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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Carroll's labor force earned high marks for basic skills but was found deficient in the written communication and technology skills today's employers seek, according to the results of a county-commissioned survey. Computer literacy and employee training were the top concerns of the 128 companies that responded to the survey, which was presented yesterday to the county's Economic Development Commission. Several commission members said the study, which cost the county $6,500, shows the county's schools and colleges should offer courses to meet the technology demands of the business community.
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FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
After school three days a week, Alexis Corbin, 16, a junior at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, walks the short distance to Coppin State University. There, she and 10 other students participate in the Comcast Digital Connectors Program at the Coppin Heights-Rosemont Family Computer Center on campus. They learn about computers, financial literacy and leadership, and in turn bring their knowledge to the community, by leading classes on such topics as how to use social media, operate cell phones or create website pages.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
He uses words like "chill" and "dude" just like any other junior at the Johns Hopkins University, but Vivek Baluja did something yesterday that no other Hopkins' student -- or anyone else for that matter -- has done before: welcome Microsoft to a city recreation center to show off a shining new computer room.William H. Gates, father of Microsoft mogul Bill Gates and head of the Gates Foundation, came to Baltimore to meet Baluja months after the student struck up a correspondence with father and son via e-mail.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Carroll's labor force earned high marks for basic skills but was found deficient in the written communication and technology skills today's employers seek, according to the results of a county-commissioned survey. Computer literacy and employee training were the top concerns of the 128 companies that responded to the survey, which was presented yesterday to the county's Economic Development Commission. Several commission members said the study, which cost the county $6,500, shows the county's schools and colleges should offer courses to meet the technology demands of the business community.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
About this section Reading by 9 is a project aimed at helping Baltimore-area students learn to read well by third grade. This section will offer resources and stories designed to help parents and children have fun reading together. 4KIDS: Teacher of the month Study with Schooligans Today's high-tech teachers know what their students need to succeed. Ms. Donna Girard, a middle school computer literacy teacher in Bow, N.H., is no exception. She's exceptional and she's www.4Kids.org's first Teacher of the Month.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY RRTC and SUSAN BONDY RRTC,Creators Syndicate | May 14, 1995
In the next few months, many students, teachers and education professionals will be looking for temporary or summer jobs. These suggestions should improve the odds:* Start now, and be persistent. An early start will give you an edge, but don't be discouraged if it takes awhile to line up a job. Companies' needs change, so if there are no openings now, call back in a month.* Explore all potential job sources. Besides newspaper ads, ask relatives, teachers, friends and neighbors for job leads.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
They are not exactly your garden-variety computer hackers, Sean and Stasia. But for the moment, they are transfixed by a computer graphics program at the Futurekids Computer Learning Center as if it were the latest episode of the popular "Power Rangers" television show.A fidgety Stasia Golembiewski, sporting a pink bow in her hair and matching pink dress, says she's partial to a rabbit icon on the screen. Her computer mate, Sean Pines, looks as if he's more ready for a spin around the block on a tricycle than an hour at the computer.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
Kyriakos Gary Ambridge believes his daughter and other children are being shortchanged by what he says is Harford County's lack of emphasis on computer literacy.The school system has no computer curriculum and no long-range plan for teaching students computer literacy, Mr. Ambridge said. And that hurts all students, including his 8-year-old daughter, Susan."Every school needs the latest technology in computers. We have to start teaching our children now," he said. He said students who don't get the instructional technology they need will be at a disadvantage when they compete against better educated children -- whether that competition is for college admission or jobs.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | March 10, 1996
VERA MCCULLOUGH, the most tireless volunteer you'll ever meet, has invited me to Brooklyn Park Elementary School to see the computer lab parents have worked so hard to create. "What you see here," she says with a sweep of her arm, "is a bunch of junk."Oh, make no mistake, she says, 20-odd ancient IBM PCs are better than nothing. Still, she says, they're junk. Dinosaurs. A hodgepodge of outdated technology gathered from donors -- local businesses, the National Security Agency -- that have moved on to state-of-the-art equipment.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | August 26, 1991
Nine-year-old Kate Hyatt, still giddy from her victory in a mock computer "Olympics," sits glued to a monitor and keyboard as she manipulates a simulated juggler into catching letters that are hurled through the air.The game is called Alphabet Circus, but it's more than just fun. It teaches young computer novices to get comfortable with the keyboard.Later, they can learn where to properly position their fingers.But Kate Hyatt isn't learning the computer feats at the school she attends in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Tom Pelton and Erika Niedowski and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
Efforts to bridge the "digital divide" - the gap in computer literacy between the rich and poor - are stumbling over bureaucratic foul-ups, poor planning and other problems in Baltimore's schools and public housing. More than 5,000 computers donated for city classrooms have been sitting in a warehouse for six months. The school district says it doesn't have the money to upgrade or install the machines, even though last year the city school board spent nearly $10 million it hadn't budgeted on a computer system for administrators.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 16, 2001
In Baltimore City Police investigating accident that killed Curley student, 15 Police said yesterday that they are continuing to investigate the cause of a traffic accident Wednesday that claimed the life of Tulley Sullivan, 15, an Archbishop Curley High School student and junior varsity basketball player. The accident occurred about 4:40 p.m. in the 3900 block of Frankford Ave. when a 1994 GEO Prizm driven west by a teammate veered off the right side of the road, bounced off a curb, spun into the eastbound lane and struck a utility pole, police said.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
About this section Reading by 9 is a project aimed at helping Baltimore-area students learn to read well by third grade. This section will offer resources and stories designed to help parents and children have fun reading together. 4KIDS: Teacher of the month Study with Schooligans Today's high-tech teachers know what their students need to succeed. Ms. Donna Girard, a middle school computer literacy teacher in Bow, N.H., is no exception. She's exceptional and she's www.4Kids.org's first Teacher of the Month.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 18, 1999
Despite what my geek-hipster friends say, I think you're still allowed to be of two minds about the computer revolution -- excited about its conveniences and possibilities, skeptical of its claims and potential. You're no troglodyte if you use a computer daily but remain otherwise detached. You're not a techno-trog if you think the need for computers in the classroom and the home has been overstated. Computer literacy might be important, but shouldn't literacy itself come first?Then again, isn't it wonderful how the Internet -- e-mail and all that -- has saved the written word?
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
He uses words like "chill" and "dude" just like any other junior at the Johns Hopkins University, but Vivek Baluja did something yesterday that no other Hopkins' student -- or anyone else for that matter -- has done before: welcome Microsoft to a city recreation center to show off a shining new computer room.William H. Gates, father of Microsoft mogul Bill Gates and head of the Gates Foundation, came to Baltimore to meet Baluja months after the student struck up a correspondence with father and son via e-mail.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1997
In yesterday's Today section, the incorrect funding organization was noted for the computer education program at the Pimlico branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The Whole New World Program at that branch is funded by the Samuel I. "Sandy" Rosenberg Fund. The Annie E. Casey Foundation will fund the program at the Pennsylvania Avenue and Brooklyn branches.The Sun regrets the error.Ten-year-old Vincent Dawkins surfs through cyberspace toward the 21st century as confidently as Christopher Columbus sailed forth toward his new world.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1994
David Caropresi, who is 3, sits on a raised stenographer's chair in his family's upstairs office, using the computer to play with dinosaur software, clicking the computer's mouse to make things happen.He has used the program since he was 26 months old, and "by the time he was 2 1/2 , he could name six or seven dinosaurs -- before he could count to 10," said his mother, Christine Caropresi, a corporate relocation specialist in Wexford, Pa.He has some difficulty moving the mouse where he wants it, she said, but no problems exploring the software at his own speed.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 16, 2001
In Baltimore City Police investigating accident that killed Curley student, 15 Police said yesterday that they are continuing to investigate the cause of a traffic accident Wednesday that claimed the life of Tulley Sullivan, 15, an Archbishop Curley High School student and junior varsity basketball player. The accident occurred about 4:40 p.m. in the 3900 block of Frankford Ave. when a 1994 GEO Prizm driven west by a teammate veered off the right side of the road, bounced off a curb, spun into the eastbound lane and struck a utility pole, police said.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | March 10, 1996
VERA MCCULLOUGH, the most tireless volunteer you'll ever meet, has invited me to Brooklyn Park Elementary School to see the computer lab parents have worked so hard to create. "What you see here," she says with a sweep of her arm, "is a bunch of junk."Oh, make no mistake, she says, 20-odd ancient IBM PCs are better than nothing. Still, she says, they're junk. Dinosaurs. A hodgepodge of outdated technology gathered from donors -- local businesses, the National Security Agency -- that have moved on to state-of-the-art equipment.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 28, 1995
If you have a throbbing social conscience and need something new to worry about, consider computers and the African-American.As a group, blacks are shunning the mad rush to put computers in their homes.A government survey says only 11 percent of black households have computers.That puts them dead last -- behind Asians, 39 percent; whites, 28 percent; Native Americans, 21 percent; and Hispanics, 13 percent.With much of the population going goofy over cyberspace, why are blacks turning away?
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