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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Some of those who came to play at Hot Spot Sweepstakes in Towson on Wednesday afternoon walked away disappointed. Some seemed stunned. Finding the door locked, they peeked into the tinted storefront window to see a dark room and tables and chairs, but none of the computer terminals where some spent hours a week playing a slots game for cash prizes. The game room with 100 computer terminals had been shut down and cleared of all machines earlier in the day by Baltimore County police officers, who hit the location on Goucher Boulevard in Towson and nine other places in the county in a sweep culminating an investigation that began late last year.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Some of those who came to play at Hot Spot Sweepstakes in Towson on Wednesday afternoon walked away disappointed. Some seemed stunned. Finding the door locked, they peeked into the tinted storefront window to see a dark room and tables and chairs, but none of the computer terminals where some spent hours a week playing a slots game for cash prizes. The game room with 100 computer terminals had been shut down and cleared of all machines earlier in the day by Baltimore County police officers, who hit the location on Goucher Boulevard in Towson and nine other places in the county in a sweep culminating an investigation that began late last year.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Anne Arundel County police officials presented capital budget requests yesterday for $1.7 million worth of projects in the 1996 fiscal year, including money to begin installing computers in patrol cars.Four of the "smart cars" developed by Linthicum-based Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group were tested over a six-month period last year in the Eastern District.Police officials say they think the computers, which would give officers access to Motor Vehicle Administration, county police and national crime databases, can help them do their jobs more effectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Joseph A. Slobodzian,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 28, 2002
This was an incident that seemed to illustrate perfectly the need for the Children's Internet Protection Act, the federal law that would require libraries to install Internet filtering software as a condition of receiving federal technology funds. The case involved illegal child pornography found in a lavatory trash bin of the public library in Sun Prairie, Wis. - material apparently downloaded from an Internet site on one of the library's public computer terminals. As police moved in and confiscated the library's 26 computer terminals, testified librarian Peter Hamon, it seemed a good time to test the filtering software.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | October 30, 1990
Normally these people type into a computer the Baltimore City Jail records, water bill readings and parking fine amounts.But last night they were counting votes.Baltimore's Board of Election Supervisors, in an effort to avoid the problems that plagued the vote count on the night of this year's primary election, had a trial run in anticipation of next Tuesday's general election.Everything appeared to run smoothly as more than a dozen municipal data-entry clerks from almost every city agency -- assisted by election board employees -- punched in numbers from simulated returns.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 11, 1992
Another federal holiday is in the offing. But federal workers shouldn't get too excited because it'll be an unpaid holiday.The House Post Office and Civil Service Committee meets today to complete work on legislation that would designate Election Day a national holiday.The measure, designed to boost voter turnout, would make the first Tuesday in November in even-numbered years Democracy Day.Lawmakers say making Democracy Day a paid holiday would be too expensive.New agreementThe Social Security Administration and the American Federation of Government Employees recently signed an agreement that expands employees' rights and mandates improvements in working conditions.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 6, 1996
IBM Corp. has begun making cheap, stripped-down "network computers" that might one day replace millions of powerful desktop machines now used in corporate America. The new International Business Machines Network Station will be the first real-world test of the controversial network computing concept.The Network Station will sell for about $700, compared with typical desktop computer prices of $2,000 or more. But unlike the standard desktop machine, the Network Station won't be able to do very much on its own.It relies on a computer chip that is widely used in cable TV decoder boxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Joseph A. Slobodzian,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 28, 2002
This was an incident that seemed to illustrate perfectly the need for the Children's Internet Protection Act, the federal law that would require libraries to install Internet filtering software as a condition of receiving federal technology funds. The case involved illegal child pornography found in a lavatory trash bin of the public library in Sun Prairie, Wis. - material apparently downloaded from an Internet site on one of the library's public computer terminals. As police moved in and confiscated the library's 26 computer terminals, testified librarian Peter Hamon, it seemed a good time to test the filtering software.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | March 8, 1995
The future is now. That's being driven forcefully home in 1995 as technology commands more and more attention on the nation's magazine covers and in its news headlines.Intrigue! We've seen an Internet bandit apprehended after capturing 20,000 live credit card numbers. Though such attacks usually aren't against home computers, always take steps to guard your personal data.Power! A federal judge struck down an antitrust settlement against techno-giant Microsoft Corp. because the agreement was too soft.
BUSINESS
By Robin Stacy and Robin Stacy,Knight-Ridder News Service VNB | April 13, 1992
In an earlier day, correspondence was king.People conducted business, fell in love or discussed ideas, all by letter.Then came the telegraph, and the letter's decline began. This new thing brought speed -- you could communicate your thoughts instantly. That your thoughts were no longer conveyed as a well-thought-out bit of prose was just an unfortunate consequence.The telephone seemed to ring the letter's death knell.But just as technology nearly brought the letter's demise, it's now providing its salvation.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 6, 1996
IBM Corp. has begun making cheap, stripped-down "network computers" that might one day replace millions of powerful desktop machines now used in corporate America. The new International Business Machines Network Station will be the first real-world test of the controversial network computing concept.The Network Station will sell for about $700, compared with typical desktop computer prices of $2,000 or more. But unlike the standard desktop machine, the Network Station won't be able to do very much on its own.It relies on a computer chip that is widely used in cable TV decoder boxes.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | March 8, 1995
The future is now. That's being driven forcefully home in 1995 as technology commands more and more attention on the nation's magazine covers and in its news headlines.Intrigue! We've seen an Internet bandit apprehended after capturing 20,000 live credit card numbers. Though such attacks usually aren't against home computers, always take steps to guard your personal data.Power! A federal judge struck down an antitrust settlement against techno-giant Microsoft Corp. because the agreement was too soft.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Anne Arundel County police officials presented capital budget requests yesterday for $1.7 million worth of projects in the 1996 fiscal year, including money to begin installing computers in patrol cars.Four of the "smart cars" developed by Linthicum-based Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group were tested over a six-month period last year in the Eastern District.Police officials say they think the computers, which would give officers access to Motor Vehicle Administration, county police and national crime databases, can help them do their jobs more effectively.
NEWS
By Jody Roesler and Jody Roesler,Contributing Writer | October 1, 1993
Eastern District police officers won't say 10-4. They won't call in license and registration information. They won't have to write or remember 911 information while speeding to a robbery-in-progress.They won't even have to do hours of paperwork after their shifts.No, the officers are not getting laid-off or lazy. They are getting four "Smart Cars" from Westinghouse, to be tested and evaluated over the next year, beginning next week.The Smart Car is a standard police cruiser equipped with a computer connection with other Smart Cars, several law enforcement data bases and the dispatcher.
BUSINESS
By Robin Stacy and Robin Stacy,Knight-Ridder News Service VNB | April 13, 1992
In an earlier day, correspondence was king.People conducted business, fell in love or discussed ideas, all by letter.Then came the telegraph, and the letter's decline began. This new thing brought speed -- you could communicate your thoughts instantly. That your thoughts were no longer conveyed as a well-thought-out bit of prose was just an unfortunate consequence.The telephone seemed to ring the letter's death knell.But just as technology nearly brought the letter's demise, it's now providing its salvation.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | March 11, 1992
Another federal holiday is in the offing. But federal workers shouldn't get too excited because it'll be an unpaid holiday.The House Post Office and Civil Service Committee meets today to complete work on legislation that would designate Election Day a national holiday.The measure, designed to boost voter turnout, would make the first Tuesday in November in even-numbered years Democracy Day.Lawmakers say making Democracy Day a paid holiday would be too expensive.New agreementThe Social Security Administration and the American Federation of Government Employees recently signed an agreement that expands employees' rights and mandates improvements in working conditions.
NEWS
By Jody Roesler and Jody Roesler,Contributing Writer | October 1, 1993
Eastern District police officers won't say 10-4. They won't call in license and registration information. They won't have to write or remember 911 information while speeding to a robbery-in-progress.They won't even have to do hours of paperwork after their shifts.No, the officers are not getting laid-off or lazy. They are getting four "Smart Cars" from Westinghouse, to be tested and evaluated over the next year, beginning next week.The Smart Car is a standard police cruiser equipped with a computer connection with other Smart Cars, several law enforcement data bases and the dispatcher.
NEWS
By Luther Young | December 7, 1990
The roller-coaster saga of the Astro-1 space shuttle mission took another stomach-churning plunge early yesterday with the shutdown of an essential computer terminal the astronauts had used with great success to point the instruments at celestial targets Wednesday night.But the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, after a frenzied day of trouble-shooting, was successful yesterday evening in restoring the $150 million observatory to limited operation through a complex combination of ground controls from Marshall Space Flight Center and manual fine-pointing by the astronauts.
NEWS
By Luther Young | December 7, 1990
The roller-coaster saga of the Astro-1 space shuttle mission took another stomach-churning plunge early yesterday with the shutdown of an essential computer terminal the astronauts had used with great success to point the instruments at celestial targets Wednesday night.But the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, after a frenzied day of trouble-shooting, was successful yesterday evening in restoring the $150 million observatory to limited operation through a complex combination of ground controls from Marshall Space Flight Center and manual fine-pointing by the astronauts.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | October 30, 1990
Normally these people type into a computer the Baltimore City Jail records, water bill readings and parking fine amounts.But last night they were counting votes.Baltimore's Board of Election Supervisors, in an effort to avoid the problems that plagued the vote count on the night of this year's primary election, had a trial run in anticipation of next Tuesday's general election.Everything appeared to run smoothly as more than a dozen municipal data-entry clerks from almost every city agency -- assisted by election board employees -- punched in numbers from simulated returns.
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