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BUSINESS
By Richard Burnett and Richard Burnett,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 27, 2004
Exploiting terrorism jitters and Patriot Act phobias, the nation's latest e-mail scam has set off an international computer fraud investigation, federal authorities said yesterday. The bogus e-mail, which first arrived in computers several days ago, claimed to notify recipients that U.S. banking regulators had suspended the insurance on their bank accounts "due to suspected violations of the Patriot Act." Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge advised the action, the e-mail said. It directed people to a government "IDVerify" site where they could provide the necessary personal data, which would be checked with government records.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 27, 2008
LOS ANGELES - A federal jury handed down yesterday what legal experts said was the country's first cyberbullying verdict, convicting a Missouri woman of three misdemeanor charges of computer fraud for her involvement in creating a phony account on MySpace to trick a teenager, who later committed suicide. The jury deadlocked on a fourth count of conspiracy against Lori Drew, 49, and U.S. District Judge George Wu declared a mistrial on that charge. While it was unclear how severely Drew will be punished - the jury reduced the charges to misdemeanors from felonies, and no sentencing date was set - the conviction was highly significant, computer fraud experts said, because it was the first time that a federal statute designed to combat computer crimes was used to prosecute what were essentially abuses of a user agreement on a social networking site.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 27, 2008
LOS ANGELES - A federal jury handed down yesterday what legal experts said was the country's first cyberbullying verdict, convicting a Missouri woman of three misdemeanor charges of computer fraud for her involvement in creating a phony account on MySpace to trick a teenager, who later committed suicide. The jury deadlocked on a fourth count of conspiracy against Lori Drew, 49, and U.S. District Judge George Wu declared a mistrial on that charge. While it was unclear how severely Drew will be punished - the jury reduced the charges to misdemeanors from felonies, and no sentencing date was set - the conviction was highly significant, computer fraud experts said, because it was the first time that a federal statute designed to combat computer crimes was used to prosecute what were essentially abuses of a user agreement on a social networking site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Fuquay and Jim Fuquay,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 2004
In 1990, Robert Morris Jr. carved his name in cybercrime history when he became the first person prosecuted under the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. There haven't been a lot of others since. Professionals who follow the hazy world of computer viruses and worms bemoan that, but they also doubt it can be helped much. "Cybercrime is infinitely more difficult to prosecute than physical crime," said Matthew Yarbrough, a Dallas attorney who created the Cybercrimes Task Force at the Dallas U.S. attorney's office in 1997.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Computer files of private businesses, government agencies and universities appeared to gain broad new privacy protection yesterday as the Supreme Court refused to review the first case on data bank piracy.Without comment, the court turned aside an appeal by Robert T. Morris of Cambridge, Mass., the onetime Cornell University computer whiz who became the first individual convicted of the federal crime of computer fraud.Morris, who said that he meant to do no harm in 1988 when he sent a computer "worm" through electronic networks nationwide, causing many systems to "crash," had urged the court to limit the scope of the 1986 law he broke.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1995
Bell Atlantic promotes BartlettPhiladelphia-based Bell Atlantic Corp. yesterday named Thomas Bartlett president and chief executive of its Bell Atlantic International Wireless division.Mr. Bartlett, 37, replaces Benjamin Scott, who recently became president and chief executive of Dallas-based PCS PrimeCo LP, a wireless telephone venture of Bell Atlantic, Nynex Corp., U S West Inc. and AirTouch Communications Inc.Mr. Bartlett previously was president of the New England and upstate New York region of Bell Atlantic Nynex Mobile, the cellular joint venture formed between the two Baby Bells in July.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | June 11, 1991
Computer hacker Leonard Rose Jr., 32, of Middletown, has been sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison and three years of probation afterward for sending stolen UNIX source code to another hacker in Illinois in a case that is part of continuing government crackdown on computer crimes.Rose, once a member of a nationwide hackers' group called the Legion of Doom, pleaded guilty in March to two counts of wire fraud.His case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and a state case in Illinois that was transferred here were connected to the illegal exchange of the UNIX source code owned by Atlantic Telephone & Telegraph Co. and Bell Laboratories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Fuquay and Jim Fuquay,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 2004
In 1990, Robert Morris Jr. carved his name in cybercrime history when he became the first person prosecuted under the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. There haven't been a lot of others since. Professionals who follow the hazy world of computer viruses and worms bemoan that, but they also doubt it can be helped much. "Cybercrime is infinitely more difficult to prosecute than physical crime," said Matthew Yarbrough, a Dallas attorney who created the Cybercrimes Task Force at the Dallas U.S. attorney's office in 1997.
NEWS
November 27, 1991
On Friday night, the BPOE 2266 Elks Lodge of Glen Burnie honored Detective Richard F. Robinson of the Western District as one of two Policemen of the Year.Robinson's area of responsibility is Severn andGlen Burnie.Robinson joined the Anne Arundel County Police Department in September 1976 as a cadet. In January 1979, he became a police officer.He has been assigned to uniformed patrol, the narcotics section and, currently, the Western District Team Police.Robinson has cleared many cases and recovered thousands of dollars in stolen property.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
ATLANTA - EarthLink Inc., the fourth-largest U.S. Internet service provider, said yesterday that two Florida men it sued have agreed to stop sending customers unwanted e-mail. EarthLink said Damon DeCrescenzo and David Burstyn, two of 16 defendants in the company's lawsuit filed in Atlanta last year, agreed not to send unsolicited commercial e-mail and to pay an undisclosed settlement. Spokeswoman Carla Shaw said the suit against the other defendants will go on. EarthLink last year sued a group of individuals and companies it called the "Alabama Spammers" last year, accusing them of sending more than 250 million pieces of illegal commercial e-mail, or "spam," to promote herbal supplements and impotence drugs.
BUSINESS
By Richard Burnett and Richard Burnett,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 27, 2004
Exploiting terrorism jitters and Patriot Act phobias, the nation's latest e-mail scam has set off an international computer fraud investigation, federal authorities said yesterday. The bogus e-mail, which first arrived in computers several days ago, claimed to notify recipients that U.S. banking regulators had suspended the insurance on their bank accounts "due to suspected violations of the Patriot Act." Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge advised the action, the e-mail said. It directed people to a government "IDVerify" site where they could provide the necessary personal data, which would be checked with government records.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1995
Bell Atlantic promotes BartlettPhiladelphia-based Bell Atlantic Corp. yesterday named Thomas Bartlett president and chief executive of its Bell Atlantic International Wireless division.Mr. Bartlett, 37, replaces Benjamin Scott, who recently became president and chief executive of Dallas-based PCS PrimeCo LP, a wireless telephone venture of Bell Atlantic, Nynex Corp., U S West Inc. and AirTouch Communications Inc.Mr. Bartlett previously was president of the New England and upstate New York region of Bell Atlantic Nynex Mobile, the cellular joint venture formed between the two Baby Bells in July.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Computer files of private businesses, government agencies and universities appeared to gain broad new privacy protection yesterday as the Supreme Court refused to review the first case on data bank piracy.Without comment, the court turned aside an appeal by Robert T. Morris of Cambridge, Mass., the onetime Cornell University computer whiz who became the first individual convicted of the federal crime of computer fraud.Morris, who said that he meant to do no harm in 1988 when he sent a computer "worm" through electronic networks nationwide, causing many systems to "crash," had urged the court to limit the scope of the 1986 law he broke.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | June 11, 1991
Computer hacker Leonard Rose Jr., 32, of Middletown, has been sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison and three years of probation afterward for sending stolen UNIX source code to another hacker in Illinois in a case that is part of continuing government crackdown on computer crimes.Rose, once a member of a nationwide hackers' group called the Legion of Doom, pleaded guilty in March to two counts of wire fraud.His case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and a state case in Illinois that was transferred here were connected to the illegal exchange of the UNIX source code owned by Atlantic Telephone & Telegraph Co. and Bell Laboratories.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
WOODENSBURG - Twenty-six state investigators peered intently at their laptops on a recent weekday, searching for clues in the murder of a woman.The victim's husband had returned home from a meeting to find his wife dead and his home ransacked.The investigators had one clue, a computer found at the murder scene, and a one-hour deadline to retrieve evidence from the hard drive.It wasn't going to be easy. It wasn't meant to be.The murder investigation was a test for the investigators, who had spent the week attending the National White Collar Crime Center's Cybercop 101 class.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Complaints by former Perot volunteers that their credit files have been improperly checked have led one large credit agency to ask the Secret Service and the U.S. attorney's office in Georgia to investigate possible computer fraud and abuse.A spokeswoman for Equifax Inc., a large credit-reporting agency based in Atlanta, said yesterday that its consumer files may have been broken into by unauthorized personnel using the confidential member number and security access code belonging to one of its customers.
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