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BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
In a bid to get into the classroom, Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. of Baltimore said yesterday that it will use school computer labs being built by a California-based start-up company to launch Internet teaching and testing programs.Sylvan also said it has made an unspecified investment in the company, San Roman, Calif.-based ZapMe! Corp. The privately held company has built computer labs in 90 schools in about a dozen states since October. It plans to have labs in 2,000 schools by the end of the year.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The Baltimore County school system is eliminating the jobs of more than 100 technology teachers in elementary schools next fall, saying it is time to move away from teaching technology in a computer laboratory. The change means students in some schools will no longer take a once-a-week computer class, using a computer lab to learn skills and do research. Under the new technology plan, the district intends to provide pupils and their teachers in 10 elementary schools with tablets or laptops next year.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
County Executive John G. Gary is considering proposing a referendum in November 1998 to ask voters whether they would be willing to pay a temporary tax of $100 million to add computer labs and repair county schools.A citizens committee on school improvements will discuss the tax when it starts meeting this fall, said county spokeswoman Lisa Ritter. The committee is also considering other options for raising revenue.School officials have long said that the county's 117 schools need about $70 million in maintenance work.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
The physical needs of Baltimore City schools seem overwhelming. Leaky roofs, faulty boilers, boarded-over windows, broken or non-existent air conditioning, unusable water fountains and outmoded science labs. Baltimore has the oldest inventory of schools in the state, and thanks to years of disinvestment, mismanagement and a reluctance to reduce the system's physical capacity to meet a historic decline in enrollment, they have been allowed to deteriorate to a point where proper instruction and learning are difficult if not impossible.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2000
The fight to keep classrooms free of advertising may force 59 of Baltimore's middle and high schools to give up free high-speed Internet computer labs. ZapMe Corp., a California company that gives schools free computers and satellite Internet links in exchange for students' viewing ads on the World Wide Web, says it is quitting the education market because it is unwilling to keep fighting a growing national backlash against commercialism in classrooms. The company's decision means Baltimore school officials may soon have to decide whether they are willing to start paying fees to ZapMe that could run as high as hundreds of thousands of dollars or watch as some of the most advanced computer labs in the city schools get shut down.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
County Executive John G. Gary is considering proposing a referendum in November 1998 to ask voters whether they would be willing to pay a temporary tax of $100 million to add computer labs and repair county schools.A citizens committee on school improvements will discuss the tax when it starts meeting this fall, said county spokeswoman Lisa Ritter. The committee is also considering other options for raising revenue.School officials have long said that the county's 117 schools need about $70 million in maintenance work.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
The 30 new computers were expected last summer, so Principal Kevin Dennehy's staff excitedly dismantled its increasingly dated lab to make room for the machines. "[The lab] is empty this year," said Dennehy, who runs George Fox Middle School in Pasadena. The computers never arrived at George Fox, or at any of Anne Arundel County's 31 middle and high schools. Legal wrangling over which company deserved a $25 million, three-year contract to lease more than 12,000 computers to the school district has put the project, called "Technology Refresh," a year behind schedule.
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 26, 2001
In Baltimore City Man, officer exchange gunfire in robbery attempt at restaurant A gunman escaped after exchanging shots with an off-duty city police officer Saturday night in a robbery attempt at a fast-food restaurant in Southwest Baltimore, authorities reported. Officer Eyvette Jones, 44, of the child abuse unit, was in plainclothes and eating a meal at the Wendy's restaurant in the 2300 block of Frederick Ave. about 9:15 p.m. when the gunman entered and tried to open a cash register.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
Students at Carroll Community College will pay $3 more per credit hour to attend class.The college's board of trustees voted last night to raise tuition for county residents from $67 to $70 per credit hour. The increase is expected to generate an additional $113,000, most of which will be used to upgrade campus computer labs.The average full-time student -- who registers for about 12.5 credits per semester -- will now pay about $1,079 per semester, including other fees.It is the fifth consecutive year tuition has gone up at Carroll, but Alan Schuman, executive vice president for administration and budget director, said Carroll will remain at about the state average for community colleges, which was $67 for the 1998-1999 school year.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
Even a majority-Republican County Council determined to forge a reputation for fiscal prudence might find it hard to stand up to pressure to fund a computer network for students this year. But the Anne Arundel council, which rightly has been wary of the school board's ambitious Advanced School Automation Project, known as ASAP, needs to stand firm.Council members need a lot more information from school officials before they commit tens of millions of dollars to a network linking all county school computer labs.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Although the Baltimore County public school system has a declining number of students overall, pockets of growth continue to cause crowding in some schools, and officials must "think creatively" to balance the district's space needs, the head of the county school board said in an interview yesterday. "A lot of times, such as in the Towson situation, you don't even have the option of moving kids around to nearby schools because those schools are in the same crowded position," board President JoAnn C. Murphy said.
NEWS
By Rochelle McConkie and Rochelle McConkie,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2007
It's a worn brick building surrounded by a well-used playground and basketball courts where most of the hoops are missing nets. But inside the Robinwood Community Center, youths and other residents can find a top-of-the-line computer laboratory with 10 19-inch flat screens, wireless Internet, printers and a projector. Northrop Grumman, the defense contractor based in Linthicum, installed the new computer lab Friday as part of its renovation of the center in the Annapolis public housing neighborhood.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
For nearly two decades, Anne Peach has taught graphic arts at a Catonsville high school using Apple Macintosh computers, knowing her students would use that system in the working world. But the Apple logo has given way to the waving Windows icon in Baltimore County schools' graphic design and multimedia computer labs, and Peach is furious. "We have," she said, "potentially thousands of students who are potentially not going to be prepared after this year's class." Most of the county school system's computers are PCs running Microsoft Windows software, but not in the labs for the graphic and multimedia programs, until now. School system leaders say the move makes sense because it will make it easier to provide technical support and because graphic design software is available for both platforms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Li Fellers and Li Fellers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
When Bernard Harrigan walked into Jordan High School in Los Angeles last spring, the computers in his classroom were 10 years old and, essentially, useless. Internet access was not possible. The mice were broken. The chips were pre-Pentium. A few months later, Harrigan started Computers For School, a nonprofit that finds donated computers, repairs them, delivers them and sets them up at schools with few options to get them, yet need them. The 30-year-old computer teacher said that after his volunteer staff finishes refurbishing the computers, all teachers and students need to do is turn them on - which sometimes isn't possible when donations arrive.
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 26, 2001
In Baltimore City Man, officer exchange gunfire in robbery attempt at restaurant A gunman escaped after exchanging shots with an off-duty city police officer Saturday night in a robbery attempt at a fast-food restaurant in Southwest Baltimore, authorities reported. Officer Eyvette Jones, 44, of the child abuse unit, was in plainclothes and eating a meal at the Wendy's restaurant in the 2300 block of Frederick Ave. about 9:15 p.m. when the gunman entered and tried to open a cash register.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
The 30 new computers were expected last summer, so Principal Kevin Dennehy's staff excitedly dismantled its increasingly dated lab to make room for the machines. "[The lab] is empty this year," said Dennehy, who runs George Fox Middle School in Pasadena. The computers never arrived at George Fox, or at any of Anne Arundel County's 31 middle and high schools. Legal wrangling over which company deserved a $25 million, three-year contract to lease more than 12,000 computers to the school district has put the project, called "Technology Refresh," a year behind schedule.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Glenelg Country School will break ground tomorrow afternoon for a $4 million middle school and performing arts center, a project intended to keep up with the school's rapidly expanding enrollment.The building is expected to be completed by next summer and will allow the private, college preparatory school to expand its middle-school enrollment from 110 to about 150 students, said Ryland O. Chapman III, the school's headmaster.The 350-seat theater will give the school performance space on campus -- rather than having to rent theater space -- and improve the quality of its drama program, Chapman said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck | June 28, 1993
Md. intrastate calls now less expensiveThe cost of intrastate phone calls in Maryland plunged by 19.8 percent in the past year, but remains slightly above the national average, a new survey says.National Utility Service Inc., a consulting firm, looked at the cost of a three-minute, 25-mile call within a "local area," in telephone terms. Maryland's cost fell from 86 cents in 1992 to 69 cents, compared with a U.S. average of 66 cents.National Utility Service attributed the drop, the second-largest in the country, to increased competition here.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2000
The fight to keep classrooms free of advertising may force 59 of Baltimore's middle and high schools to give up free high-speed Internet computer labs. ZapMe Corp., a California company that gives schools free computers and satellite Internet links in exchange for students' viewing ads on the World Wide Web, says it is quitting the education market because it is unwilling to keep fighting a growing national backlash against commercialism in classrooms. The company's decision means Baltimore school officials may soon have to decide whether they are willing to start paying fees to ZapMe that could run as high as hundreds of thousands of dollars or watch as some of the most advanced computer labs in the city schools get shut down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
Whitney Hess wants to make life as simple as possible. She keeps to-do lists, phone numbers and addresses in her Handspring Visor and uses the handheld PC to check local movie listings. She has a CD writer to "burn" her own albums, a digital camcorder for video editing, and a DVD player built into her laptop for movies on the go. Should she need to send snail-mail, she can write a letter on her computer and print an address sticker for the envelope with her label writer. But she's more likely to communicate by e-mail with a wireless gizmo the size of a pager.
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