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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2000
One slow summer day about two years ago, teen-ager Kate Mowery was lounging around the house, breezily flipping through a book on flight simulation. She scanned a chapter or two on ray-tracing. Perused some sections on techniques for graphically rendering three-dimensional objects. Something was puzzling Mowery. Why weren't the methods used to render opaque spheres undergoing constant rotation around a fixed axis near a fixed light source as efficient or as accurate as they could be?
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NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2006
When Myers Abraham Davis decided he wanted to spend two years buried in a lab, laboring over a sophisticated computer science project, he had never so much as taken a computer programming class or written one line of a program. The teenager couldn't type without looking at his hands. In other words, Abe was just being Abe. People who know the Polytechnic Institute senior say he loves challenges that carry a whiff of impossibility - and he's very determined. If this were a movie, there would be a montage at this point set to a pulsating soundtrack.
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NEWS
April 14, 1991
Services will be conducted at 3 p.m. today for Jackie Sterns Potts of Columbia, a Howard Community College instructor who ran a computer graphics company.Potts was the last person identified among the 23 people killed in the April 4 crash of a commuter plane near Brunswick, Ga.The services will be at the Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home in Silver Spring.Potts was traveling with a friend, June T. Amlie of Bethesda, looking at retirement homes in Georgia, said her son, James Hutchison Potts III of Mount Airy.
NEWS
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND MARY MCNAMARA and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND MARY MCNAMARA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
As it attempts to halt the year's box office slide, Hollywood is bringing out the Howitzer for the holidays -- the turbocharged children's film. For the last five years, PG-13 has ruled the box office; it's the imprimatur of the top-grossing films of the year. Now kids' films, PG-rated and amped up with computer graphics, are trying to catch up. The gentle fantasy of C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, with its snowy landscapes and talking animals, gives way to a fight-to-the-death battle between loyal Narnians and the ghoul-filled army of the White Witch.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 18, 1997
Keith Huggins' former classmates at Liberty High School should not be surprised to find his name among the closing credits of the Hollywood movie "Dante's Peak."After all, they voted Huggins "Most Artistic" during their senior year in 1988.Huggins, 26, works as a digital artist for Digital Domain, a California company that created the computer graphics for "Dante's Peak," which, according to its distributor, Universal Pictures, scored the biggest opening in movie history on Feb 7.The Carroll native was among 100 artists who worked on the movie's post production, using graphics computers to create realistic effects for the fictitious Dante's Peak.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
Lockheed Martin Corp. has teamed with Intel Corp., the world's largest computer chip manufacturer, to develop high-quality, real-time, three-dimensional graphics for use in home computers, the companies announced yesterday.The new product, which is expected to be ready for the market in the second half of next year, is a less expensive version of the Lockheed Martin R3D/100 3-D computer board to be introduced later this year.The R3D/100 computer board is designed for architects and professional computer graphic design companies, said Carlton Caldwell, a spokesman for Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin.
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | December 10, 1990
More than 135 computer hardware and software vendors are setting up shop in the Convention Center, as the Baltimore Computer Conference & Exposition returns to the city Wednesday.The second annual conference and expo, a two-day event sponsored by National Trade Productions Inc. of Alexandria, Va., is open to anyone interested in computers and information systems, according to Steven P. Henke, marketing manager for the Baltimore show."We target upper-level managers and computer professionals," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2001
Animators working on the movie "Shrek" spent two months crafting a technically complex 3 1/2 -second shot. The star wasn't the rotund green ogre in the movie's title role, but a frothy glass of milk. Considering that Hollywood special-effects wizards have managed to create dinosaurs that stalk real actors, computer-generated hair that appears to blow naturally in the wind and countless fiery explosions, an ordinary glass of pure white milk might not seem too difficult. In reality, the task is among the most daunting in the field of computer graphics.
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | May 26, 1991
Robin Tayson will graduate from Harford Technical High School with the second highest grades in her class and a $2,000 college scholarship.That may not seem particularly remarkable until you consider she kept up her grades and school work during a dark time for her family.A year ago, her father, Leander, died from lung cancer."It was real sudden," recalled Robin, 17. "It all happened in the span of two weeks."Her father had been diagnosed as having cancer a few years ago and had undergone surgery and appeared to have recuperated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- It turns out that George Washington was one good-looking guy. The image of Washington as a young man is slowly becoming clearer, and it is not what first comes to mind when people think of the "father of our country." Instead of a white-haired old man, think of a rangy hunk who looks like a quarterback. Researchers working to change perceptions of Washington by re-creating his image at earlier times in his life have produced three-dimensional computer images of what he must have looked like at ages 19, 45 and 57. Using a combination of forensic science, anthropology, computer graphics and a lot of detective work, they show faces that are both familiar and different.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- It turns out that George Washington was one good-looking guy. The image of Washington as a young man is slowly becoming clearer, and it is not what first comes to mind when people think of the "father of our country." Instead of a white-haired old man, think of a rangy hunk who looks like a quarterback. Researchers working to change perceptions of Washington by re-creating his image at earlier times in his life have produced three-dimensional computer images of what he must have looked like at ages 19, 45 and 57. Using a combination of forensic science, anthropology, computer graphics and a lot of detective work, they show faces that are both familiar and different.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2001
Animators working on the movie "Shrek" spent two months crafting a technically complex 3 1/2 -second shot. The star wasn't the rotund green ogre in the movie's title role, but a frothy glass of milk. Considering that Hollywood special-effects wizards have managed to create dinosaurs that stalk real actors, computer-generated hair that appears to blow naturally in the wind and countless fiery explosions, an ordinary glass of pure white milk might not seem too difficult. In reality, the task is among the most daunting in the field of computer graphics.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
Daniel Dickinson Schaeffer, who learned to operate a computer, draw and paint despite having limited use of his hands, died of complications from a degenerative muscular disease Monday at his Westminster home. He was 28. When he was 3, Mr. Schaeffer was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy that sapped his strength and left him with limited use of his arms. Since 1984, he had gotten around by using a motorized wheelchair. Nonetheless, he sought to live as normal and productive a life as possible.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2000
One slow summer day about two years ago, teen-ager Kate Mowery was lounging around the house, breezily flipping through a book on flight simulation. She scanned a chapter or two on ray-tracing. Perused some sections on techniques for graphically rendering three-dimensional objects. Something was puzzling Mowery. Why weren't the methods used to render opaque spheres undergoing constant rotation around a fixed axis near a fixed light source as efficient or as accurate as they could be?
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1998
If it seems the word processors and other software programs on your computer are eating up more memory and taking longer to run, Alan Kay feels your pain.Kay is a legend in the computer industry, a digital-age Benjamin Franklin widely recognized as the father of the personal computer. He has been involved with nearly every key innovation in the history of modern computing, from laser printers to the Internet.Yesterday, Kay came to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to give the keynote address at a conference called "Bridging the Gap: Practical Aspects of Object-Oriented Technology."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 1998
As any computer user knows, the best software upgrades are those that maintain all the qualities of the original product while .. adding some nifty new features. In a sense, it's like buying the same thing twice, except that it's better the second time around.That's pretty much the effect Garbage is going for with its sophomore release, "Version 2.0" (Almo Sounds 80018, arriving in stores today). Despite pre-release reports that made the project seem as problem-plagued as Windows '98, the album manages to make more of the same seem like an unusually good deal.
NEWS
January 12, 1993
Meeting of PACT! scheduled for todayPACT!, Parents and Children Talking, has scheduled a meeting from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. today at Burleigh Manor Middle School Medial Center, 4200 Centennial Lane, in Ellicott City.The program, a development of the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy, is designed to encourage parents to open the lines of communications with their children about human sexuality and teen pregnancy prevention.HCC to hold open house before nursing courseHoward Community College will hold an open house for registered and licensed practical nurses who are not working in the nursing profession at 7 p.m. Jan. 25 in the Lower Nursing Lounge.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | September 10, 1990
Geren Mortensen got into television production in the early 1960s, when bulky cameras handled less than gracefully and zooming in for a close-up meant physically moving equipment.After a brief promotional writing stint at WBAL and after 11 years producing Maryland Public Television shows like "AM Weather" and "The Old House Works," Mortensen left television for a related line of work: producing video and audiovisual presentation systems for corporate clients.Much as the old television camera has become obsolete, the equipment with which the county businessman designs audiovisual centers for clients like Westinghouse, Fort Meade, The Naval Academy, National Geographic and Memorial Stadium bears little resemblance to the familiar classroom staple, the AV projector.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 18, 1997
Keith Huggins' former classmates at Liberty High School should not be surprised to find his name among the closing credits of the Hollywood movie "Dante's Peak."After all, they voted Huggins "Most Artistic" during their senior year in 1988.Huggins, 26, works as a digital artist for Digital Domain, a California company that created the computer graphics for "Dante's Peak," which, according to its distributor, Universal Pictures, scored the biggest opening in movie history on Feb 7.The Carroll native was among 100 artists who worked on the movie's post production, using graphics computers to create realistic effects for the fictitious Dante's Peak.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
Lockheed Martin Corp. has teamed with Intel Corp., the world's largest computer chip manufacturer, to develop high-quality, real-time, three-dimensional graphics for use in home computers, the companies announced yesterday.The new product, which is expected to be ready for the market in the second half of next year, is a less expensive version of the Lockheed Martin R3D/100 3-D computer board to be introduced later this year.The R3D/100 computer board is designed for architects and professional computer graphic design companies, said Carlton Caldwell, a spokesman for Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin.
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