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By Mike Giuliano | August 23, 2011
"Conan the Barbarian" is a juvenile fantasy, but it has so much sword-swinging violence that the movie merits its "R" rating. Although the muscular title character survives intact, he often finds himself stepping over the severed limbs of warriors who did not fare as well on the battlefield. The combat almost never stops in a movie that really does not have anything else on its Dark Ages mind. As mindless entertainment goes, "Conan the Barbarian" stays so strictly within its fighting formula that its moment-to-moment thrills quickly prove tiresome.
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SPORTS
January 1, 2013
The senior dominated the 170-pound class at the Mount Mat Madness tournament at UMBC this weekend, pinning all five of his opponents in the first period to become the Dons' first-ever individual champion at the prestigious event. Schuster, who is ranked No. 2 in the weight class by the Maryland State Wrestling Association, closed out the impressive outing with a 57-second fall against Huntingtown's No. 7-ranked Colton Rowe in Saturday's title bout. He is 14-0 on the season with all of his wins coming by pins - 13 in the first period.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 9, 2010
(From the Z on TV blog) I was not a big fan of Conan last year on NBC. I thought he was too nervous, needy and always trying too hard to be a network star in some weird sense he had of the Johnny Carson tradition. But I kind of like the guy and show I saw Monday night on TBS. He seems more certain of who he is and comfortable and confident in that role. If he was pitcher in baseball, I would say he's playing within himself instead of trying to throw too hard. He's not straining and begging to be loved the way he was last year.
EXPLORE
September 3, 2011
now playing "Apollo 18" (PG-13). Supposed "lost footage"-style movie details the mission of Apollo 18. Two American astronauts are sent on a secret mission to the moon, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. TownMall Cinemas (1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 10:00) "Colombiana" (PG-13). A young woman (Zoe Saldana), grows up to be an assassin after witnessing the murder of her parents as a child. TownMall Cinemas (1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05) "Conan the Barbarian" (R)
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Conan . . . Conan . . . Conan . . . he's gone.WMAR (Channel 2) has dropped the "Conan O'Brien Show" from its late-night lineup, with last Monday night's program being the last broadcast. Jon Stewart's syndicated talk show slipped into the old 12:30 p.m. time slot starting last night, according to WMAR General Manager Joe Lewin."[Conan] really hasn't done that well in this market," said Mr. Lewin. "We gave the show every opportunity -- we gave it the time slot, we promoted it -- it just wasn't going to make it."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 4, 1993
It was Conan and the barbarians here last night.When Conan O'Brien, the unknown picked to replace David Letterman as NBC's late-night talk show host, walked into the Rainbow Room atop the Rockefeller Center for a news conference, a pack of about 30 photographers rushed forward, surrounded him and spent the next five minutes jostling, shooting and shouting "Conan, Conan, look this way. Conan, Conan, smile."Among them was renowned photographer Annie Leibowitz. That's the kind of attention the 30-year-old O'Brien has been getting since NBC announced last week that he would take over the late-night spot in August when Letterman leaves for CBS."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
NEWARK, N.J. - In the radio world, Neal Conan had it all: a show on National Public Radio, 15 million listeners and the chance to cover wars and international summits. Now, as the play-by-play announcer for the Aberdeen Arsenal - a new minor league baseball team based in Harford County - he spends his days in such hot spots as Bridgeport, Conn., rides buses all night and longer, and eats too many muffins from hotel breakfast bars. What some will do for the love of baseball. Conan, 50, has taken a six-month leave of absence from NPR, trading in 23 years on its news staff, his own weekly show and national renown, for 140 one-man broadcasts on Harford Community Radio, WHFC 91.1 FM - a station with one full-time employee and a signal that barely reaches Baltimore County.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
PoliceEldersburg: A resident of Conan Doyle Drive told police Tuesday that the vinyl siding on his home was damaged by a BB gun within the past two weeks. Damage was estimated at $250.Pub Date: 10/09/97
NEWS
August 25, 1993
FIRE* Sykesville: Sykesville firefighters responded for a fire alarm sounding in a building on Conan Doyle Way at 8:28 p.m. Monday. They were out for 30 minutes.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 1, 2003
Scientists are working to perfect a "superbug" to help clean up toxic wastes at thousands of radioactive sites worldwide. The mighty microbe - nicknamed "Conan the Bacterium" - combines the genes of two bacteria to perform a job neither could do on its own. The composite creature "can live quite happily in an environment with 1 million times the radiation a human cell could tolerate," Department of Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham said at a news conference...
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 23, 2011
"Conan the Barbarian" is a juvenile fantasy, but it has so much sword-swinging violence that the movie merits its "R" rating. Although the muscular title character survives intact, he often finds himself stepping over the severed limbs of warriors who did not fare as well on the battlefield. The combat almost never stops in a movie that really does not have anything else on its Dark Ages mind. As mindless entertainment goes, "Conan the Barbarian" stays so strictly within its fighting formula that its moment-to-moment thrills quickly prove tiresome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 24, 2011
The disastrous start to Newt Gingrich's presidential campaign is serving up plenty of fodder for late night comedians.  After flip-flopping on Paul Ryan's budget proposal (and then claiming anyone who quoted him directly was spreading falsehoods, which was roundly mocked on Comedy Central), and then having his press aide send out a statement depicting him in an epic, machine-gun battle with sheep (which was also roundly mocked), Gingrich is now under fire for apparently running up a high jewelry bill at Tiffany's (reportedly as much as $250,000 to $500,000)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 7, 2011
Everyone knows there will be a movie made about the death of Osama bin Laden. But who will play whom? Conan O'Brien has the answers:  (Spoiler alert: Joe Biden will be played by Bob Barker.)   
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 5, 2011
There's been a lot of talk about who will take over terrorist organization Al-Qaeda now that Osama bin Laden is dead. While most predict Ayman Al-Zawahiri will rise to take the reigns of the organization, Conan O'Brien has some alternatives -- and he's not too worried about them.  For the second show in a row last night, Conan mercilessly mocked the terrorist members of the organization, giving them embarrassing nickname after embarrassing nickname....
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 9, 2010
(From the Z on TV blog) I was not a big fan of Conan last year on NBC. I thought he was too nervous, needy and always trying too hard to be a network star in some weird sense he had of the Johnny Carson tradition. But I kind of like the guy and show I saw Monday night on TBS. He seems more certain of who he is and comfortable and confident in that role. If he was pitcher in baseball, I would say he's playing within himself instead of trying to throw too hard. He's not straining and begging to be loved the way he was last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
That gigantic orange blimp flying over downtown Baltimore 4:30 p.m. Wednesday will be the work of comedian Conan O'Brien. The funnyman is using the flying machine to drum up buzz about "Conan," his return to late night television on TBS, which premieres November 8. The blimp has been traveling along the East Coast the entire month of October. Upon spotting the blimp, fans can check in on Foursquare to unlock a special Conan badge. In addition, the promotion also includes social networking giant Twitter.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | April 28, 1991
HILLSBORO -- If a census taker were to arrive at my doorstep, the questions on cars, boats, mortgages, dogs and children all could be answered: two of each.The cars, boats and dogs all are a little worse for the wear, but the children, Conan and The Barbarian, are as obdurate as granite.Conan, a 9-year-old, left-handed second baseman, has an affection for pocket knives and campfire soot.The Barbarian, a 7-year-old shooting guard without a shot, is partial to Nintendo games, televised pro wrestling and needling Conan.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 17, 1993
With Jay and Dave and Arsenio and Chevy and Conan all on now, it seems that I . . . I don't sleep well anymore.The other night I had a dream.Arsenio was wearing a loud turquoise and silver jacket and black toreador pants. He looked into the camera and shouted: "Yasser Arafat in the house, ladies and gentlemen! Give it up for the main man of the PLO!"Of course, the audience gave it up. There was thunderousapplause and all that WOOF! WOOF! WOOF! business. Arafat walked out on stage smiling broadly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Sun TV critic | January 24, 2010
A fter a surreal week of high emotion and comic abuse of NBC on "The Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien," the 46-year-old host is gone for good from the network's airwaves after only seven months in Johnny Carson's old chair. But the story of this misguided adventure in prime-time and late-night programming by NBC's top brass is far from over. The narrative of O'Brien being pushed out of the job he prepared himself for over five years to make room for Jay Leno, who failed miserably in prime time, demands some discussion about what happens next to the redhead.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | January 18, 2010
Any working stiff watching the temper tantrum Tonight Show host Conan O'Brien threw on national television last week must be feeling something besides a tickle in the ribs. Catharsis. After just seven months in the job he waited years for, Mr. O'Brien woke up one morning to find that his employers wanted to push him deeper into the night to make room for Jay Leno. He not only refused to go, he pushed back. Unlike the rest of the American work force, most of which has found itself badly used by its employers of late, Mr. O'Brien got to rip into the NBC suits in front of a national television audience.
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