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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
Four years after the Michelangelo computer virus wreaked havoc on personal computer users, the old nemesis or something similar to it has bedeviled hard drives at the Howard County Sheriff's Department.The department and county computer technicians worked feverishly this week to restore files gobbled by the virus, which struck two computers on the system's network March 6, the birthday of the legendary Italian Renaissance artist for which it is named.Sheriff Michael A. Chiuchiolo said the virus caused only a temporary headache.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
A Hungarian man who blackmailed a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job was sentenced to 2.5 years in prison, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, was also sentenced to serve three years of supervised release following his time in prison, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Nemeth pleaded guilty in November to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system.
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NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Anne Arundel County school officials shut down the district's 7,000 personal computers yesterday after eight terminals showed symptoms of a menacing computer virus named for the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.The Chernobyl virus erases a computer's hard drive and replaces its vital system settings with gibberish. Believed to have originated in Taiwan, it was timed to strike yesterday, on the Russian nuclear accident's 13th anniversary.When school officials arrived at the district's central office in Annapolis at 8: 30 a.m., they found eight of their computers malfunctioning, and immediately suspected the worst.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
A Hungarian man's attempt to blackmail a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job landed him in U.S. custody, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, pleaded guilty to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Marriott is headquartered in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2004
BERLIN - In the end, police discovered the source of the Sasser computer worm, which in recent days shut down Finnish banks, the British Coast Guard and millions of computers worldwide, in the homemade computer of an 18-year-old. Acting on a tip from software giant Microsoft, police raced into the northern German village of Waffensen, near Bremen, on Friday to search the home of a technical school student-programmer and hacker. By yesterday, the student had confessed, experts had reviewed seized materials and the case was seen as a wrap.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Anne Arundel County school officials got the system's central computers back up and running yesterday, after thwarting a computer virus that had threatened to destroy dozens of school computers across the county.Many schools' computers are still down, especially those at smaller schools, though officials hope they will be checked out and "cleaned" by the end of the week.Eight computers hit by the Chernobyl virus initially, however, might be gone for good. Technicians were able to save much of the information stored on the hard drives, but the computers are, in effect, telling themselves not to restart, said Robert C. Leib, director of business services for the schools.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
Four years after the Michelangelo computer virus wreaked havoc on personal computer users, the old nemesis or something similar to it has bedeviled hard drives at the Howard County Sheriff's Department.The department and county computer technicians worked feverishly this week to restore files gobbled by the virus, which struck two computers on the system's network March 6, the birthday of the legendary Italian Renaissance artist for which it is named.Sheriff Michael A. Chiuchiolo said the virus caused only a temporary headache.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
So what if your faithful PC should turn against you? Your Facebook is posting pornography. Your Twitter followers are being urged to advocate for the violent overthrow of the government, and your bank account's online bill pay is transferring large amounts from your savings to total strangers. Can't happen, you say? Think again. A computer virus called the Conficker worm capable of all of that and more is out there lurking. It has invaded more than 12 million computers around the world and continues to infect more every day. Last week, an army of security experts working to counter Conficker heaved a collective sigh of relief when many of the infected computers successfully executed a command to phone home but the worm took no further action.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
State and federal officials in New Jersey said yesterday that they have found the Melissa computer virus' creator: a 30-year-old computer programmer who purportedly named the glitch after a topless dancer in Florida.The suspect, David L. Smith of Aberdeen Township, N.J., was arrested by state police Thursday night at his brother's house in nearby Eatontown.Since its emergence March 26, the Melissa virus has attacked e-mail systems around the world. Melissa propagates itself whenever a user opens an e-mail message containing an infected document.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 20, 1999
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Wake up, America!Movie-theater seats are being booby-trapped with HIV-infected needles!The post office is going to start taxing your e-mail correspondence!You're on the verge of winning a trip to Disney World, a six-pack of beer and clothing from the Gap, but you must act now!Sounds unbelievable, doesn't it?So why would so many people accept such incredible statements at face value? Because they came across on e-mail.Hoaxes, chain letters and urban myths have been around a long time, but e-mail imbues them with a certain legitimacy and spreads them faster than a bad rash.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
So what if your faithful PC should turn against you? Your Facebook is posting pornography. Your Twitter followers are being urged to advocate for the violent overthrow of the government, and your bank account's online bill pay is transferring large amounts from your savings to total strangers. Can't happen, you say? Think again. A computer virus called the Conficker worm capable of all of that and more is out there lurking. It has invaded more than 12 million computers around the world and continues to infect more every day. Last week, an army of security experts working to counter Conficker heaved a collective sigh of relief when many of the infected computers successfully executed a command to phone home but the worm took no further action.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Viruses have crippled state computers used to track and distribute welfare benefits, sending officials scrambling to fix the equipment and raising concerns among advocates that needy clients could be left without assistance. Officials said yesterday that the problem - diagnosed about a week ago - was under control, and that the attack had not delayed benefits such as food stamps and emergency cash. "Things aren't falling apart," said Kirk A. Grothe, chief information officer for the Office of Technology for Human Services, a division of the Maryland Department of Human Resources.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 2004
BERLIN - In the end, police discovered the source of the Sasser computer worm, which in recent days shut down Finnish banks, the British Coast Guard and millions of computers worldwide, in the homemade computer of an 18-year-old. Acting on a tip from software giant Microsoft, police raced into the northern German village of Waffensen, near Bremen, on Friday to search the home of a technical school student-programmer and hacker. By yesterday, the student had confessed, experts had reviewed seized materials and the case was seen as a wrap.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
K.C. Hopson knew there was trouble when a customer called his Ellicott City company, EventRebels.com, with problems registering for a conference on his Web site. The second clue that something was terribly awry surfaced when Hopson's employees began receiving more than 40 e-mail messages addressed to people who don't work for the online registration company. "We deleted all of the e-mails, immediately," Hopson said yesterday after his business was one of thousands across the country struck by an e-mail virus named "MyDoom" or "Novarg.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2004
Branch offices of the state Motor Vehicle Administration could not complete some transactions for about an hour yesterday morning because a glitch kept them from connecting with the agency's mainframe computer, officials said. The glitch was the result of a software update over the weekend and was discovered when branch offices opened at 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The problem was fixed and the system was back up by 9:35. MVA offices were shut down for a day in August when the agency's computers crashed because of a computer virus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2001
Let me tell you about the best four bucks ever spent on software. The money - for $4.19, to be exact - was the price of renewing my anti-virus software subscription for another year. I paid somewhat reluctantly back in March. Now I'm ecstatic that I did. In years past, I must confess, I've been lax about safeguarding my computer against viruses by using anti-virus software. That's because for most of my time, online viruses have been little more than an occasional annoyance. The really nasty ones seemed to self-destruct before reaching my PC. And the harmless ones - the ones that simply replicate and pass themselves on - generally went unnoticed.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
A Hungarian man's attempt to blackmail a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job landed him in U.S. custody, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, pleaded guilty to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Marriott is headquartered in Montgomery County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brendan A. Maher and Brendan A. Maher,Contributing Writer | May 14, 2000
David Chess has been with IBM for 20 years, nearly as long as there have been personal computers. For the past 12 years, his sole concentration has been on those nasty bugs most everyone with a PC and Internet access loves to hate-- the computer virus. Chess, 40, one of a handful of virus doctors at the computer giant, spends his time ferreting out not only the viral code that infects our systems and makes us miserable, but the glitches and niches in existing software that make it possible for viruses to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2001
Is there no sure inoculation for all these computer viruses? Seems not. But the Web can tell you a lot about them, why they exist, and what to do (and not do) about them. CERT On any given day, this site can set you quivering with fear over the latest viruses, worms, Trojan horses and other malicious computer attacks. CERT means "computer emergency response team," we think. We couldn't find it spelled out on the site. www.cert.org/ VIRUS FAQS Don't know the Morris worm from the ILOVEYOU virus?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 16, 2000
REDMOND, Wash. - Microsoft Corp., the world's largest software maker, said yesterday that it will offer two new security features to prevent computer viruses from using its e-mail to infect computer networks and spread to other users. Microsoft will offer software upgrades for its popular Outlook e-mail program that will prevent a piece of "executable code" from coming attached to e-mail. The recent love bug virus, which spread via Microsoft software and infected more than 45 million computers, wreaking $10 billion in damage, included code attached to e-mail that destroyed files when opened, or executed.
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