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By Robin Miller | April 22, 1998
I CRINGE every time I read about school systems that spend millions of dollars for new computers and computer-related equipment.Smart school superintendents would take the money their districts budget for such items and go shopping on the bustling used computer market. The money they save might be used for books or other necessities.Used computers -- which still have years of use left in them -- can cost as little as $100 each, about $1,000 less than the typical new computers school systems purchase.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Dave Oberholzer has been tracking his iPad since it left China a couple of days ago on its way to his Maryland home. The wireless industry consultant, who lives in Brookeville, can't wait to try out the new device, but he figures his gadget-loving daughters will monopolize it and that he won't get the most use out of it until traveling for work. "They're going to be all over it," said Oberholzer, 42. "There's no doubt. I'll barely be able to touch the thing." Few companies can get consumers so excited that they'll buy a product they haven't actually touched, yet that's what Apple Inc. has managed to do with its iPad.
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BUSINESS
By Jonathan Yenkin and Jonathan Yenkin,AP Business Writer | May 13, 1991
BOSTON -- Digital Equipment Corp., left behind in the personal computer boom, is trying to do some catching up.This week Digital plans to unveil a new line of personal computers under an alliance with Intel Corp.And while analysts don't expect Digital to quickly become a dominant player in the personal computer market, they say the strategy will help the company build on its success designing networks for the small desktop machines."Digital is no longer off the radar scope," said Terry Shannon, an analyst with International Data Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 21, 2001
Whenever I make my semiannual recommendations to PC shoppers, I get calls and messages from Apple Macintosh owners asking why I don't mention their favorite computer. There are a couple of reasons. One is that Macs account for only 5 percent of the desktop computer market (Apple's own figure). Of those customers, a sizable chunk are professional designers and artists at the high end, and schools at the low end. As a general-purpose consumer PC, the Mac really doesn't make much of an impact.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy News Service | June 22, 1991
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- A small chain has jumped on the bandwagon of a fast-growing niche in personal-computer retailing, recently opening what it said is the Sacramento area's first PC superstore.D&G Connecting Point Center expanded a 1,600-square-foot store to 8,500 square feet to become the largest retail computer store in greater Sacramento, a company executive said."To be successful in the personal computer market, you have to be flexible enough to change with the market," said Andy Beal, D&G's director of sales.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 7, 1993
IBM is set to introduce more powerful minicomputers today in the company's latest effort to defend its profitable midsized computer business against increasing competition.The three new models of the IBM AS-400 minicomputer will be up to 80 percent more powerful than the current machines. IBM will also introduce new software and disk storage features to make the AS-400 better able to operate as a "server" -- a central machine feeding and collecting data to and from many workstations linked by a computer network.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | January 9, 1992
International Business Machines Corp. announced price reductions yesterday ranging from 10 percent to 16 percent on several models of its PS/2 computers. It was the sixth time in the past year that "Big Blue" has slashed its prices to spur sagging sales.IBM's fire sale of its PS/2 line is the result of increasing competition from clone-makers, who have continued to clobber the world's largest computer-maker in the market it helped create.The PS/2 line currently has about 19 percent of the personal computer market, according to Information Strategies Group of Vienna, Va., a division of International Data Group.
BUSINESS
By San Francisco Chronicle | April 3, 1995
Hewlett-Packard is making its long-awaited entry into the home computer market this week, announcing a line of aggressively priced multimedia machines that could vault the company into the front ranks of PC manufacturers.Although Palo Alto, Calif.-based HP is a latecomer to the home market, analysts say it is well-positioned to become a major force. The computer and electronics giant already is the ninth-largest and second-fastest growing PC company, even though it has focused exclusively on the business market.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Michael Dresser | March 31, 1996
FOR PERSONAL computer manufacturers, 1995 was a very good year, indeed. The PC industry had sales growth of 22 percent and revenue growth of more than 27 percent. But several industry forecasts point to a big slowdown. One market forecast, by La Jolla, Calif.-based Computer Intelligence Corp., predicts that unit sales of PCs will increase by 12 percent in 1996, about half of last year's growth, while revenues will improve by 9.3 percent, about one-third of last year's gain. How accurate are these forecasts?
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1995
Straight out of Boise State University, Steven R. Appleton joined a local memory-chip maker called Micron Technology Inc. in 1983. It soon seemed that he had chosen a dead-end career.In the mid-1980s, the memory-chip business appeared to be lost forever to Japan. One major American semiconductor company after another, even Intel, the memory-chip pioneer, dropped out of the field, figuring that it would always be a poor business."Back then," recalled Mr. Appleton, who is now Micron's chairman, "it was just a matter of survival for us."
NEWS
By Robin Miller | April 22, 1998
I CRINGE every time I read about school systems that spend millions of dollars for new computers and computer-related equipment.Smart school superintendents would take the money their districts budget for such items and go shopping on the bustling used computer market. The money they save might be used for books or other necessities.Used computers -- which still have years of use left in them -- can cost as little as $100 each, about $1,000 less than the typical new computers school systems purchase.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
As a defense contractor, Alliant Techsystems Inc. developed high-tech electronic systems used in foreign deserts and jungles in wartime.But with the ebb of defense contracts, the 36-year-old technology company has turned its expertise to the home front and the war against crime.The company's technology division, based in Annapolis, developed what it calls a "ruggedized" laptop computer that can survive extreme temperatures and sharp blows and comes equipped with antennae that allow police officers to stay in contact with dispatchers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Michael Dresser | March 31, 1996
FOR PERSONAL computer manufacturers, 1995 was a very good year, indeed. The PC industry had sales growth of 22 percent and revenue growth of more than 27 percent. But several industry forecasts point to a big slowdown. One market forecast, by La Jolla, Calif.-based Computer Intelligence Corp., predicts that unit sales of PCs will increase by 12 percent in 1996, about half of last year's growth, while revenues will improve by 9.3 percent, about one-third of last year's gain. How accurate are these forecasts?
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1995
Straight out of Boise State University, Steven R. Appleton joined a local memory-chip maker called Micron Technology Inc. in 1983. It soon seemed that he had chosen a dead-end career.In the mid-1980s, the memory-chip business appeared to be lost forever to Japan. One major American semiconductor company after another, even Intel, the memory-chip pioneer, dropped out of the field, figuring that it would always be a poor business."Back then," recalled Mr. Appleton, who is now Micron's chairman, "it was just a matter of survival for us."
BUSINESS
By San Francisco Chronicle | April 3, 1995
Hewlett-Packard is making its long-awaited entry into the home computer market this week, announcing a line of aggressively priced multimedia machines that could vault the company into the front ranks of PC manufacturers.Although Palo Alto, Calif.-based HP is a latecomer to the home market, analysts say it is well-positioned to become a major force. The computer and electronics giant already is the ninth-largest and second-fastest growing PC company, even though it has focused exclusively on the business market.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | March 29, 1995
Most of the people who write about computers for newspapers and magazines are very knowledgeable about all the blips and beeps and other techie stuff.On the other hand, I'm not a computer whiz, although my job has forced me to learn how to use them. I can muddle through most programs and even fool the totally blip-deprived into thinking I'm some kind of hacker.In a strange way, that makes me better qualified than most experts to give advice to those who don't have a computer, know little about them, but are thinking of making the leap.
BUSINESS
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 15, 1992
Want a look at the future of personal computing? Try Newton, a personal digital assistant being developed by Apple Computer Inc.The sleek, black, suit-pocket-sized machine is designed for everyone from business people to students to whoever wants to take notes, make appointments, sketch, summon information and communicate with distant computers and faxes.Apple started to develop this machine in response to several strong trends. One was the increasing digitization of information: Words, numbers, sounds, pictures -- all are being stored and manipulated as bits these days.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | October 11, 1993
Imagine IBM signing up with Walt Disney to produce a Mickey Mouse computer and you'll have some idea of the craziness in the home computer market today.With corporate sales flattening, home is where the action is. Even a company whose middle name is "Business" is getting into the act with a variety of inexpensive new machines designed to please mom and dad, who want to bring work from the office, and the kids, who want to do their homework and be entertained.Personal computers are popping up in appliance stores, next to the refrigerators and VCRs, and in department stores, two aisles down from the pots and pans.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | October 11, 1993
Imagine IBM signing up with Walt Disney to produce a Mickey Mouse computer and you'll have some idea of the craziness in the home computer market today.With corporate sales flattening, home is where the action is. Even a company whose middle name is "Business" is getting into the act with a variety of inexpensive new machines designed to please mom and dad, who want to bring work from the office, and the kids, who want to do their homework and be entertained.Personal computers are popping up in appliance stores, next to the refrigerators and VCRs, and in department stores, two aisles down from the pots and pans.
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