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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
The same computerized language course that prepares CIA operatives to go undercover in non-English speaking countries could change the way children learn foreign languages in Harford County schools.The county's school system is the first to get a peek at the technology as 37 secondary and elementary school children "test" the computer program this summer for Analysas Corp., a Washington company.Swanson Middle School in Arlington, Va., is the only other school that plans to test the program.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
Larry Piper couldn't find a "cash register" computer program that suited him.So three years ago, the owner of Basically Computers in Westminster started to write his own.Now the program is being carried by 450 computer dealers nationwide and has been recognized as a "problem solver" by Microsoft and Small Business Technologies. Both national computer companies are referring clients seeking cash register programs to the Carroll corporation."None of them met my needs very well," said Larry Piper of other cash register programs he tried for his 11-year-old computer business and his family's retail liquor outlet in Manchester.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The speed camera company blasted in Baltimore for issuing tickets to people who weren't speeding is now facing criticism in Howard County, where it submitted a year's worth of inaccurate data about the program there. Data submitted by Xerox State & Local Solutions for the county's four cameras repeatedly listed more vehicles speeding than there were cars on the road, according to documents reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The 2013 data sometimes reported that 200 percent, 400 percent or even 600 percent of the number of cars that passed by a camera were speeding.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1997
When thousands of pint-sized ghouls and goblins go scampering through the streets on their trick-or-treat routes tomorrow night, Howard County police will be using a high-tech computer program to keep their Halloween more safe than scary.Throughout the county, police officers will be carrying detailed maps showing them exactly where the types of crimes typical for Halloween have occurred in the past."We know we're going to have a higher number of reports of vandalism tomorrow because it happens every year on Halloween," said George Koch, an analyst with the Howard Police Department's crime analysis unit.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Michael Dresser and David Nitkin and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2002
REPUBLICAN lawmakers were furious. Each Democratic member of the General Assembly, along with staff, had been invited to a union headquarters in Annapolis for a training session. On the agenda: learning how to use a powerful computer program to target voters in this year's election. The session was held last week in a conference room of the Maryland State Teachers Association, one of the largest and most active labor groups in the state, and one that is a reliable ally of the Democratic Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | January 31, 2000
Suppose you bought a computer program that crashed and trashed your system -- and the only place you could sue for damages was in Ireland. Suppose a software giant sued you because you posted unkind comments on the Internet about a program that didn't work. Or suppose the family photos you posted on the Web turned up in a big company's advertising campaign -- and you learned the company had the right to your image simply because you used one of its programs to edit the photos. You already may have agreed to terms like these when you broke the plastic seal on a software package or clicked an "I accept" button on a program you downloaded from the Internet.
NEWS
December 27, 2000
The student: Christina Bonebreak, 17 School: River Hill High School Achievement: Christina placed second in the Space Technology category at the NASA/GSFC (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center) Virtual Science Fair. Her project, a computer program that plots stars, has received several other awards, including first place for best use of computer science and best use of mathematics from the National Security Agency at the Baltimore Science Fair at Towson University.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Maryland Secretary of Human Resources Brenda Donald told lawmakers yesterday that her agency is doing a better job of using a new computer program to keep track of children in state care. At a General Assembly Joint Audit Committee meeting, Donald said that a recent audit documenting problems with "Chessie" - the Children's Electronic Social Services Information Exchange - "really is old news." Social services employees have entered data from 90 percent of foster care and abuse and neglect investigations, Donald said.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | October 18, 2000
Food safety survey Although the vast majority of Americans say they are concerned about food safety, a recent survey by Tyson Foods found many people barely understand the basics of how to prepare foods safely. Only about half of those questioned use meat thermometers, and 35 percent didn't know that wooden cutting boards should not be used for cutting meat and poultry. Handy advice on wine Even if you don't know Chablis from chardonnay, you can choose the right wine for your dinner party using Pocket Vineyard, a computer program for Palm OS hand-held computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexa Cottman-Robinson and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
When you think of rock music you probably don't think about "Super Mario Bros. " or "Space Invaders. " But a subculture of video game rock bands? Yes, it's a thing. And now that you know the bands exist, you're likely all too eager to start your own video game rock band. For your sake, we got to chat with John DeCampos a member of [Explosion Sound] (yes it's in brackets), a Baltimore-based video game rock band performing at this year's Bit Gen Gamer Fest, which holds its ninth gathering Saturday at Rams Head Live (for more information, go to bitgen.magfest.org .)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
HopHacks - a 36-hour, sleepless, caffeine-fueled, mad-rush of computer programming - came to an end Sunday with bleary-eyed Johns Hopkins University students unveiling their (mostly) finished inventions ... and then crashing. The creations, computer programs developed using publicly available code, ranged from the high-minded (an app to help connect the homeless to nearby shelters) to the college-minded (an app to find new happy hour deals). There was a database to make DNA sequences easier for geneticists to search; an organizer for those never-read links and news articles emailed by parents; and a Pandora-esque program that generated playlists based on favorite bands.
HEALTH
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Uninsured, low-income Maryland residents may soon be able to use a Web-based computer program to find out which health programs they are eligible for and apply to them all at once, under a state program being tried out by Howard County health officials. Howard used a state grant to buy the half-million-dollar software about two years ago, but has now modified it to both instantly determine a person's eligibility and allow application to several programs — without having to repeat the same personal information on multiple applications to various state and federal agencies.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 10, 2009
Robert H. Kavanaugh, a retired Baltimore Sun executive and World War II veteran, died of cardiac arrest Dec. 4 at his Clearwater, Fla. home. The former North Baltimore resident was 84. Born in Ellicott City, he was the son of Emmett Patrick Kavanaugh, a vice president of the old A.S. Abell Co., publishers of The Sun. After attending St. Paul's Parochial School in Ellicott City, he graduated from Mount St. Joseph's High School in 1942. He enlisted in the Navy during WWII and served aboard the battleship New York in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Maryland Secretary of Human Resources Brenda Donald told lawmakers yesterday that her agency is doing a better job of using a new computer program to keep track of children in state care. At a General Assembly Joint Audit Committee meeting, Donald said that a recent audit documenting problems with "Chessie" - the Children's Electronic Social Services Information Exchange - "really is old news." Social services employees have entered data from 90 percent of foster care and abuse and neglect investigations, Donald said.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Joe Burris and Sam Sessa and Joe Burris,Sun reporters | October 16, 2007
First, Karen McVearry spent $30 to join the Hannah Montana fan club and buy presale concert tickets for her 9-year-old daughter Maddie. Too late - they had sold out. The 36-year-old Catonsville mom tried again the day the tickets went on sale to the public. As Maddie played soccer, McVearry stood on the sidelines, a cell phone in each hand, calling Ticketmaster, while a friend also called and tried ordering online. Still too late. The Jan. 8 Hannah Montana show at 1st Mariner Arena sold out in minutes.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | January 11, 1994
Most people delegate responsibility for their own health to doctors because they have no clue what else to do. Would they get involved in managing their own care if they could spend more time talking to doctors about important medical topics and less time on hold with an appointment clerk?John Dewey, a doctor working on computer programs in Kaiser Permanente's Mid-Atlantic regional office, answered "yes" to this question when he snapped up a personal-wellness computer program at a health fair on the West Coast a few years ago. He took it back to the company's Rockville headquarters and adapted it so patients could call up basic medical information, make appointments, and describe symptoms to their doctors on a computer.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Click on a 30-foot cabin cruiser. Scroll past an inflatable dinghy. Do a search for a survival suit. It's all part of the Virtual Boat Show."You just push the button and, zippo, you're there," said Paul R. Payne, who designed a computer program to promote this fall's boat shows in Annapolis. The program will appear on the Internet in coming weeks.The on-line program will feature details on everything from new sailboat models to on-board toilets to golden nautical charms. Annapolis Boat Shows supervised the Internet project to advertise its sailboat show Oct. 6-9 and the powerboat show Oct. 13-15.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | July 20, 2007
You wouldn't think checkers could get so complicated. After working for six years with a network of up to 200 computers, Jonathan Schaeffer says he has developed a program that can never lose at checkers. At best, a human (or computer) opponent can achieve a draw. The program was designed with help from some of the world's top checkers players, but the computers did what no player could ever do: analyze 64 million positions on the board each second. "We've taken things to beyond what humans can do," said Schaeffer, chairman of the computer science department at the University of Alberta in Canada.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
Four months after giving the go-ahead to continued use of a problematic student data computer program, the Howard County school system has decided to revert to an older program in order to have 15,000 schedules ready for high school students before classes begin at the end of August. An end-of-the-year data transfer process called a "roll-over" has not been completed, which has resulted in the decision to use the older system in place of the Student Management System (SMS). "We are going down a parallel path," said Linda Wise, assistant superintendent for school administration.
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