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BUSINESS
October 21, 1998
Three Baltimore-area nonprofits have received a three-year, $692,000 federal grant to provide computer training and jobs to persons with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities.The new program, called the Techworks Partnership, will provide training to 55 to 75 people who have a mental or related disability and who live in Baltimore's empowerment zone, said Stephen H. Morgan, executive director of the Baltimore Association for Retarded Citizens (BARC).The other two nonprofits are Learning Independence Through Computers (LINC)
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
Box of Rain Volunteers are needed to act as mentors for the Box of Rain organization's Big Sailor/Little Sailor Program and to serve as sailing instructors. Donations of funds and safety boats for sailing classes, boats, boating equipment — especially life preservers and gear — are also needed. Information: 443-254-0024. Commission for Women The Anne Arundel County Commission for Women seeks volunteers to help address issues important to women and families in the county.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1996
Futurekids has formed an educational partnership with Pointers Run Elementary School in Clarksville to help students and teachers with their computer skills.The company will install programs on the school's computers and conduct workshops to show teachers how to use them.Futurekids will provide lessons for students on how to improve their computer proficiency.The partnership was signed April 29.Pub Date: 5/06/96
NEWS
June 17, 2013
I imagine more than a couple of college presidents were reaching for the antacid last week when they read that Edward Snowden, with a GED and a few community college classes, was making a reported $122,000 a year. Why go to college when corporations are handing out these kinds of money? Kids, get cracking, sharpen those computer skills and the sky's the limit. There certainly don't seem to be any limits anymore on what kind of spying the U.S. government and its hirelings can do. Mark Plogman, Pikesville
NEWS
June 17, 2013
I imagine more than a couple of college presidents were reaching for the antacid last week when they read that Edward Snowden, with a GED and a few community college classes, was making a reported $122,000 a year. Why go to college when corporations are handing out these kinds of money? Kids, get cracking, sharpen those computer skills and the sky's the limit. There certainly don't seem to be any limits anymore on what kind of spying the U.S. government and its hirelings can do. Mark Plogman, Pikesville
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1996
Carmen Whittaker needed to update her computer skills. Pat Sikorski was familiar with keyboarding, but needed to develop HTC computer skills.And both women needed jobs.Ms. Whittaker and Ms. Sikorski were prime candidates for a new course offered by Catonsville Community College's Occupational Training Center. Computer Applications for Business, a noncredit course, provides nine weeks of intensive computer training for displaced workers -- aimed at improving their marketability in the work force.
NEWS
November 19, 2000
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: The Dyslexia Tutoring Program, 711 W. 40th St., Suite 310, Baltimore, a nonprofit organization, which is offering training for those interested in becoming volunteer tutors to work with people who have language learning disabilities. Training sessions will begin tomorrow. Contact: Marcie Schein, educator coordinator, 410- 889-5487. Baltimore County Delta Community Outreach Center, 8503 Glen Michael Lane, Suite 103, Randallstown, for an after-school program for ages 6 and older, working on reading, homework, computer skills and projects.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
Even a majority-Republican County Council determined to forge a reputation for fiscal prudence might find it hard to stand up to pressure to fund a computer network for students this year. But the Anne Arundel council, which rightly has been wary of the school board's ambitious Advanced School Automation Project, known as ASAP, needs to stand firm.Council members need a lot more information from school officials before they commit tens of millions of dollars to a network linking all county school computer labs.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
The volunteer organizer of a weekend basketball and computer camp for children in Baltimore has been charged with second-degree rape in the assault of a 12-year-old girl, according to court documents.Kermit Oneal Carter, 34, owner of People Production, an advertising and public relations firm, is accused in court documents of raping the girl in May at his home.According to court documents, the girl told police that she was walking to school on North Avenue in East Baltimore when a man lured her into his van with the offer of a ride and then took her to his home and assaulted her.The girl identified Carter from a photo lineup, police said.
NEWS
August 14, 1991
Recently, the term "PC" has come to be associated with debates about "political correctness" on the nation's campuses. But the more enduring association of the term will be the one that has become ubiquitous in the past decade -- personal computer.It was only 10 years ago that IBM unveiled its personal computer. It was not the first such machine, nor was its technology revolutionary. But because of IBM's dominant position in the computer industry, its PC established a benchmark by which to judge machines from dozens of smaller, competing companies.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Some people like Lori Hite of Ellicott City are still venturing back into the work force after being away for a decade, despite an economic tailspin that has vaulted the nation's unemployment rate to its current 9.5 percent. Hite, a Howard Community College student, is aware that most professions are ever-changing in what they demand from workers and is concerned about where she fits among those who have been out looking for work almost as long as she's been away. So she turned to resources at her school to get back on track.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
Eleven colleges and universities around Maryland will receive $865,000 in grants to help fill jobs created by the military base realignment and closure, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown announced Tuesday. The grants, ranging from $44,000 to $93,000, will help the institutions create training programs in the high-tech skills required for communications and intelligence jobs at Maryland's expanding military bases. "It is only through our partnerships that Maryland will reap every benefit of BRAC," Brown said in a statement announcing the grants.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | July 28, 2009
Mary Wolf was jogging around her adopted hometown of Annapolis when she turned a corner and discovered Clay Street, a community long blighted by poverty and crime, just steps from the State House and downtown Annapolis' restaurants and tourist attractions. The former television producer, who had run a successful computer literacy center in Washington, saw a need and wanted to open a center there in Annapolis. She didn't get much of a response. "People said, 'This will never work. Things never last on Clay Street.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
Computer training workshops at HCC Harford Community College is offering its Computer Training for Re-entry Women series to help women who are re-entering the work force, need to gain or improve computer skills, or want to advance or change their career. Workshops include: *Starting Over: Women will identify strengths and map out strategies to achieve personal and professional goals. *Computer Training for Re-entry Women: Women will learn how to use new computer skills. *Excel for Re-entry Women: Women learn how to create and use spreadsheets.
BUSINESS
By WALTER S. MOSSBERG and WALTER S. MOSSBERG,The Wall Street Journal | July 3, 2008
The parade of iPhone lookalikes continues. Soon after Apple announced the first iPhone a year ago, factories in Asia, at the behest of U.S. phone carriers, were asked to respond to the sleek, touch-screen device. Some have reached the United States; more are coming. The latest is the Samsung Instinct, introduced by Sprint on June 20. While it isn't a bad phone and has features the Apple product lacks, it is no match for the iPhone. The manufacturers have not replicated the iPhone's greatest strength: beautiful, powerful, breakthrough software.
BUSINESS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Daniel McGee's parents were apprehensive when their son turned his back on the college degree they assumed he would earn. A bachelor's degree was the key to success in the modern economy, and their son was on track to earn one, with athletic honors, a 3.0 grade point average at his Minnesota high school and scholarships in hand. But as McGee saw it, his future lay in the old-world industry of metalworking. And to succeed, he would have to do something that would shock many parents: turn down the scholarships and study machine-tool technology at a two-year technical college.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
The state is organizing a campaign of 5,000 volunteers to wire 700 Maryland schools to the Internet on the weekend of Sept. 27, as part of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's five-year plan to spend $53 million on computer systems at the state's 1,262 public school systems.The plan calls for connecting at least five classrooms and one other room -- such as a media center or library -- in each school to the Net, said Major F. Riddick Jr., the governor's chief of staff.In addition, state officials hope to arrange donations of at least two computers to each school that does not have at least that many available to students.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
Computer training workshops at HCC Harford Community College is offering its Computer Training for Re-entry Women series to help women who are re-entering the work force, need to gain or improve computer skills, or want to advance or change their career. Workshops include: *Starting Over: Women will identify strengths and map out strategies to achieve personal and professional goals. *Computer Training for Re-entry Women: Women will learn how to use new computer skills. *Excel for Re-entry Women: Women learn how to create and use spreadsheets.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Carroll's labor force earned high marks for basic skills but was found deficient in the written communication and technology skills today's employers seek, according to the results of a county-commissioned survey. Computer literacy and employee training were the top concerns of the 128 companies that responded to the survey, which was presented yesterday to the county's Economic Development Commission. Several commission members said the study, which cost the county $6,500, shows the county's schools and colleges should offer courses to meet the technology demands of the business community.
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