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By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Sal Amuquandoh sits on a high stool in the Enoch Pratt Free Library and prepares to take a ride along the Internet. He is using the state-organized computer network called SAILOR that will provide him free access to information from around the world.SAILOR was one of four innovative projects that yesterday received James Madison Awards presented by the Coalition on Government Information. Since 1989, the awards commemorating Freedom of Information Day have been given to "champions of the public's right to know."
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
U.S. commerce "would grind to a halt in a matter of days" in the aftermath of a crippling cyberattack that the nation's ports — including Baltimore — are ill-prepared for, according to a new Brookings Institution report. But port officials here and elsewhere dispute the assessment written by Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph Kramek, who spent a year as a Brookings fellow looking at cybersecurity at six of the nation's busiest waterfronts. The study concluded that failure to bolster defenses against hackers could lead to disruption of the computer networks used to move goods, fuel and food from ships to the marketplace.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | October 3, 1994
County school officials hope to persuade the County Council tonight to let them have the $500,000 for a pilot computer program the council approved during its budget session this past spring but tucked away in a contingency fund.Council members said then that they wanted the school board's technology experts to answer questions about the sophisticated computer network -- dubbed ASAP, Advanced School Automation Project -- and present a complete plan before they turned over the money.A committee planning the network is to meet with council members an hour before tonight's regular meeting to update them on its progress.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Alexander A. Kamantauskas, a computer network engineer and Civil War buff who enjoyed giving highly detailed battlefield tours to family and friends, died May 15 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 45. "Alex knew something about everything, but he was very humble. He was a happy and friendly person who always made friends easily," said Steve Balbach, a longtime friend and a computer engineer who lives in Ashton in Montgomery County. The son of Social Security Administration workers, Alexander Antony Kamantauskas was born in Catonsville and raised in Columbia.
NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz | May 5, 1991
Colleges and universities have tapped the power of personal computers for years to help educate their students. But many institutions of higher learning have found the next step in computer technology difficult to achieve: linking the computers on campus together on a network.Administrators at Villa Julie College, however, say they have installed a computer network that not only connects every computer on campus, but allows students to access off-campus data bases. And they can do it from their homes.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 22, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- In the clearest indication yet of the Clinton administration's willingness to offer broader public access to government information, the National Science Foundation is financing a project that will make corporate filings to the Securities and Exchange Commission available free via a computer network.The decision to support the project, which will provide access to the SEC's on-line data base of financial data from America's public corporations, is a shift away from the federal information policies under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1996
Information Resource Engineering Inc. said yesterday that it has received a patent on its new secure portable modem, a product the company said will promote telecommuting by making it easier for stay-at-home workers to affordably scramble transmissions to their offices."
BUSINESS
August 13, 1997
Yurie Systems Inc. shares rose as much as 28 percent to a record yesterday on agreements with Lucent Technologies Inc. and the new owner of Prodigy Services Co.'s computer network.Shares of Landover-based Yurie rose as much as $6.50 to $30 before settling back to $27 -- a record close -- in the afternoon sell-off that swept the markets. Volume hit 2.1 million shares, more than eight times its three-month daily average. Yurie went public at $12 a share in February.Yurie makes asynchronous transfer mode, or ATM, switch equipment, for high-speed data transmission.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
County Executive John G. Gary has given his unqualified support to the school board's proposed $35 million computer network, pledging to include the money for the first major phase of the plan in his next budget.The Advanced School Automation Project (ASAP) is an intricate computer network that would be installed over the next five years, with at least one 32-terminal laboratory in each county school and additional specialized computer labs in the upper grades.All of the computers will be linked and will be capable of linking to other computer networks such as the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | April 1, 1991
Loyola College and the Department of Defense have teamed up in the establishment of a new campus computer network designed to train future federal government managers to be more computer literate.The computer network -- expected to eventually providetelephone and computer connections among all faculty, students and administrators -- is the first step in establishing the Center for Advanced Information and Resource Management Studies, college officials said Wednesday while demonstrating the system.
NEWS
By Jim Joyner, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman lent his support this week to a pair of bills in Annapolis that would make cyberbullying a crime in Maryland. "The insults and accusations that rush through the cyber-sphere can be beyond anything with which we adults are familiar," said Ulman in written testimony submitted for a March 7 hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. A House version of the bill, the subject of Thursday's hearing, is sponsored by Del. Jon Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakeand her allies on the city's Board of Estimates today voted down a $7.4 million contract with IBM for switching city offices to voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) phones because she believes there needs to be greater coordination between the Municipal Telephone Exchange, which is part of Comptroller Joan Pratt's office, and the Mayor's Office of Information Technology. And who could argue that isn't needed? Switching the phone system could save the city millions of dollars a year, but doing so without the significant participation of the workers who maintain Baltimore's computer network could lead to costly mistakes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
The Maryland State Lottery failed to collect tens of thousands of dollars from manufacturers who did not promptly fix inoperable slot machines, state auditors found in their first review of the agency since the start of the state's slots program in 2010. The audit also found other problems with slots oversight, as well as issues with security protections for the agency's computer networks. Both Bruce Myers, the legislative auditor, and Stephen Martino, the head of the lottery agency, characterized the issues as small problems for a fledgling slots operation that do not translate into any agency wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
A Hungarian man who blackmailed a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job was sentenced to 2.5 years in prison, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, was also sentenced to serve three years of supervised release following his time in prison, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Nemeth pleaded guilty in November to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2011
 Those of us who have been around since the beginning of the computer era will have no trouble remembering the days when we were sold a bill of goods with our first home computer. It went something like this: If you buy now, your computer will be outdated in a matter of months because technology is developing so quickly, but not to worry because you can just upgrade it. According to this theory, each new software upgrade, and each new hardware advance could simply be appended onto the machine we purchased, and we'd always have the latest and greatest.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
A former Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems Inc. employee, who hacked into the chief executive's computerized presentation and replaced it with pornography, was sentenced Tuesday in Baltimore City's first computer hacking case, according to the city's state's attorney's office. Walter Powell, 52, of the 3800 block of Frankford Avenue pleaded guilty to invading the computer system of his former employer. Powell was fired from his job at the Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems in 2009 and began hacking into the computer network, including an incident in which he replaced a presentation to the board of directors with porn, according to a release from the city state's attorney's office.
NEWS
April 26, 1995
Annapolis, a city which revels in the past, could soon become the town of the future with the state's plans to create a computer network that would connect residents, businesses, universities and government agencies.The details are still being ironed out, but state officials are working on a plan that would allow Annapolis residents to sign onto their computers and apply for city permits, converse with their aldermen, retrieve information on state government and keep track of new laws and regulations.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
A former Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems Inc. employee, who hacked into the chief executive's computerized presentation and replaced it with pornography, was sentenced Tuesday in Baltimore City's first computer hacking case, according to the city's state's attorney's office. Walter Powell, 52, of the 3800 block of Frankford Avenue pleaded guilty to invading the computer system of his former employer. Powell was fired from his job at the Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems in 2009 and began hacking into the computer network, including an incident in which he replaced a presentation to the board of directors with porn, according to a release from the city state's attorney's office.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Walter Bowen Jr. was hoping the early bird would catch the job. The Elkridge resident had arrived at 7 a.m. for a job fair at Fort Meade so he could meet with recruiters before they'd been exhausted by crowds of job-seekers. "I wanted to be one of the first five people in line — get in there when people are fresh," said Bowen, 39, a Navy veteran. More than 1,000 people were expected to attend Wednesday's Technical Job Fair, which was open to the public. Some job hunters came from as far away as California and Chicago, said Jerome Duncan, a business work-force specialist with the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
They attacked in waves, breaching several layers of security in an attempt to corrupt a nation's computer network. Two, three, five times per day, the computer hackers tried to get in. And each time the Naval Academy's midshipmen withstood the challenge. But they remained tense as the clock wound down Friday, since their opponents were more than formidable: They were the technical wizards of the National Security Agency. "The biggest surprise is that there haven't been any surprises yet," said Midshipman Ryan W. Collins-Minkel of Tampa, Fla. The Cyber Defense Exercise, conceived by an NSA official seven years ago, pits teams of future military officers against each other to see who can build and maintain the most secure computer network.
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