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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 2002
TOKYO -- Dell Computer Corp. Chief Executive Officer Michael Dell said yesterday that worldwide demand for computer hardware has improved and the Far East will be a good market for the world's biggest personal computer maker. "Globally, we've seen some rebound in overall demand," Dell said at a news conference in Tokyo, where he introduced the company's smallest desktop computer. "There's great opportunity for Dell, especially in Japan and Asia Pacific." Dell surpassed Hewlett-Packard Co. in the third quarter to again become the world's biggest personal-computer maker, market researcher IDC said earlier this month.
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NEWS
May 12, 2010
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NEWS
March 7, 2000
Police Westminster: An employee at General Dynamics told police Friday that computer hardware was stolen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2004
When most computer repairmen answer the telephone only to hear a potential client claim a PC was shot with a pistol or accidentally dropped into the Amazon River, the repairmen hang up while wondering why someone would take the time to make up such a ridiculous story. At DriveSavers, the employees smile and tell you they've seen worse. Accidents happen, and quite often they seem to happen the night before your dissertation is due, or two days before you are scheduled to give a once-in-a-lifetime business presentation.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
A former top official of the information systems department of Harford County government and his wife were indicted yesterday on charges of theft of computers and other equipment from the county. Terry Claiborne and Michelle Claiborne were each indicted on charges of theft over $500, attempted theft over $500 and conspiracy to commit theft, according to Joseph I. Cassilly, state's attorney for Harford County. The Claibornes are expected to surrender tomorrow, Cassilly said. The indictment, handed up by the Harford County grand jury, charges the couple with theft of computers, laptops, digital and movie cameras, a projector and other computer hardware, software and supplies.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
Charity came to the rescue of Jubilee Baltimore during Christmas week.About a week after a burglar took office equipment from the Southeast Baltimore nonprofit developer, donations of computers and more than $6,000 have come in from a dozen individuals and foundations.Jubilee's office at 2000 E. Lombard St. was burglarized Dec. 19, the day Jubilee's staff attended a memorial service for the organization's founder, Benton Neal Harris Jr.Charles Duff, president of Jubilee, said he believes someone came into Jubilee's offices while the staff was away, took the maintenance man's keys and returned later to steal two computers, two printers, a fax machine, electric typewriter, wall clock, sugar bowl and creamer.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
Annapolis has moved one step closer to building its first publicly owned bus terminal in the city.The Mass Transit Administration received about $2 million in transit funds this week to help pay for statewide projects such as purchasing buses and computer software and hardware, according to Democratic U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes.Part of those funds, issued by the Federal Transit Administration, will pay for a study that will create a design for a bus terminal and transfer center for the state's capital.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 26, 1999
WANT TO cash in on high-tech stocks? "They may have tremendous potential," says Black Enterprise, March, "but how do you tell the difference between a sure thing and a pipe dream?" "The simple fact is this: Technology shares just aren't measured like other stocks. "Many software, hardware, semiconductor and Net shares just don't fit the neat, understandable price-earnings multiples that we've learned to use as a guide." The article suggests that investors stick "to companies that dominate their industries.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | August 17, 1991
Isaac Shafran, who presided over the port of Baltimore's massive capital expansion program for the last five years, has resigned as director of development for the Maryland Port Administration.He becomes the second of the port agency's five directors to resign since Adrian G. Teel took over the helm of the MPA in late June with orders to revitalize the troubled port agency. The director of personnel, Tracy V. Drake, left July 5."Isaac's been an extremely hard worker for the port," Mr. Teel said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1993
New book gives parents computer helpI get lots of mail from parents wondering what's the best computer hardware and software for their families.Parents know they don't want their children endlessly playing mindless Nintendo games. But when they walk into a computer store, most are overwhelmed by the products available.A new book that identifies this growing problem might be the answer. "Parents, Kids & Computers," by R. Raskin and C. Ellison, is billed as an activity guide that makes the personal computer a center of quality family time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 4, 2004
Most of us look at a toaster and see a kitchen appliance for crisping bread. Scott Fullam looks at a toaster and sees an engineering challenge, compelling him to open it up and make it do something the manufacturer never intended. The result: a toaster that burns the words "hot" or "cool" on the side of a slice of bread. Fullam, a 37-year-old computer consultant in Menlo Park, Calif., is at the forefront of a new trend called "hardware hacking." Or maybe it's an old trend - teen-agers in the 1950s who turned ordinary cars into hot rods by modifying the engines and bodies were driven by the same desire to take everyday objects in new directions.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
A former top official of the information systems department of Harford County government and his wife were indicted yesterday on charges of theft of computers and other equipment from the county. Terry Claiborne and Michelle Claiborne were each indicted on charges of theft over $500, attempted theft over $500 and conspiracy to commit theft, according to Joseph I. Cassilly, state's attorney for Harford County. The Claibornes are expected to surrender tomorrow, Cassilly said. The indictment, handed up by the Harford County grand jury, charges the couple with theft of computers, laptops, digital and movie cameras, a projector and other computer hardware, software and supplies.
BUSINESS
By Mark A. Sellers and Mark A. Sellers,MORNINGSTAR.COM | June 1, 2003
Most of the really valuable lessons I've learned about investing have come from experience. A master of business administration degree is nice, but that's only enough to get you into the game. If you want to win the game, you have to follow some rules of thumb that the textbooks won't teach you. Here are 44. 1. When people say, "Things are different this time," they're trying to sell you something. 2. Don't invest in what you don't understand. If you do, you'll eventually get burned. 3. When a company delays a financial filing for any reason, avoid the stock.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 2002
TOKYO -- Dell Computer Corp. Chief Executive Officer Michael Dell said yesterday that worldwide demand for computer hardware has improved and the Far East will be a good market for the world's biggest personal computer maker. "Globally, we've seen some rebound in overall demand," Dell said at a news conference in Tokyo, where he introduced the company's smallest desktop computer. "There's great opportunity for Dell, especially in Japan and Asia Pacific." Dell surpassed Hewlett-Packard Co. in the third quarter to again become the world's biggest personal-computer maker, market researcher IDC said earlier this month.
NEWS
March 7, 2000
Police Westminster: An employee at General Dynamics told police Friday that computer hardware was stolen.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 26, 1999
WANT TO cash in on high-tech stocks? "They may have tremendous potential," says Black Enterprise, March, "but how do you tell the difference between a sure thing and a pipe dream?" "The simple fact is this: Technology shares just aren't measured like other stocks. "Many software, hardware, semiconductor and Net shares just don't fit the neat, understandable price-earnings multiples that we've learned to use as a guide." The article suggests that investors stick "to companies that dominate their industries.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
The County Council last night postponed a decision to release $500,000 in seed money for a new computer system for county schools after it raised questions about the program's feasibility.The council said it will take up the matter at its next meeting in two weeks. In the meantime, Board of Education staff will work to answer council members' questions, such as whether the system will become obsolete before installation is complete.The council also expressed concern that releasing the $500,000 for the computer network -- dubbed ASAP, Advanced School Automation Project -- would commit the council that will be elected next month to the entire project.
BUSINESS
By Robin Stacy and Robin Stacy,Knight-Ridder News Service VNB | April 13, 1992
In an earlier day, correspondence was king.People conducted business, fell in love or discussed ideas, all by letter.Then came the telegraph, and the letter's decline began. This new thing brought speed -- you could communicate your thoughts instantly. That your thoughts were no longer conveyed as a well-thought-out bit of prose was just an unfortunate consequence.The telephone seemed to ring the letter's death knell.But just as technology nearly brought the letter's demise, it's now providing its salvation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1998
For a moment, forget about planes falling from the sky. Forget about power outages and other millennial mayhem caused by the Year 2000 computer glitch. It's time to think about the personal computer humming in your family room.If you believe the Year 2000 date recognition problem affects only antiquated mainframes, think again. Greenwich Mean Time, British maker of Year 2000 repair software, estimates that 93 percent of PCs built before 1996 will have problems ringing in the millennium.Even if your PC is barely out of the box, don't gloat yet. Eleven percent of computers built this year may have problems recognizing the date change, according to the Y2K consultant.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
Annapolis has moved one step closer to building its first publicly owned bus terminal in the city.The Mass Transit Administration received about $2 million in transit funds this week to help pay for statewide projects such as purchasing buses and computer software and hardware, according to Democratic U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes.Part of those funds, issued by the Federal Transit Administration, will pay for a study that will create a design for a bus terminal and transfer center for the state's capital.
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