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By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1996
When Rockville-based Axent Technologies went public in April, investors drove up it's stock price 34 percent, to $18.75 from $14, in the first day's trading. That roar of support made Axent one of the hottest traded stocks in the U.S. that day.So far, Wall Street's swooning hasn't waned for Maryland's newest publicly held company, which raised $36 million in the IPO. Axent's stock has risen as high as $21.75 since the April 24 public offering.What's all the fuss about?After all, Axent is a young company that posted a loss last year.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | December 5, 2013
Online television service Aereo Inc. plans to expand to the Baltimore area starting Dec. 16, offering monthly subscriptions starting at $8 for viewing or recording live television on smart phones, tablets and laptops, the Long Island City-based company said Thursday. The technology, which converts TV broadcast signals into computer data sent over the Internet, will be available to more than 2.7 million consumers in Baltimore city and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne's and Talbot counties.
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NEWS
November 8, 1999
AFTER years of delay by Congress, President Clinton is taking a necessary first step to protect the privacy of medical records.The proposed regulations would restrict doctors, hospitals and health plans from using and transferring electronic medical data for purposes other than treatment or payment.Current federal law permits the exchange of this confidential information -- without patient consent -- among doctors, pharmaceutical companies, employers, the credit industry, insurance firms and telemarketers.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Like her colleagues at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Tiffany House packed up her desk last week hoping the government shutdown would last only a few days. But the single mom from Hyattsville will be in a position different from her co-workers when the agency reopens. Because House works for NOAA through a private contractor, she isn't likely to receive retroactive pay. As Congress considers legislation to provide back pay to an estimated 800,000 furloughed federal workers , far less attention has been paid to contract employees - many of whom work side by side with their agency counterparts.
BUSINESS
By States News | July 15, 1991
Federal Contracts Report is a weekly summary of selected contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in the Baltimore area through July 10.* Guardian Moving & Storage Co. Inc. of Baltimore won a $293,000 contract from the Army to provide packaging, crating and moving of household goods.* Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group of Baltimore won a $142,083 contract from the U.S.Postal Service headquarters to provide remote computer readings.* Viereck Co. of Columbia won a $117,000 contract from the Air Force to provide comparator electronic gauges.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
Darren Elliott had a problem.He'd researched his topic for months -- whether the United Nations should impose sanctions on countries that violate human rights. But when an opposing team brought up the plight of the Australian aborigines, he was at a loss.In the midst of the largest college debate tournament in the United States, with Towson State University as host, Mr. Elliott didn't have time to run to a library. So he did the next best thing -- he signed onto an electronic data base with his team's laptop computer.
NEWS
June 10, 1995
SCIENTIST Clifford Stoll, who gained fame as a tracker of international computer spies, offers some ominous warnings about the computer age faith and its technocratic promise of a better life along the information highway.The repentant ex-cybernaut now preaches that the computer can enslave and debase learning, rather than liberating and expanding the knowledge data base. In his new book, "Silicon Snake Oil," he praises the methods and media of traditional learning and thinking."Simply by turning to a computer when confronted with a problem, you limit your ability to recognize other solutions," Mr. Stoll warns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2004
Statistics show that the theft of portable computers continues to be on the rise. And while that might not be so surprising, what might cock an eyebrow is learning that it's not the loss of the equipment itself that is of major concern. Oh sure, the computer has some value, and loss because of its theft is part of the problem. But the real value of these stolen computers lies within the data they contain. The costs associated with the theft of computer data are literally hundreds if not thousands of times more valuable.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | April 6, 1991
A Baltimore jury awarded $1 million yesterday to a former University of Maryland scientist after concluding that two colleagues falsely accused him of stealing computer data from a Baltimore laboratory in 1988.The Circuit Court jury, after hearing three weeks of testimony, decided that the allegations by Anthony Sestokis and Philip J. Krause led to the false arrest of Robert W. Thatcher, the former head of the Applied Neuroscience Institute at the university's Eastern Shore campus. The three men worked together at a special clinical service that Mr. Thatcher helped to establish at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | December 5, 2013
Online television service Aereo Inc. plans to expand to the Baltimore area starting Dec. 16, offering monthly subscriptions starting at $8 for viewing or recording live television on smart phones, tablets and laptops, the Long Island City-based company said Thursday. The technology, which converts TV broadcast signals into computer data sent over the Internet, will be available to more than 2.7 million consumers in Baltimore city and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne's and Talbot counties.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
When he saw weekend news reports that a computer containing the personal records of 5,783 cancer patients had been stolen from Johns Hopkins Hospital, attorney Michael Mastracci knew exactly where to find it. "I knew about it weeks ago," he said of the computer. "Before I saw the news, I didn't know what was on the computer. But when I saw the stories, I knew immediately that that was the computer I'd heard about. " By early Sunday afternoon, he had arranged to have the computer brought to his Catonsville law office.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | July 28, 2007
Before most city workers had reached their offices one recent morning, Amy Hess and Mary Ellen Chambers stood in front of a strip of trees on Calvert Street, ready to survey them -- the 2007 way. With hand-held computers and an assortment of field guides, they gathered such information as the trees' size, species and whether they have dead branches -- a high-tech way to help move Baltimore toward its seemingly low-tech goal of doubling the number of...
BUSINESS
By The Dallas Morning News | January 4, 2007
DALLAS -- If you got a digital camera or an MP3 player from Santa, you're going to be dealing with a lot of new files on your computer. It's time to figure out how to make sure those files are safe. Hard-drive crashes have taught many computer users to back up their data to a blank CD or DVD. Others use an external hard drive. But there are some problems with those techniques. A fire or flood could ruin those backup CDs. A thief could steal the external drive along with the computer. And as computer users put more digital media on their computers, they require more and more space for their backups, building up unwieldy stacks of CDs or buying bigger and bigger external drives.
NEWS
By JOHANNA NEUMAN and JOHANNA NEUMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal and local officials reported yesterday that they have recovered a laptop computer and external hard drive - stolen May 3 from the Maryland home of a Department of Veterans Affairs employee - that contained the Social Security numbers of more than 26 million veterans and their spouses. "A preliminary review of the equipment by computer forensic teams determined that the database remains intact and has not been accessed since it was stolen," the FBI said in a statement issued with the VA and the Montgomery County Police Department.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
Carroll Area Transit System, the county's public transportation service, will add another bus to its fleet of 35, upgrade its computer system and begin installing mobile data terminals in all its vehicles. The county commissioners approved slightly more than $1 million in operating and capital expenses yesterday for the system that provided 164,442 rides within the county last year. The private, nonprofit transit company offers ride services at reduced rates to the elderly, disabled and needy on weekdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2004
Statistics show that the theft of portable computers continues to be on the rise. And while that might not be so surprising, what might cock an eyebrow is learning that it's not the loss of the equipment itself that is of major concern. Oh sure, the computer has some value, and loss because of its theft is part of the problem. But the real value of these stolen computers lies within the data they contain. The costs associated with the theft of computer data are literally hundreds if not thousands of times more valuable.
NEWS
May 27, 1992
The Cold War is over. It is time U.S. security agencies figured out what that means: no further excuses for holding back technological advance. But that is unlikely without a push from the Congress. In a struggle reminiscent of the FBI's attempt to control emerging telephone technology, the National Security Agency is fighting to keep in place Cold War restrictions on data security.We've been over this ground before. In 1976, researchers in an esoteric branch of mathematics called cryptology invented a new way to "encrypt" computer data.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 30, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- Two earthquake experts have proposed that residents of the San Francisco Bay area be asked to participate in a huge quake-detection network, using personal computers hooked up to backyard measuring devices."
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 21, 2003
WHAT'S THE WORST way to protect your PC from a worm that's spreading across the Internet? How about this: Cut off the electricity and don't turn it back on for a couple of days. That unlikely double-whammy hit millions of computer users Aug. 14, when the Blackout of 2003 wrapped the Northeast in a hot, sticky blanket of darkness. Suddenly, the possibility of contracting the MSBlast worm seemed insignificant compared with a world without power to run computers, elevators, air conditioners, subways, television sets, cell phone towers, gas pumps and other devices that lives and livelihoods depend on. The utilities and transmission line operators who run the Northeast grid will be pointing fingers for a long time, trying to figure out who knew what when and whether anything could have prevented the cascade of failures that left almost a fifth of the nation's population without electricity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | September 10, 2001
MY OLD FRIEND Dudley is an accomplished lawyer, gourmet cook, world traveler, raconteur and an enthusiastic, if not technically oriented computer user. He also tries to solve problems himself before he seeks help, so when he asks a question, I take it seriously. "I'd appreciate it if someone would demystify the ports on a computer," he wrote recently. "Why the differences? What do the differences mean? How do you identify which types you have and what do you want for each type of add-on device?
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