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ENTERTAINMENT
By Micahel Pakenham and Micahel Pakenham,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
There's nothing new about New Age spiritualism. Fantastical superstition will infest humankind as long as there are people who live in scorn or terror of reason. To most others, after the first look, the bulk of this bunk - from ouija boards to channeling - is both boring and trivial. This was not so, however, when two of the most imaginative and forceful men on earth carried the debate into a love-hate collision of epic magnitude. That tale is the subject of "Final Seance: The Strange Friendship Between Houdini and Conan Doyle," by Massimo Polidoro (Prometheus, 275 pages, $25)
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FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
Sure, there's a war going on and the economy's falling apart.Butto the 275 South Carroll residents who crammed the Liberty High School cafeteria last week for a meeting with county officials, there wasan even more pressing problem, one that affects them nearly every time they leave their homes.It's the intersection.Specifically, it's the recently redesigned intersection at Mineral Hill Road and Conan Doyle Way that they say is an accident waiting to happen."It's a joke, it's a fiasco," said Gary Hammond, whose house is less than 200 feet from the intersection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Abramowitz and Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 13, 1991
All along, Erin Road resident Marlene Chenowith and about 300 of herclosest friends and neighbors wanted a simple intersection where Mineral Hill Road meets a barely begun Conan Doyle Way.And all along, say she and other participants at a raucous public meeting over thecontroversial South Carroll intersection late last month, the countyhas ignored their pleas.Now, three months, 12 traffic signs, a new traffic pattern and hundreds of complaints later, the county is set to do what area residents say they have wanted from the beginning -- build the intersection so that Mineral Hill Road remains open for two-way, non-stop traffic and put a stop sign on Conan Doyle Way."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 7, 2002
Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 496 pages, $12.95) and Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 991 pages, $12.95) I have known people -- even one or two who are not pathological anglophobes--who just don't get what A. Conan Doyle is all about. Pity. I am hopelessly an enthusiast. The short stories and one of the novels -- I think it was The Hound of the Baskervilles -- were read to me by my father before I could read them myself.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Slipping Into Darkness Peter Blauner The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger W.W. Norton & Co. / 992 pages / $49.95 This book would have scored major points on appearance alone, with a handsome cover and well-designed slipcase. But it only takes a single glance inside the pages to behold Klinger's scholarship and breadth of knowledge of all things Holmesian (also in evidence in 2004's two-volume set of the complete short stories)
NEWS
November 21, 1997
Ingvar Johansson, 67, a Swedish pianist who played with some of jazz's biggest names before losing his right hand in an accident, died in his hometown of Ostersund, 250 miles northwest of Stockholm, the Swedish news agency TT reported Tuesday. It did not give the date or cause of death. After losing his hand, Mr. Johansson learned to play trombone.Robert Kane, 72, a travel writer who created the "A to Z" and "World at Its Best" series of guides, died of a heart attack Nov. 10 in New York.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Sherlock Holmes fans antsy with anticipation for the forthcoming extravaganza starring Robert Downey Jr. as the great detective and Jude Law as his sidekick, Dr. Watson, can settle down this weekend with the 1939 version of the most famous of all Holmes adventures, "The Hound of the Baskervilles." It's got the stately pace of old Hollywood glamour, camera work as static as England itself and a pervasive, soft-gray light that only dazzling black-and-white evening clothes cut through. But it's suffused with the qualities that made even that mystery-hating critic Edmund Wilson call the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle detective tales "among the most amusing of fairy tales."
NEWS
January 5, 1997
Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He attended Jesuit schools and entered the University of Edinburgh, where he studied medicine. It was there he came across Dr. Joseph Bell, whom he later used as a model for his Sherlock Holmes character.He began writing only after attempts at a medical career failed. In 1888 he published his first book featuring Holmes, "A Study in Scarlet." By 1891 his character had a large following and though Doyle wanted to write more serious literature, saying that Holmes "takes my mind from better things," the author wrote two dozen stories about his most famous character.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Sherlock Holmes fans antsy with anticipation for the forthcoming extravaganza starring Robert Downey Jr. as the great detective and Jude Law as his sidekick, Dr. Watson, can settle down this weekend with the 1939 version of the most famous of all Holmes adventures, "The Hound of the Baskervilles." It's got the stately pace of old Hollywood glamour, camera work as static as England itself and a pervasive, soft-gray light that only dazzling black-and-white evening clothes cut through. But it's suffused with the qualities that made even that mystery-hating critic Edmund Wilson call the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle detective tales "among the most amusing of fairy tales."
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Slipping Into Darkness Peter Blauner The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger W.W. Norton & Co. / 992 pages / $49.95 This book would have scored major points on appearance alone, with a handsome cover and well-designed slipcase. But it only takes a single glance inside the pages to behold Klinger's scholarship and breadth of knowledge of all things Holmesian (also in evidence in 2004's two-volume set of the complete short stories)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 7, 2002
Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 496 pages, $12.95) and Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 991 pages, $12.95) I have known people -- even one or two who are not pathological anglophobes--who just don't get what A. Conan Doyle is all about. Pity. I am hopelessly an enthusiast. The short stories and one of the novels -- I think it was The Hound of the Baskervilles -- were read to me by my father before I could read them myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Micahel Pakenham and Micahel Pakenham,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
There's nothing new about New Age spiritualism. Fantastical superstition will infest humankind as long as there are people who live in scorn or terror of reason. To most others, after the first look, the bulk of this bunk - from ouija boards to channeling - is both boring and trivial. This was not so, however, when two of the most imaginative and forceful men on earth carried the debate into a love-hate collision of epic magnitude. That tale is the subject of "Final Seance: The Strange Friendship Between Houdini and Conan Doyle," by Massimo Polidoro (Prometheus, 275 pages, $25)
NEWS
November 21, 1997
Ingvar Johansson, 67, a Swedish pianist who played with some of jazz's biggest names before losing his right hand in an accident, died in his hometown of Ostersund, 250 miles northwest of Stockholm, the Swedish news agency TT reported Tuesday. It did not give the date or cause of death. After losing his hand, Mr. Johansson learned to play trombone.Robert Kane, 72, a travel writer who created the "A to Z" and "World at Its Best" series of guides, died of a heart attack Nov. 10 in New York.
NEWS
January 5, 1997
Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He attended Jesuit schools and entered the University of Edinburgh, where he studied medicine. It was there he came across Dr. Joseph Bell, whom he later used as a model for his Sherlock Holmes character.He began writing only after attempts at a medical career failed. In 1888 he published his first book featuring Holmes, "A Study in Scarlet." By 1891 his character had a large following and though Doyle wanted to write more serious literature, saying that Holmes "takes my mind from better things," the author wrote two dozen stories about his most famous character.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Abramowitz and Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
They gather together every other month for an evening of mystery and crime. These salespeople, lawyers, government workers, psychiatrists, bank employees and others seem an unlikely group to wallow in such debauchery.But their wallowing takes them back to earlier times. Much earlier. Those who gather are Sherlock Holmes aficionados, and darn proud of it, thank you. Now, one such group in Baltimore is celebrating 50 years of coming together to enjoy, dissect and discuss that "great Victorian detective" Sherlock Holmes and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 13, 1991
All along, Erin Road resident Marlene Chenowith and about 300 of herclosest friends and neighbors wanted a simple intersection where Mineral Hill Road meets a barely begun Conan Doyle Way.And all along, say she and other participants at a raucous public meeting over thecontroversial South Carroll intersection late last month, the countyhas ignored their pleas.Now, three months, 12 traffic signs, a new traffic pattern and hundreds of complaints later, the county is set to do what area residents say they have wanted from the beginning -- build the intersection so that Mineral Hill Road remains open for two-way, non-stop traffic and put a stop sign on Conan Doyle Way."
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