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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
After more than a dozen years fighting side by side in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Army and the National Guard are battling each other over budget cuts. The Army, tasked with restructuring for a postwar future amid rising personnel costs and spending cuts ordered by Congress, has proposed reducing the number of national guardsmen nationwide by 10 percent - from 350,000 soldiers to as few as 315,000 by 2019. In Maryland, that could mean the loss of 400 to 500 soldiers from the 4,700-member Maryland Army National Guard, according to Maj. Gen. James A. Adkins.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | June 1, 1993
JOHANNESBURG -- For South Africa, yesterday's Comrades Marathon is the New York and Boston marathons wrapped up into one. It has the tradition of Boston and the popularity of New York.And at 55 miles it's also longer than those two 26.2-mile races put together.With that in mind, try to decide which is crazier: that 14,000 people run the Comrades every year, or that much of the country spends its Republic Day holiday watching them do it on television.In that way, the Comrades is like the Kentucky Derby in that as the race approaches, millions become avid fans and would-be experts of a sport they pay little attention to the rest of the year.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
It was the kind of mission that Warrant Officer George Carlton Bloodworth flew daily in Vietnam. But on Sept. 20, 1969, it went badly wrong. Bloodworth was piloting the second of two scout helicopters on a reconnaissance mission over the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam, speeding 100 feet off the ground, when the lead helicopter was shot down. As he circled back to search for its two-man crew, his own helicopter was shot down, and he was hit by ground fire. Still, he found the downed crew and helped lead the wounded pilot, the pilot's crew chief and his own crew chief through withering fire to safety.
SPORTS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 17, 1996
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Bruce Fordyce lives in a fine house in one of Johannesburg's oldest suburban neighborhoods. The garden is filled with flowers and a frisky golden retriever. The interior is stylishly decorated. There's a swimming pool out back.He can afford this lifestyle for one reason -- in the 1980s, he could run the 55 miles between the cities of Durban and Pietermaritzburg faster than any other South African.In any other country, this would make Fordyce an oddity, up there with flagpole sitters or plate spinners or those who jump rope for three days to get into the "Guinness Book of World Records."
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 4, 1999
PETROVAC, Macedonia -- Staff Sgt. Chris Stone's voice was so flat, so unemotional, that when he radioed for help Wednesday, his superior officer, Sgt. 1st Class Jim LaShelle, didn't think he was serious and began to cut him off. "Grid 675 -- " Stone said, before LaShelle broke in on the radio line to make sure Stone wasn't kidding. But that was only half of a six-digit number needed to locate Stone and two other soldiers whose Humvee had been surrounded by Serbs. When Stone repeated that they were taking direct fire, LaShelle knew it was true and bolted up straight.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 8, 2005
DURBAN, South Africa - Jogging through his hilly neighborhood last week, Billy Mattig said he knows no man can run forever. He just wants to complete the 55-mile Comrades Marathon twice more. Then he'll take it easy. "When you get older," the former railroad worker said, "you feel the hills more." Mattig, for the record, is 80. He has entered the annual ultramarathon 25 times, finishing 18. Far from an anomaly, he is part of a national obsession that has made the race into an annual spectacle, an event that, on June 16, millions of South Africans will watch on television from dawn to dusk.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 18, 1991
Cheer up. The General Assembly is on the job.Gorbachev cut guns from the budget. Comrades ask, "Where's the butter?"
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 28, 1991
The good news is that the evil Soviet Union is disintegrating. The bad news is that instead of three votes at the United Nations, they will now get 15.High school student SAT scores are lower than ever, but since fewer than ever can afford college, freshmen-admit scores will -- rise.Some comrades want to link the economies of the Soviet republics while other comrades ask, what economies?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 7, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe - She has to call the young men her "comrades." She cooks food for the comrades and serves them. She sweeps the comrades' floor and cleans up after them. And whenever any of the comrades wants sex, she is raped. Asiatu, 21, is a prisoner of the comrades at a command base of the ruling ZANU-PF, one of 900 set up by the party to terrorize Zimbabweans into voting Robert G. Mugabe back into power in the one-man presidential runoff election late last month. The election is over, but the terror isn't.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Navy linebacker Brye French had never met Brendan Looney, only hearing stories about the former academy lacrosse star and his two brothers from longtime coach Richie Meade. Then one day during French's sophomore year, Meade told his team that the eldest Looney brother had died in Iraq. French, who had come to Navy to play both lacrosse and football, began to understand the reasons he was in Annapolis when he heard about Looney's death in a helicopter crash. It was further clarified for French when the lacrosse team attended the funeral of Navy SEAL from Silver Spring.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
You guys really make me laugh ("Obama and judicial review," April 6). You write: "Here's an idea. Could everyone agree, between now and November to engage in genuine debate about issues affecting the American people?" Every time Comrade Barack Obama missteps, there is an excuse, but let one of the Republicans make a mistake and The Sun gets up on it left leg and has one big hissy-fit. This guy wants to get reelected and really doesn't care how he does it, and neither do you. And last but not least, do you think Mr. Obama really cares about "issues affecting the American people?"
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
Robert Burns hasn't been able to walk since the day 30 years ago when a chunk of rock fell on his spine as he toiled on hands and knees in a West Virginia coal mine near the Maryland line. The 1980 mishap that put him in a wheelchair was "just freak," he said. "I was in the wrong place, that was it." This week Burns, like many here in Western Maryland's rolling coal country, has closely tracked news of the West Virginia mine explosion that killed at least 25 miners. Burns, 58, isn't blaming mine operator Massey Energy Co., despite reports of serious violations at its Upper Big Branch mine in the months before Monday's blast.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 7, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe - She has to call the young men her "comrades." She cooks food for the comrades and serves them. She sweeps the comrades' floor and cleans up after them. And whenever any of the comrades wants sex, she is raped. Asiatu, 21, is a prisoner of the comrades at a command base of the ruling ZANU-PF, one of 900 set up by the party to terrorize Zimbabweans into voting Robert G. Mugabe back into power in the one-man presidential runoff election late last month. The election is over, but the terror isn't.
NEWS
By Tony Perry | September 19, 2007
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif.-- --The names - while comic - were meant to reflect an unfunny reality: the sometimes overbearing stress felt by Marines and sailors serving in Iraq. Such as Corporal Angermode, who after a roadside bomb exploded in Iraq began telling his fellow Marines that he couldn't wait to begin killing Iraqis. Chief Screamer, who dealt with his stress by screaming at everyone. And Lance Corporal Stoneface, who just shut down emotionally and kept silently to himself. In a recent lecture to newly promoted corporals, Navy Cmdr.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | July 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- They met at a gathering of exiles in 1898, two revolutionary-minded activists with a penchant for talking politics and literature. He was attracted by her ideas, her morality, her kind but serious eyes. Felix Dzerzhinsky fell deeply in love. The man who would later direct the first Soviet secret police and orchestrate the purges of the Red Terror is famously known as "Iron Felix," a name befitting his blind devotion to the Bolshevik cause and his utter ruthlessness in eliminating enemies, real or perceived.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2000
SOMMOCOLONIA, Italy - Albert O. Burke, 80, silently strolled around the ruins of a medieval fortress in the village where dozens of black servicemen were killed Dec. 26, 1944, and broke down. "I felt I owed it to the fellows to come back," he sobbed as two other frail veterans held him up. "But I don't think I want to come back here anymore." The place that stirred him so deeply was Sommocolonia, a poignant footnote in both World War II military history and the uncompleted story of America's black war veterans.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 20, 2000
In this presidential election year, a soldier from North Laurel and a naval officer from Arizona are setting the tone. In their unique ways and on different stages, Alfred V. Rascon and Sen. John McCain, have what Americans crave: courage, humility, determination. In different ways, they started toward the year 2000 from the war in Vietnam and suddenly find themselves headed toward the White House -- to be honored for the sacrifices they made for comrades and for country. Mr. McCain, of course, is a Republican running for president.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | May 27, 2007
Wally Mueller vividly remembers his buddies who were killed in combat. He thinks about them when he's driving his car, or marching with the American Legion color guard, or talking to children about patriotism and the meaning of Memorial Day. "Memorial Day is a day set aside to remember all service members who have paid the ultimate price for their country," the decorated retired Army colonel said. "It's a day to honor those who made it possible for us to be free." Although the 64-year-old Bel Air resident returned from Vietnam almost 40 years ago, his memories of the war are indelibly etched in his mind.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | May 15, 2007
An Annapolis-area Marine known as the "Lion of Fallujah" was killed Friday in Iraq while commanding a raid on insurgent forces in Baghdad, military officials said yesterday. Maj. Douglas A. Zembiec, a 1995 Naval Academy graduate who was awarded the Bronze Star with a V for valor for his actions in Fallujah in 2004 and also received a Purple Heart, will be buried tomorrow with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. An unabashed warrior who considered it an honor to lead his Marines into combat, Major Zembiec, 34, had a reputation for inspiring his men with a selfless, lead-from-the-front philosophy.
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