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By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | May 11, 1992
The county has postponed, but not given up, plans to merge its computer system with those of the school system and Anne Arundel Community College.Following a free four-week IBM study into the merits of combining the computer system, the county has cited a $850,000 price tag, and no immediate cost savings for the fiscal year beginning July 11, as its reasons for postponing the proposed merger."
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Two weeks after the Social Security Administration received a report criticizing management for a dysfunctional, $300 million computer system, agency officials provided only a cursory summary of the findings at a meeting of a committee overseeing the project, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. According to minutes from a June 17 steering committee meeting, agency officials provided limited detail about the report - noting only one of its recommendations, for instance. That lends credibility to claims by congressional Republicans that top officials at the Woodlawn-based agency delayed releasing its full details.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1994
Hackers in the United States and abroad have gained access to hundreds of sensitive but unclassified government and military computer networks on the global Internet network, computer security experts said yesterday.While most of the intruders appear to be out for the computer equivalent of a joy ride, federal investigators say that some of them have been able to take control of several military computer systems, allowing them to steal, alter or erase computer records, even to shut the computer systems down.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In baseball, it turns out, making a perfect schedule can be as elusive as throwing a perfect game. There are a lot of rules, starting with the basics: For each major league team, 81 games must be on the road and 81 at home, with 13 home weekend series and 19 games against divisional opponents. With any wiggle room left, a team such as the Orioles might ask for a home game on Father's Day or an away game when a concert is scheduled at nearby M&T Bank Stadium. But any special request from one team can lead to a lot of eraser smudges for the rest.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | September 21, 1994
Ten years ago, schools were introducing students to computers."Now, the kids are ahead of the schools," said Forrest Hudspeth, a Woodbine parent who teaches computer programming at Bell Atlantic Corp.To try to turn things around again, the Carroll County school system is beginning a plan to update the computer systems in all 32 school buildings, starting with North Carroll High School."We're going from a two-lane country road to a California six-lane superhighway," said Mr. Hudspeth, who serves on a committee of parents, teachers and business people trying to develop a technology plan for county schools.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 11, 2000
Carol Sholes, director of information systems for Syracuse Newspapers, has been named to head the department that maintains computer technology and software systems at the Baltimore Sun Co. Sholes will take over as vice president of information technology by Jan. 2. She will replace Phil Rugile, who resigned July 28. Sun General Manager John Patinella said Sholes will be in charge of all the computer systems that make the newspaper work, and will take...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 6, 1998
The Baltimore school board will spend $24 million to buy two computer systems -- one to keep track of students and their records and a second to manage budget and financial data.For years, the city school system has been unable to track its students accurately, despite a 1988 order by a federal judge requiring the system to find a computer system that would detail the progress of special education students.The new system, which will be paid for over four years with state funds, is expected to help accurately track attendance, enrollment and other key data as well as hold the academic records of each child in the system, according to Roger Reese Jr., the school system's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
General Dynamics Corp. and its subcontractors expect to hire as many as 110 workers in Baltimore County who will work on computer systems for a new government program that will help retirees receive health care coverage, officials said Thursday. The defense contractor said Thursday that its information technology division won an $80 million award to work on the Department of Health and Human Services' Early Retiree Reinsurance Program. The program is part of the health care reform package that was passed this year and is intended to help retirees who are not yet eligible for Medicare obtain affordable insurance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
William E. Regan Jr., founder and former president of Data Networks Inc., a Baltimore-based company that specializes in providing computer systems to schools, and local and state governments, died Thursday in his sleep at his home in Berlin. The former Timonium resident was 67. Dr. Regan was born in Baltimore into an Irish-German family and was raised in Irvington. He was a 1958 graduate of Loyola High School, where he had been a champion basketball player. After earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Delaware in 1962, he went to work as a sales representative for Texas Instruments, selling integrated circuitry that led to the development of the modern computer, family members said.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Liz Bowie and JoAnna Daemmrich and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
For a school district unable to keep track of its students or buy basic supplies without reams of paperwork, the deal from a local computer company sounded too good to refuse. Give us $5.2 million and 18 months, Information Control Systems told Baltimore school officials, and we will deliver what you need: reliable computer systems. Eight months later, the ICS consultants wanted an additional $1.5 million for more work. They got it. Two months after that, the consultants brought in a new bill for $750,000.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Attorneys for Pfc. Bradley Manning opened their defense of the Army analyst Monday by portraying him as a computer whiz operating under loose guidelines whose decision to leak reams of classified documents was based on a well-intentioned sense of idealism. As Manning's court-martial at Fort Meade entered its sixth week, his defense team also filed a series of motions asking the military judge to dismiss the most serious charges against him — including that he aided the enemy by providing diplomatic cables, war logs and combat videos to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The State Archives had inadequate procedures to prevent loss or employee theft of its $31.4 million art collection, and outdated software left its computers vulnerable to attack, an audit released Tuesday found. The Department of Legislative Services audit did not find evidence that computers had been hacked or art lost or stolen, but recommended the State Archives improve its oversight. State Archives officials agreed with the auditors' findings and said they have put into place the recommendations or will soon do so. The State Archives, with a $8.7 million annual budget, keep historically significant documents and art, as well as certain government and private records.
NEWS
By Robert Koulish and Mark Noferi | February 20, 2013
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security now incarcerates, via immigration detention, more people per year than any other state or federal agency. In 2012, the DHS detained over 429,000 noncitizens awaiting immigration hearings or deportation, at a $2 billion cost to taxpayers. Yet the DHS' new risk assessment technology, which comprehensively and individually assesses immigrant detainees and collects valuable data, makes it possible for Congress to improve detention practices while reforming broader U.S. immigration laws.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After the Mount Vernon United Methodist Church was ravaged by a lightning-strike fire four years ago, the Hampden neighborhood was left with what appeared to be an unusable building. But Mark Dent saw more than a burned-out shell of an old stone church. He saw the future home of Chesapeake Systems, the 25-person computer company he co-owns. Still, the rebirth of the burned out church as a commercial building almost didn't happen. Dent's company spent months — and thousands of dollars — trying to work through the city's antiquated zoning law. As the process dragged on, he thought seriously about moving out of Baltimore, to an office park off Interstate 95. The city hopes to avoid such near-misses with a far-reaching piece of legislation, "Transform Baltimore," that would replace the city's decades-old zoning law. The new law is designed to be more understandable, speed up the zoning process, and discourage ad hoc zoning layers that are being used to sidestep outmoded rules.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Drivers across Maryland had trouble renewing their licenses Monday and Tuesday because of a computer glitch at the Motor Vehicle Administration. Technicians updating the system last weekend to reflect changes in state laws that take effect Oct. 1 noticed that "something didn't quite click" on Monday morning when offices opened for business, said MVA spokeswoman Caryn Coyle. Computer systems at some of the 24 branches that reported "sporadic problems" were taken off line and rebooted, she said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
General Dynamics Corp. and its subcontractors expect to hire as many as 110 workers in Baltimore County who will work on computer systems for a new government program that will help retirees receive health care coverage, officials said Thursday. The defense contractor said Thursday that its information technology division won an $80 million award to work on the Department of Health and Human Services' Early Retiree Reinsurance Program. The program is part of the health care reform package that was passed this year and is intended to help retirees who are not yet eligible for Medicare obtain affordable insurance.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
Avi Rubin is known for annoying large companies and important people. Two years ago, the Johns Hopkins University professor first alerted the country to troubling vulnerabilities in electronic voting, much to the consternation of election officials and machine-maker Diebold Election Systems. Then earlier this year, Texas Instruments similarly was none too pleased when Rubin's team of what he calls "super geniuses" broke the encryption on its wireless gas payment cards and car keys - a potential threat to millions of consumers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
In an article in Tuesday's editions of The Sun, the title for Intersolv executive Harold Daniels was reported incorrectly. Mr. Daniels is group vice president for enterprise client/server solutions.The Sun regrets the errors.Several years ago, Harold Daniels and his computer software wizards looked at the calendar and saw a huge problem was on the way for businesses the world over when the seemingly simple shift into the next millennium occurs on Jan. 1, 2000.Of course, as any wise business operator knows, trouble breeds opportunity.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
MP3Car.com used to be the right name for the Baltimore company. Not anymore. The company traces its roots to a worldwide online community of geeks in the 1990s who installed personal computers filled with electronic music files, or MP3s, in their cars. But, like many startup companies that surprisingly grew their business in a different direction, MP3Car.com is now struggling to choose a new name that signals what it does well: build sophisticated mobile computers for corporate and government clients.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Maryland Secretary of Human Resources Brenda Donald told lawmakers yesterday that her agency is doing a better job of using a new computer program to keep track of children in state care. At a General Assembly Joint Audit Committee meeting, Donald said that a recent audit documenting problems with "Chessie" - the Children's Electronic Social Services Information Exchange - "really is old news." Social services employees have entered data from 90 percent of foster care and abuse and neglect investigations, Donald said.
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