Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComputer Screen
IN THE NEWS

Computer Screen

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
It's hard to believe that computer users will put up $30 or $40 for a program that does absolutely nothing, but After Dark, from Berkeley Systems, does nothing with such elan that the price seems almost a pittance.After Dark is a screen blanker, or more accurately a screen saver. It takes over when your PC is idle for more than a few minutes, replacing whatever appears on your monitor with a dazzling aquarium, a screenful of flying toasters, or one of dozens of other animated images.When you press a key or use your mouse, it restores your !
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25). This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent. Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start - with himself as the Great Moderator - isn't working out as he thought.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
The Churchville Lions presented a computer, complete with JAWS software, to Tatyanna Ditzenberger. JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is a computer screen reader program for Microsoft Windows that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen with a text-to-speech output. Tatyanna and her teacher, Karen Karnes, demonstrate its use by making "Thank You Lions" appear on the screen.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2013
The Churchville Lions presented a computer, complete with JAWS software, to Tatyanna Ditzenberger. JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is a computer screen reader program for Microsoft Windows that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen with a text-to-speech output. Tatyanna and her teacher, Karen Karnes, demonstrate its use by making "Thank You Lions" appear on the screen.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Bojorquez and Jennifer Bojorquez,McClatchy News Service | October 1, 1993
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Until now, decorating your computer meant taping family photos or attaching magnetic gadgets to the side of the monitor. Some people, like Rosie Grazre, a California state government typist, decorate their monitors with personal memorabilia.To "perk up" her computer, Ms. Grazre has taped or attached the following to the side of her monitor: Seven pictures of her two children, five Mickey Mouse magnets, menus from three nearby restaurants and one picture of her husband.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | February 22, 2006
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's recent firing of a New York City employee after he spied a game of solitaire on the man's computer screen was a high-profile reminder of the risks workers face when they mix work and play. Still, prohibiting online games or other personal computer activity during working hours is rare among companies, some experts said. "Those companies are still in the minority," said employment lawyer Robert Lipman of Lipman & Plesur in Jericho, N.Y. He said most of his firm's corporate clients permit employees to shop online or play games once in a while.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Looking for the public's help identifying two individuals who robbed and assaulted a convenience store cashier at gunpoint in Laurel on Friday, Prince George's County police released Wednesday a gripping surveillance tape of the encounter. (Scroll down to view the video, or click here .) The video begins about 1:07 a.m., just before a masked suspect becomes visible in the store in the 15000 block of Sweitzer Lane, suddenly leaps onto the cashier's counter and squeezes through a small window to gain access to the cashier's booth.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Just when we thought we'd seen enough of "Pokemon" on the big screen, here comes a cinematic version of a similar Japanese cartoon, "Digimon: Digital Monsters." Here's some advice for parents whose kids are big fans of the popular Fox Kids Network cartoon: Stay away from this movie - if your offspring will allow it, that is. "Digimon: The Movie" logs the violent travails of a group of Japanese children who each have Digimons - sort of a cross between a pet and an invisible friend, except they often go from smiley furballs to horned creatures in nanoseconds so they can plunge large swords into the enemy's chest.
FEATURES
By John M. Moran and John M. Moran,Hartford Courant | August 14, 1995
Garry Trudeau, award-winning "Doonesbury" cartoonist, is getting animated.Some of his most famous "Doonesbury" characters -- Zonker Harris, J. J., Duke, B. D. and more -- are represented in a new collection of computer screen savers dubbed "Doonesbury Toonscapes."Mr. Trudeau is not apologizing for selling out. In fact, he is trumpeting it. That is because the royalties from the screen savers and other "Doonesbury" products are donated to several of his favorite charities.Screen savers are software programs designed to take over the computer screen when it is unattended.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Keay Davidson and Keay Davidson,San Francisco Examiner | June 5, 2000
Internet moneybags and Silicon Valley kingpins may be concerned about the recent tumult on the stock market, but cat-lovers may have another worry: how to keep kitty off the computer keyboard. A software designer says he has a solution, a program that is designed to detect when a cat is walking on the keyboard. The software, called PawSense, automatically ignores anything the cat types. The software also instructs the computer to emit scary, cat-repelling sounds -- for example, the sound of a harmonica.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 31, 2012
Dennis Pitta keeps getting friend requests on Facebook from hot-looking women, which is all very flattering, although it probably doesn't go over real well with his wife. The only problem is, he's not THAT Dennis Pitta. Not even close. "After I tell them I'm over 60, 5-feet-6 and 180 pounds, I never hear from them again," he says with a laugh. "They don't even bother to write back and say 'I'm sorry!'" That's because this Dennis Pitta is the genial, long-time marketing professor at the University of Baltimore and not the Dennis Pitta who's built along the lines of a stand-up freezer and plays tight end for the Ravens.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Looking for the public's help identifying two individuals who robbed and assaulted a convenience store cashier at gunpoint in Laurel on Friday, Prince George's County police released Wednesday a gripping surveillance tape of the encounter. (Scroll down to view the video, or click here .) The video begins about 1:07 a.m., just before a masked suspect becomes visible in the store in the 15000 block of Sweitzer Lane, suddenly leaps onto the cashier's counter and squeezes through a small window to gain access to the cashier's booth.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
Ellie Kavanagh had never been so happy to sleep through her alarm. The Virginia Tech junior had planned to go for a morning workout at the campus gym on Thursday. But instead, she was in her apartment a few miles away when her computer screen went black and the public safety message popped up. Shots had been fired on campus. A gunman was on the loose. Kavanagh, a Stoneleigh resident, was still in high school on April 16, 2007, when Virginia Tech student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and himself in the deadliest campus shooting spree in American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
It doesn't look much like coins, this misshapen hunk of stone-encrusted metal. But peer closer, and the coral-like formation turns out to be several dozen 19th-century half-dollars, clinging together like barnacles on a rock. Sure, it's ugly. That's what spending more than a century at the bottom of the ocean can do to a coin. This numismatic mutation is but one of the many wonders on display as part of "Shipwreck! Pirates & Treasure," a traveling exhibition opening Friday at the Maryland Science Center . Part pirate fantasy, part high-tech odyssey, the exhibit is devoted to treasure, highlighting both the scurvy scalawags who plundered it and the modern adventurers who spend years scouring the ocean floor trying to recover it. The result is a happily schizophrenic exhibit that starts off talking about pirates, Jolly Rogers and unfortunate people walking the plank.
NEWS
By Susan Thornton Hobby and Susan Thornton Hobby,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2006
Wearing a headset and facing a computer screen, Dale Olsen is interviewing Rashid Abdullah in what appears to be a video conference. Abdullah is responding, but his eyes are narrowing, his mouth is hardening and his answers are growing more clipped. The interviewer covers his mouthpiece. "Now I'm going to offend him," Olsen says, as he chooses a prompt from a dozen displayed on the screen: "Your wife is very attractive," he says. "Where did you meet her?" Abdullah erupts in a rage: "Where did you meet my wife?"
NEWS
July 11, 2006
The Inuit have no shortage of words to describe snow and ice and whether the stuff is falling, floating or just lying around. Living near the Arctic Circle is bound to do that to a culture. But what about a people trapped in an equally hostile (if somewhat warmer) environment of personal computers, cell phones, big-box stores, avian flu, pop psychology and mass media? The effects on their vocabulary are bound to be revealing. That brings us to the nearly 100 words the folks at Merriam-Webster have decided to add for this year's update of the company's widely circulated Collegiate Dictionary.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25). This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent. Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start - with himself as the Great Moderator - isn't working out as he thought.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2006
Brooke Bell is a celebrity. The fourth-grader, who has thick, waist-length hair and a smile that lights up her face, is the only student in Maryland to win a Yes I Can award from the Council for Exceptional Children. Brooke was one of 27 winners chosen from more than 300 applications worldwide, and one of two winners out of 22 applicants in the technology category. "I already know Brooke is special," said her mother, Stacy Bell of Severn. "It just kind of shows how special she really is."
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2006
Brooke Bell is a celebrity. The fourth-grader, who has thick, waist-length hair and a smile that lights up her face, is the only student in Maryland to win a Yes I Can award from the Council for Exceptional Children. Brooke was one of 27 winners chosen from more than 300 applications worldwide, and one of two winners out of 22 applicants in the technology category. "I already know Brooke is special," said her mother, Stacy Bell of Severn. "It just kind of shows how special she really is."
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | February 22, 2006
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's recent firing of a New York City employee after he spied a game of solitaire on the man's computer screen was a high-profile reminder of the risks workers face when they mix work and play. Still, prohibiting online games or other personal computer activity during working hours is rare among companies, some experts said. "Those companies are still in the minority," said employment lawyer Robert Lipman of Lipman & Plesur in Jericho, N.Y. He said most of his firm's corporate clients permit employees to shop online or play games once in a while.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.