Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComputer Music
IN THE NEWS

Computer Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
The Peabody Conservatory will offer a new master of music degree in electronic and computer music starting in September, the first such program in the country to offer three specialized areas -- composition, performance and research.Four faculty members, specialists in different aspects of computer music, will teach the program: Jean Eichelberger Ivey, Geoffrey Wright, McGregor Boyle and Edward Pirali. Wright directs the computer music department and designed the two-year degree program.The computer music department for several years has worked with Johns Hopkins University in cross-disciplinary projects such studying bird song and creating music software.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julio Ojeda-Zapata and Julio Ojeda-Zapata,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 5, 2001
Strolling through a college dorm in the late 1970s or the early 1980s, you weren't likely to see anything more high-tech than an LP turntable, a color TV or, perhaps, a computer-science student communicating with a far-off mainframe computer using a primitive video terminal and a pokey modem. The personal-computer age had dawned, but relatively few students took their own MS-DOS PCs or Apple machines to school along with their electric typewriters and Led Zeppelin posters. Their main on-campus exposure to PCs, if they were lucky, involved communal labs where they wrote their papers and perhaps dabbled in a bit of number crunching or desktop publishing.
Advertisement
FEATURES
April 1, 1995
The 20th-Century Music Festival held at Towson State University next week will celebrate the anniversaries of such long-established modern masters as Hindemith, Bartok and Webern, and investigate the growing connections between music and technology. Here's the schedule:Monday, 8:15 p.m.: Chamber music performances by TSU faculty commemorate the 50th anniversaries of the deaths of Webern and Bartok.Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.: New music concert by TSU student composers.Wednesday, noon: Performances of chamber music of Hindemith to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
It's 10 a.m. when the suits arrive. Geoffrey Wright, head o Peabody Conservatory's computer-music department, is on his second large coffee and third hurried meeting.Word has gotten around that Peabody is doing research with something called a "virtual orchestra," so three businessmen have driven up from northern Virginia. They'd like to see for themselves.Wright waves his visitors down a hall, past students hurrying to violin lessons, theory classes or piano practice rooms, and into a small studio filled with computers.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
It's 10 a.m. when the suits arrive. Geoffrey Wright, head o Peabody Conservatory's computer-music department, is on his second large coffee and third hurried meeting.Word has gotten around that Peabody is doing research with something called a "virtual orchestra," so three businessmen have driven up from northern Virginia. They'd like to see for themselves.Wright waves his visitors down a hall, past students hurrying to violin lessons, theory classes or piano practice rooms, and into a small studio filled with computers.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
With a subtle flip of the wrists, Charlene Curtiss sends herself gliding backward in a smooth arc across the polished floor of a rehearsal hall at the Peabody Institute."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1991
CLASSICAL music fans weary of the works of long-dead composers will have little reason to complain when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra invites nine living American composers here and plays their music over a 12-day period.The American Composers' Showcase, which will include public talks, is divided into three segments: The Discovery Series, featuring computer music; a Celebrity Series premiere by Christopher Rouse; and the Live, Gifted and Black series, featuring the works of black composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 26, 1991
C.M.B.Color Me Badd (Giant 24429)At first hearing, what seems to make Color Me Badd so good is its singing. From the lustrous, dreamy "I Adore Mi Amore" to the lusty, languorous "I Wanna Sex You Up," seldom have soul harmonies sounded so sweet. Wonderful as it is, though, that singing is only half of what makes the quartet's debut, "C.M.B.," shine; just as important is the way those smooth harmonies are powered by pumping hip-hop rhythms. It hardly matters whether the groove is synth-pop slick, like the high-tech "Slow Motion," or retro-soul, as with the Motown-flavored "All 4 Love" -- the Badd boys are at home with both.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 1, 1991
Tod Machover, a 37-year-old musician with electrified, Beethoven-like hair, is one part J. S. Bach and one part Antonio Stradivari. He's both a composer and an instrument maker. And it's both the computer-driven music and the computerized instruments he creates that have put him at the cutting edge of music today.His 20-minute "Towards the Center" for six instruments and live computer electronics will be performed tonight at a Discovery concert in the Peabody Institute's Friedberg Hall by David Zinman and members of the Baltimore Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julio Ojeda-Zapata and Julio Ojeda-Zapata,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 5, 2001
Strolling through a college dorm in the late 1970s or the early 1980s, you weren't likely to see anything more high-tech than an LP turntable, a color TV or, perhaps, a computer-science student communicating with a far-off mainframe computer using a primitive video terminal and a pokey modem. The personal-computer age had dawned, but relatively few students took their own MS-DOS PCs or Apple machines to school along with their electric typewriters and Led Zeppelin posters. Their main on-campus exposure to PCs, if they were lucky, involved communal labs where they wrote their papers and perhaps dabbled in a bit of number crunching or desktop publishing.
FEATURES
April 1, 1995
The 20th-Century Music Festival held at Towson State University next week will celebrate the anniversaries of such long-established modern masters as Hindemith, Bartok and Webern, and investigate the growing connections between music and technology. Here's the schedule:Monday, 8:15 p.m.: Chamber music performances by TSU faculty commemorate the 50th anniversaries of the deaths of Webern and Bartok.Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.: New music concert by TSU student composers.Wednesday, noon: Performances of chamber music of Hindemith to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
With a subtle flip of the wrists, Charlene Curtiss sends herself gliding backward in a smooth arc across the polished floor of a rehearsal hall at the Peabody Institute."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 1, 1991
Tod Machover, a 37-year-old musician with electrified, Beethoven-like hair, is one part J. S. Bach and one part Antonio Stradivari. He's both a composer and an instrument maker. And it's both the computer-driven music and the computerized instruments he creates that have put him at the cutting edge of music today.His 20-minute "Towards the Center" for six instruments and live computer electronics will be performed tonight at a Discovery concert in the Peabody Institute's Friedberg Hall by David Zinman and members of the Baltimore Symphony.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1991
CLASSICAL music fans weary of the works of long-dead composers will have little reason to complain when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra invites nine living American composers here and plays their music over a 12-day period.The American Composers' Showcase, which will include public talks, is divided into three segments: The Discovery Series, featuring computer music; a Celebrity Series premiere by Christopher Rouse; and the Live, Gifted and Black series, featuring the works of black composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 26, 1991
C.M.B.Color Me Badd (Giant 24429)At first hearing, what seems to make Color Me Badd so good is its singing. From the lustrous, dreamy "I Adore Mi Amore" to the lusty, languorous "I Wanna Sex You Up," seldom have soul harmonies sounded so sweet. Wonderful as it is, though, that singing is only half of what makes the quartet's debut, "C.M.B.," shine; just as important is the way those smooth harmonies are powered by pumping hip-hop rhythms. It hardly matters whether the groove is synth-pop slick, like the high-tech "Slow Motion," or retro-soul, as with the Motown-flavored "All 4 Love" -- the Badd boys are at home with both.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
The Peabody Conservatory will offer a new master of music degree in electronic and computer music starting in September, the first such program in the country to offer three specialized areas -- composition, performance and research.Four faculty members, specialists in different aspects of computer music, will teach the program: Jean Eichelberger Ivey, Geoffrey Wright, McGregor Boyle and Edward Pirali. Wright directs the computer music department and designed the two-year degree program.The computer music department for several years has worked with Johns Hopkins University in cross-disciplinary projects such studying bird song and creating music software.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
You may hear drums beating above the noise of the crowds at the millennial New Year's Eve celebration in New York's Times Square. You may hear bells from Bali, electric violins, trumpets, a "space flute" and an aboriginal didgeridoo.But you won't see them.The instruments are part of a computer-generated "virtual orchestra" led by Baltimore conductor Forrest Tobey and developed at Peabody Institute that will perform on New Year's Eve in Times Square at what is being dubbed the "world's biggest party."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2000
Millions of listeners are now using their PCs as music players, thanks to MP3 technology that makes it easy to store thousands of songs on a hard drive. Unfortunately, they're stuck with the low-grade, 10-watt speakers that come with most computers. But that's changing. If you have a home network installed - either with traditional Category 5 wiring or the hot new HomePNA phone line technology - you can use the high-powered speakers of your living-room stereo to play music from your PC. The Dell Digital Audio Receiver does the work.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.