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NEWS
By John Markoff and John Markoff,New York Times News Service | March 3, 1992
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- A Silicon Valley company has hired the Russian scientist who created the supercomputers used by the Soviet space program and the military to design nuclear weapons.The contract is one of the first examples of a U.S. business tapping the wealth of scientific talent that until recently was dedicated to the former Soviet Union's vast military program.Russian scientist Boris A. Babayan will set up a laboratory in Moscow for Sun Microsystems Inc. that will employ his team of about 50 software and hardware designers.
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NEWS
By James M. Purtilo | July 17, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleycorrectly flags STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - as critical economic enablers, and an administrative priority. Thus, it was good news when Towson University recently won a $2 million grant to study science instruction. They'll find better ways to teach traditional sciences, just asUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County leads the nation with teaching mathematics. Unfortunately, the future is not bright for one key STEM area: computer science.
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NEWS
By James M. Purtilo | July 17, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleycorrectly flags STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - as critical economic enablers, and an administrative priority. Thus, it was good news when Towson University recently won a $2 million grant to study science instruction. They'll find better ways to teach traditional sciences, just asUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County leads the nation with teaching mathematics. Unfortunately, the future is not bright for one key STEM area: computer science.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 12, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO -- From the billions of documents that form the World Wide Web and the links that weave them together, computer scientists and a growing collection of startup companies are finding new ways to mine human intelligence. Their goal is to add a layer of meaning on top of the existing Web that would make it less of a catalog and more of a guide - and even provide the foundation for systems that can reason in a human fashion. That level of artificial intelligence, with machines doing the thinking instead of simply following commands, has eluded researchers for more than half a century.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 30, 1992
In a few years, when you curse at your computer, don't be surprised if it tries to obey your command.After decades of work, computer scientists are coming closer to realizing one of the discipline's most sought-after goals: creating computers that respond to natural human speech.There are already a few products that let computers "understand" the spoken word. Most of them understand only one or two people who have taken time to "train" the system to understand their style of speech. But more advanced systems, ones that can understand anyone speaking to them without specific training, appear on the verge of moving from laboratory to market.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 3, 1992
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- A Silicon Valley company has hired the Russian scientist who created the supercomputers used by the Soviet space program and by its military to design nuclear weapons.The contract is one of the first examples of an American business tapping the wealth of scientific talent that until recently was dedicated to the Soviet Union's vast military program.Russian scientist Boris A. Babayan will set up a laboratory in Moscow for Sun Microsystems Inc. that will employ his team of about 50 software and hardware designers.
NEWS
By DIANA K. SUGG and DIANA K. SUGG,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
Venturing millimeter by millimeter, computer scientists and physicians are probing the human brain in startling new ways that rely on software instead of scalpels. They're dissecting it mathematically.Researchers at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute are part of an effort to expand how computers can measure brain structures -- and uncover how differences reveal disease and shape human behavior.What they're finding helped solve the puzzle of identical twins who turned out remarkably different.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2004
WHILE ELECTION officials, lawmakers and critics in Maryland and other states squabble over the reliability of electronic voting systems, a small group of computer scientists and engineers has been developing one that might actually work. The Open Voting Consortium is scheduled to demonstrate a prototype today in San Jose, Calif. You can try a version yourself on the Web at www.open votingconsortium.org. Although it's far from a finished product, the system retains what's good about current electronic voting systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | October 25, 1999
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Take a deep breath and repeat after me: It's only a machine ... it's only a machine ... it's only a machine.There's no question we have strong feelings about the computers in our lives. In a British study, three-quarters of PC users acknowledged they cuss at their computers now and again. One-quarter confessed to kicking their machines. Sound familiar?People tend to treat their computers as though they were human, "even if you are a computer science student and know it's a machine," said Rosalind Picard, an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab who studies the complex emotional ties between people and their PCs.But the relationship is decidedly one-sided.
NEWS
By PAUL W. BOLTZ | September 6, 1993
The essential point to grasp is that in dealing with capitalism we are dealing with an evolutionary process. --Joseph A. Schumpeter, ''Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy.'' Payroll employment in the United States has climbed by well over 1 million so far this year, and yet scarcely a day passes without a news report of vast layoffs at some company or other. We are barraged with reports of defense-industry layoffs, cutbacks at giant computer firms, staff reductions at major retailers; even layoffs at foreign firms like Daimler Benz now merit national news time.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
James Anderson Chamblee, a retired computer scientist who made two voyages across the Atlantic in a 45-foot ketch, died of heart failure Aug. 18 at Howard County General Hospital. The Columbia resident was 66. Mr. Chamblee was born and raised in Wilmington, N.C., and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the State University of New York at New Paltz. He began working for International Business Machines in 1959 and helped develop an electronic reservation system for American Airlines and automation of the New York Stock Exchange.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2004
WHILE ELECTION officials, lawmakers and critics in Maryland and other states squabble over the reliability of electronic voting systems, a small group of computer scientists and engineers has been developing one that might actually work. The Open Voting Consortium is scheduled to demonstrate a prototype today in San Jose, Calif. You can try a version yourself on the Web at www.open votingconsortium.org. Although it's far from a finished product, the system retains what's good about current electronic voting systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | February 19, 2004
AT FIRST GLANCE, computer scientists and plant researchers don't have much in common, but these days, they're both talking about the dangers of a monoculture. The term comes from the world of biology, where it refers a single species of vegetation that covers a large area. A pine forest is a monoculture; so is the "perfect" lawn, or a county planted with one type of cotton. When everything goes right, monocultures can be efficient. A farmer who grows only one crop has to buy one type of seed and fertilizer, one type of pesticide.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - First came the Internet in the late 1960s, electronically linking computers around the world. The '90s brought the World Wide Web, making it possible to exchange words, pictures, music, videos and information of every sort. Now comes the "Grid," a third wave in the evolution of the cyberworld that promises to give users access to unprecedented computing power, services and data, no matter where they are located. Ultimately, supporters say, the Grid will be like having a supercomputer at your fingertips.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
In neither appearance nor demeanor does Avi Rubin suggest the aura of a troublemaker. He is slight in stature, bespectacled, well-spoken and neat, if informal, in dress. In conversation, you detect confidence but not quite braggadocio. He does not seem to be a threat to democracy. Judging by the reaction to Rubin's most recent work, though, this 35-year-old Johns Hopkins computer scientist might as well be the reincarnation of Josef Stalin, so dangerous is he to the American electoral system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | October 25, 1999
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Take a deep breath and repeat after me: It's only a machine ... it's only a machine ... it's only a machine.There's no question we have strong feelings about the computers in our lives. In a British study, three-quarters of PC users acknowledged they cuss at their computers now and again. One-quarter confessed to kicking their machines. Sound familiar?People tend to treat their computers as though they were human, "even if you are a computer science student and know it's a machine," said Rosalind Picard, an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab who studies the complex emotional ties between people and their PCs.But the relationship is decidedly one-sided.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | February 19, 2004
AT FIRST GLANCE, computer scientists and plant researchers don't have much in common, but these days, they're both talking about the dangers of a monoculture. The term comes from the world of biology, where it refers a single species of vegetation that covers a large area. A pine forest is a monoculture; so is the "perfect" lawn, or a county planted with one type of cotton. When everything goes right, monocultures can be efficient. A farmer who grows only one crop has to buy one type of seed and fertilizer, one type of pesticide.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 12, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO -- From the billions of documents that form the World Wide Web and the links that weave them together, computer scientists and a growing collection of startup companies are finding new ways to mine human intelligence. Their goal is to add a layer of meaning on top of the existing Web that would make it less of a catalog and more of a guide - and even provide the foundation for systems that can reason in a human fashion. That level of artificial intelligence, with machines doing the thinking instead of simply following commands, has eluded researchers for more than half a century.
NEWS
By DIANA K. SUGG and DIANA K. SUGG,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
Venturing millimeter by millimeter, computer scientists and physicians are probing the human brain in startling new ways that rely on software instead of scalpels. They're dissecting it mathematically.Researchers at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute are part of an effort to expand how computers can measure brain structures -- and uncover how differences reveal disease and shape human behavior.What they're finding helped solve the puzzle of identical twins who turned out remarkably different.
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