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NEWS
May 22, 2000
Keep foreigners out of the port of Baltimore! Raise docking costs! Looking for a conspiracy theory? The National Park Service set the fire that nearly wiped out the Los Alamos nuclear bomb factory. Look no further. Bush is surging in the polls. Nixon used to call that peaking too early. Or piquing too early. There are now one billion Indians, most of whom are computer programmers.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A marquee name in the technology industry said Tuesday that it is buying Columbia-based Sourcefire - a homegrown player in the hot cybersecurity field - for $2.7 billion cash. Cisco Systems wants to bolster its security offerings with Sourcefire products, which protect the computers and networks of major businesses and government agencies. The Silicon Valley firm - eager to tap new talent and increase its footprint in the East Coast's major cyber hub - said Sourcefire's headquarters will remain in Columbia and it does not plan any job cuts.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 1991
Professional uniformsUniforms might be the newest style in office attire.While uniforms are traditional among those in law enforcement, the military and service industries, professional uniforms are uncommon.However, in some companies, uniforms are popular, practical and preferred by employees. "We look professional, and we feel good about ourselves," said Sharon Seymour, who works in the marketing department at Keesler Federal Credit Union in Biloxi, Miss., where employees have been uniformed since the early 1960s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
Geoffrey W. Moore, a former computer programmer and linguist, died Friday from complications of cystic fibrosis at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Lake-Walker resident was 36. Mr. Moore was born in Detroit and moved in 1976 with his family to the city's Lake-Walker neighborhood. He attended Loyola High School and graduated in 1996 from Towson Catholic High School. He attended the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. G. William Moore, a pathologist with the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, said his son had a talent for languages and was fluent in Japanese, German and Latin.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | September 6, 1993
If jobs, like clothes, drift in and out of vogue, then paralegals, computer programmers, occupational therapists, underwriters and travel agents have become some of Maryland's most fashionable vocations, according to census data.And general office clerks, machine operators, assemblers, hand packers, typists and most farmers are about as popular as mink stoles and polyester leisure suits.The tally of what's hot and not in how people make a living comes from a recently released Maryland Office of Planning report, the most detailed look yet at workplace changes from 1980 to 1990.
BUSINESS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | August 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Gene Nelson, a computer programmer, has been looking for work for two years. High-technology companies say they desperately need computer programmers. It would seem like a perfect fit.But Nelson has had only a few interviews and no job offers.A holder of a doctorate in biophysics who has been programming computers since the early 1970s, Nelson has sent out hundreds of resumes and attended dozens of job fairs. He has lowered his salary sights from $50,000 to $40,000. Now, he says the mid-$30,000 range would be fine.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | July 7, 2006
In 1981, Mark Hagerty experienced what he called "a minor disagreement with his boss" that left him jobless with a mortgage, a pregnant wife and no college degree. No one, he said, wanted to hire a Miami-based air traffic controller after President Reagan fired them all. However, they did want to hire computer programmers, and after taking odd jobs answering phones and doing construction Hagerty concluded that happiness required an office with air conditioning. He enrolled in college. Hagerty, who lives in Crofton, is now responsible for the cyber-security of more than 3.6 million current and former federal workers' retirement savings as chief information officer for the Thrift Savings Plan in Washington.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
They fly around the Beltway on tight schedules, working for two, three, even four employers in a week. They keep their files in their car trunks. They have low pay, few perks and no job security.They're also changing the face of higher education.They're part-time instructors, or "adjuncts," many of whom shuttle from campus to campus, trying to cobble a living.Several hundred adjuncts work in the Baltimore area, and their ranks are swelling here and nationally -- a trend that threatens traditional academic life and, some say, the quality of higher education.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 12, 1993
Job angst dominates barroom bellyachingIn vino veritas?If barroom conversations are any indication, we're obsessed with our jobs these days.Love, the Orioles, politics -- none of that seems important when we're whining into our wine."
FEATURES
By Vernon Silver and Vernon Silver,New York Times News Service | April 25, 1995
J. C. Herz was giving an on-line party for her new book when an Internet denizen named Digitalman demanded to know what made her cybertome so special."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 5, 2010
John Joseph "Jody" Ferguson, a longtime computer programmer and talented athlete who regularly ran marathons and enjoyed swimming, died Friday at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center from complications of a seizure suffered last month. The Parkville resident was 39. Mr. Ferguson had suffered a seizure Sept. 15 while swimming at North Arundel Aquatic Center and was unconscious when removed from the pool by lifeguards. He had been in a coma since that time, said his brother, Terence T. Ferguson of Boston.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Frederick Linwood Boone, a retired printer and senior computer programmer, died May 12 of renal failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 77. Mr. Boone, the son of a General Electric Corp. worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Abbotston Street. As a youth, he was an active member of Third Lutheran Church, where his father was scoutmaster of Troop 77 and where Mr. Boone attained Eagle Scout rank. He later served as scoutmaster of Troop 77. He was a 1950 graduate of City College and served in an Army infantry unit from 1956 to 1960.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 12, 2009
Judith C. Gehret, a computer programmer and faculty member at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whose work during her three-decade career produced valuable research assistance for both professors and graduate students, died of congestive heart failure Sept. 2 at her Sparks home. She was 76. Judith Colburn was born in Wilmington, Del., the daughter of Allan P. Colburn, a prominent chemical engineer who had served as acting president of the University of Delaware and was longtime chairman of its chemical engineering department.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,jennifer.mcmenamin@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
Leaning against a stool with his conductor's baton at the ready, Raffaele Faraco is leading his musicians through their first reading of a complicated Beethoven symphony. The 87-year-old former violinist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra interrupts the group repeatedly to offer suggestions. He jokes about his creaky bones and encourages them to "play music, not just the notes." And he pushes and prods his orchestra members - computer programmers, office secretaries, dietitians, court reporters and police dispatchers - to do better.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | July 7, 2006
In 1981, Mark Hagerty experienced what he called "a minor disagreement with his boss" that left him jobless with a mortgage, a pregnant wife and no college degree. No one, he said, wanted to hire a Miami-based air traffic controller after President Reagan fired them all. However, they did want to hire computer programmers, and after taking odd jobs answering phones and doing construction Hagerty concluded that happiness required an office with air conditioning. He enrolled in college. Hagerty, who lives in Crofton, is now responsible for the cyber-security of more than 3.6 million current and former federal workers' retirement savings as chief information officer for the Thrift Savings Plan in Washington.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2006
Srikanth Devarajan arrived in this country with "only two boxes and my wife" -- plus a brain bursting with computer code and anticipation. His papers said he was here to do IT for Target, but he also expected more glamorous pursuits. "Niagara Falls, Vegas, Disney World," says a song he would eventually release. "Can't wait to go to New York City." Of course, he'd never fantasized much about Minneapolis, where the jet that bore him on the last leg of the journey from southern India finally landed.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A marquee name in the technology industry said Tuesday that it is buying Columbia-based Sourcefire - a homegrown player in the hot cybersecurity field - for $2.7 billion cash. Cisco Systems wants to bolster its security offerings with Sourcefire products, which protect the computers and networks of major businesses and government agencies. The Silicon Valley firm - eager to tap new talent and increase its footprint in the East Coast's major cyber hub - said Sourcefire's headquarters will remain in Columbia and it does not plan any job cuts.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,jennifer.mcmenamin@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
Leaning against a stool with his conductor's baton at the ready, Raffaele Faraco is leading his musicians through their first reading of a complicated Beethoven symphony. The 87-year-old former violinist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra interrupts the group repeatedly to offer suggestions. He jokes about his creaky bones and encourages them to "play music, not just the notes." And he pushes and prods his orchestra members - computer programmers, office secretaries, dietitians, court reporters and police dispatchers - to do better.
NEWS
February 26, 2005
Michael H. Higgins Jr., a retired computer programmer and rail and streetcar buff, died of heart failure Feb. 16 at a hospital in Carlisle, Pa. The former Northeast Baltimore resident was 65. Mr. Higgins was born in Baltimore and raised on Kirk Avenue. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, he served in the Air Force in the late 1950s and 1960s. He earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Baltimore in 1972, and a year later began working for the state government as a computer programmer.
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