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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
L. Kristan Presnell, an assistant professor of computer science at Anne Arundel Community College, has been named the 1995 Maryland Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.She was chosen from 15 nominees at 13 two- and four-year state colleges and universities. The Millersville resident also was among 546 faculty members nominated for U.S. Professors of the Year honors.Ms. Presnell had students in her Introduction to UNIX courses keep in-class journals that she used to track their progress and problems.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
He didn't even finish his degree at the University of Maryland, College Park, but entrepreneur Brendan Iribe found other creative geniuses and best friends as he tinkered in the computer science department there. So on Friday, he will give the university $31 million - the largest gift the university has ever received - to build a new computer science building with a focus on virtual reality. "It is transformational for our university and our college. What Brendan Iribe is doing is creating a center.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
When Michael Beynon was deciding where to pursue his doctorate in computer sciences, he went down the list in U.S News and World Report's annual rankings. He found the University of Maryland, College Park in the top 25 and decided to apply."I think it was in the mid-teens," he said of the 1994 numbers. "So those U.S. News rankings are important."In the latest rankings of graduate schools and programs, released last week, UMCP's computer science department is tied for 11th with the California Institute of Technology.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
The Baltimore area has an outsized share of job openings in fields that make heavy use of science, technology, engineering or math skills, occupations that pay more and are harder for employers to fill, according to a new analysis. The Brookings Institution study, to be released today, found that the Baltimore region had the eighth-highest percentage of job openings in "STEM" fields among large metro areas - on par with high-tech Seattle and Boston. In much of the country, Brookings said, STEM jobs remain posted on company websites for longer than other listings, suggesting that it takes more time to get enough qualified applicants.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 16, 2014
This article has been updated to reflect the correct field for visual arts professor Eric Smallwood.  Thirty years ago, U.S. colleges and universities awarded 37 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees to women. Today, when that number should be approaching 50 percent, it has actually been cut in half. Women in the United States now receive just 18 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees, and less than a quarter of professionals in computing are women. It's true that women in technology are increasingly well known.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
THERE'S MIXED news about the status of girls and women in science and math. Females have made significant progress during the past 20 years in medicine and the biological sciences. But the gender gap hasn't closed in technology and engineering, and in computer science it has widened. These are among the findings of a report issued yesterday by the National Council for Research on Women. Among the report's lowlights: In 1996, women constituted 45 percent of the work force in the United States but held only 12 percent of science and engineering jobs in business and industry - this at a time when U.S. firms couldn't fill technically advanced jobs.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
Steven A. McGinley was not the class clown in his South Carroll High School graduating class.But he's made up for lost time since then.After graduating in 1991, McGinley planned to become a computer scientist, but he couldn't resist the lure of greasepaint. He sought to bring new depth and meaning to familiar stage roles such as Hamlet, King Lear and Willy Loman.Instead, he got serious about professional clowning.The former Mount Airy resident, a 1996 graduate of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's Clown College, is again enrolled in a class full of clowns, mimes and theater students at the Jacques Lecoq School of Mime and Theater in Paris.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Towson University graduate student Marcus Gates could turn his political science degree into a teaching certificate in high school social studies. Instead, he's set his sights on elementary school."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 5, 2009
F rances Bowman of Perryville asks: "What kind of education does a meteorologist need?" It's no cakewalk. The National Weather Service wants a bachelor's degree in meteorology or atmospheric science. Course work must include thermodynamics, analysis and prediction, remote sensing, physics and calculus. Then choose three: hydrology, statistics, chemistry, oceanography, climatology, aeronomy or computer science.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
A team including a University of Maryland Baltimore County graduate student won the grand prize yesterday in an international competition to design more accurate voting machines. Judges at the VoComp University Voting Systems Competition in Portland, Ore., selected the four-person "Punchscan" team that included UMBC computer science graduate student Richard T. Carback III. One of four finalists, Punchscan designed, implemented and tested a complete voting system at a student election at the University of Ottawa, said Alan T. Sherman, a UMBC computer science professor who also works with the school's National Center for the Study of Elections.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 16, 2014
This article has been updated to reflect the correct field for visual arts professor Eric Smallwood.  Thirty years ago, U.S. colleges and universities awarded 37 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees to women. Today, when that number should be approaching 50 percent, it has actually been cut in half. Women in the United States now receive just 18 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees, and less than a quarter of professionals in computing are women. It's true that women in technology are increasingly well known.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2012
Katelyn Baird and Eric Ottaway Katelyn Baird, daughter of Julie Baird, of Ellicott City, and the late Curt Baird, wedded Eric Ottaway, son of Ricky Ottaway, of Oak Island, N.C., and Julie Brown, of Hampstead, N.C., on June 2, 2012. The Rev. Sidney Venable III officiated at the ceremony, which was held in the Montjoy Barn at the Howard County Conservancy. Honor attendants were Ricky Ottaway and Lisa Baird, sister of the bride. A reception was held at the Gudelsky Center, also at the conservancy.
NEWS
By James M. Purtilo | July 17, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleycorrectly flags STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - as critical economic enablers, and an administrative priority. Thus, it was good news when Towson University recently won a $2 million grant to study science instruction. They'll find better ways to teach traditional sciences, just asUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County leads the nation with teaching mathematics. Unfortunately, the future is not bright for one key STEM area: computer science.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Timothy Picciotti, a computer engineer who worked in defense systems and was active in Howard County youth athletics, died of cancer Dec. 27 at his Highland home. He was 46. Born in Akron, Ohio, he was the son of an electrical engineer and a homemaker. He earned a mathematics degree at Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio, and was hired by Westinghouse. He then came to Baltimore and worked in software systems engineering and technical management of airborne radar programs. He later earned two Bachelor of Science degrees, in mathematics and computer science, and a Master of Science degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2011
Like skilled cat burglars, teams of college-age hackers slithered past defenses to probe the soft underbelly of a sophisticated computer system. Their mission: to steal secrets and leave an electronic calling card. As they tapped away on laptops and spoke in low voices, knots of educators, business leaders, parents and government officials hovered nearby, smiling and nodding with approval. In the eyes of the organizers of the Maryland Cyber Challenge and Conference, today's hacker could be tomorrow's cybersecurity hero.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 19, 2011
At funeral services for Nathan Krasnopoler held at Sol Levinson and Bros. Funeral Home on Aug. 12, the 20-year-old was remembered by a Johns Hopkins University professor for his "keen and incisive intellect. " Mr. Krasnopoler died Aug. 10 at Gilchrist Center in Columbia from a severe irreversible brain injury that he sustained Feb. 20 after being hit by a motorist while riding his bicycle on West University Parkway near the Hopkins Homewood campus. "Nathan was very bright, very creative and very self-motivated," said Edward R. Scheinerman, professor in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, who is also vice dean of engineering education at the Whiting School of Engineering.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
The student: Svetlana Yarosh, 18 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Yarosh was one of 18 Howard County high school students named National Merit Scholarship semifinalists. School activities: She is a member of the National Honor Society and the Art Service. College plans: Yarosh will attend the University of Pennsylvania or Princeton University. She hopes to major in computer science or art.
NEWS
By James M. Purtilo | July 17, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleycorrectly flags STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - as critical economic enablers, and an administrative priority. Thus, it was good news when Towson University recently won a $2 million grant to study science instruction. They'll find better ways to teach traditional sciences, just asUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County leads the nation with teaching mathematics. Unfortunately, the future is not bright for one key STEM area: computer science.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2010
Carl Pettis was frustrated after he got his first test grade in Susan Slattery's college calculus class. "It was not good," he said. "She chewed me out for silly mistakes. " But Pettis credits Slattery's tough instruction at Alabama State University as a big factor in his rise to academic success. Slattery, who had moved onto a position as mathematics department chairwoman at Stevenson University, died in an Ohio car accident Monday. At Alabama State — where Pettis is now the interim chair for the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science — and at Stevenson, the academic community is mourning her loss.
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