's Tommy Kiler was in the middle of a mat warming up and having some fun with South Carroll's Charlie Conaway and Mike Chenoweth.A little more than an hour later, all three had won state titles. It was Chenoweth's third, Kiler's second and Conaway's first.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
The nine sitting judges on Baltimore's Circuit Court were re-elected last night to the seats they were appointed to -- surviving a challenge by a city prosecutor.With 96 percent of the precincts counted, challenger Page Croyder was in last place in both the Democratic and Republican primaries. Croyder conceded defeat, saying she had no regrets about running."It was always an uphill battle," Croyder said. "But I call upon the judges to do a better job in the future because I am packing away my yard signs, and if they don't start doing a better job I may unpack them."
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Tommy Kiler grew up in a wrestling family. He started when he was 4 or 5 and remembers going to practice and not paying much attention at first.Mike Chenoweth was already playing basketball when he first gave wrestling a try in middle school. He liked basketball a lot more back then.Charlie Conaway first hit the mat at 9, wrestling for a Winfield Warriors "B" team. He took his lumps in that first year, taking a year off from the sport after that.And they all were there last Saturday, taking their turns atop the podium at South Carroll High, accepting their medals for winning county titles.
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