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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
A former worker at a Canton high-tech firm was arrested yesterday by federal agents who said the disgruntled ex-employee used his inside knowledge to cripple the company's computer network, costing the business thousands of dollars. The case against Scott W. Rogers, 42, of Columbia marks the first time federal authorities in Baltimore have pursued charges of computer intrusion, which investigators describe as a problem that has rapidly expanded beyond the realm of teen-age hackers. "We've seen a dramatic rise in the number of investigations we've opened nationwide," said Special Agent Shawn Henry, supervisor of the FBI Baltimore field office's new computer crime squad.
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BUSINESS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
A former worker at a Canton high-tech firm was arrested yesterday by federal agents who said the disgruntled ex-employee used his inside knowledge to cripple the company's computer network, costing the business thousands of dollars. The case against Scott W. Rogers, 42, of Columbia marks the first time federal authorities in Baltimore have pursued charges of computer intrusion, which investigators describe as a problem that has rapidly expanded beyond the realm of teen-age hackers. "We've seen a dramatic rise in the number of investigations we've opened nationwide," said Special Agent Shawn Henry, supervisor of the FBI Baltimore field office's new computer crime squad.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
For the Baltimore County Police Department's computer crime- fighters, happiness is a smoking hard disk.While detectives often chase garden-variety criminals, cybergumshoes Sandra B. Mapstone and Roland M. Lascola match wits with hackers, phone freaks, forgers, kiddie pornographers and disgruntled employees who use computers to steal or destroy.They crack pass codes, trace system invaders and retrieve information hidden carefully on the disk drives of criminals who think their work will go undetected.
NEWS
July 23, 1998
A CECIL County man was sentenced in federal court last week to a paltry 10 months for electronic credit and debit fraud, a crime of which Americans are increasingly and justifiably fearful.In an elaborate scheme, Joseph Barcase, 49, used a high-powered camera and an "encoder" to steal people's ATM personal identification numbers and credit information. He bilked them of $74,000 and almost got away with it.His punishment -- five months in a halfway house, five months of home detention and a $1,000 fine -- is disturbingly light for a premeditated crime with such serious implications for victims.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
WOODENSBURG - Twenty-six state investigators peered intently at their laptops on a recent weekday, searching for clues in the murder of a woman.The victim's husband had returned home from a meeting to find his wife dead and his home ransacked.The investigators had one clue, a computer found at the murder scene, and a one-hour deadline to retrieve evidence from the hard drive.It wasn't going to be easy. It wasn't meant to be.The murder investigation was a test for the investigators, who had spent the week attending the National White Collar Crime Center's Cybercop 101 class.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
Cyber-crime may be more pervasive than many people thought.A study by a year-old Baltimore research and consulting firm says 58 percent of the 205 companies surveyed, mostly Fortune 1,000 firms, had had outsiders try to misuse their computer systems during the past year, frequently costing companies more than $1 million to fix.Of companies that had detected hackers trying to get into their ** systems, 82 percent said at least one intruder got in from the...
NEWS
July 23, 1998
A CECIL County man was sentenced in federal court last week to a paltry 10 months for electronic credit and debit fraud, a crime of which Americans are increasingly and justifiably fearful.In an elaborate scheme, Joseph Barcase, 49, used a high-powered camera and an "encoder" to steal people's ATM personal identification numbers and credit information. He bilked them of $74,000 and almost got away with it.His punishment -- five months in a halfway house, five months of home detention and a $1,000 fine -- is disturbingly light for a premeditated crime with such serious implications for victims.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 19, 1998
BOSTON -- A Massachusetts teen-ager has pleaded guilty to invading a telephone company computer last winter, knocking out communications to the tower at Worcester Regional Airport, and cutting phone service to hundreds of residents in a nearby town.The youth, whose name and age are being withheld under federal law, was the first juvenile ever charged by the federal government with a computer crime, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Boston, which announced the charges and plea agreement yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
A 42-year-old Columbia man who helped create the computer network used by a Canton high-tech firm admitted in federal court yesterday to damaging the network a few months after he was fired. Scott W. Rogers, a former software engineer for SkyNetWEB, pleaded guilty before Senior Judge Herbert N. Maletz, in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, to intentionally damaging the software used by the Web-hosting firm. Rogers, who was fired from SkyNetWEB in February, admitted he infiltrated the company's network twice in May without authorization and shut down access to at least one of its customers, according to a plea agreement submitted to Maletz yesterday by First Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Welsh.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
While Baltimore County officials were searching in October for a 49-year-old, Harvard-educated composer charged with abducting his children, Deputy State's Attorney Howard Merker did something he had never done before. He sent the fugitive an e-mail.While he was moving around the country with his two daughters, Christopher Yavelow, who grew up in Towson, replied three times, communicating online with Merker about his legal rights. At the same time, law enforcement authorities were tracking Yavelow's e-mails to his estranged wife and to his mother in Timonium.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1997
WOODENSBURG - Twenty-six state investigators peered intently at their laptops on a recent weekday, searching for clues in the murder of a woman.The victim's husband had returned home from a meeting to find his wife dead and his home ransacked.The investigators had one clue, a computer found at the murder scene, and a one-hour deadline to retrieve evidence from the hard drive.It wasn't going to be easy. It wasn't meant to be.The murder investigation was a test for the investigators, who had spent the week attending the National White Collar Crime Center's Cybercop 101 class.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
Cyber-crime may be more pervasive than many people thought.A study by a year-old Baltimore research and consulting firm says 58 percent of the 205 companies surveyed, mostly Fortune 1,000 firms, had had outsiders try to misuse their computer systems during the past year, frequently costing companies more than $1 million to fix.Of companies that had detected hackers trying to get into their ** systems, 82 percent said at least one intruder got in from the...
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
For the Baltimore County Police Department's computer crime- fighters, happiness is a smoking hard disk.While detectives often chase garden-variety criminals, cybergumshoes Sandra B. Mapstone and Roland M. Lascola match wits with hackers, phone freaks, forgers, kiddie pornographers and disgruntled employees who use computers to steal or destroy.They crack pass codes, trace system invaders and retrieve information hidden carefully on the disk drives of criminals who think their work will go undetected.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday that his budget proposal for the state police would boost the number of new troopers -- and, in turn, beef up units to fight illegal gun trafficking, computer crime and auto theft.Glendening, who had previously said he would include a 10 percent raise for state troopers in the budget submitted to legislators next month, outlined his priorities for troopers at a swearing-in ceremony for 55 graduates of the agency's training academy. Under his proposal, 75 trooper candidates would enter the academy next month, and another class of 75 would enter in July.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
Bank names Goldstein to two positionsMichael L. Goldstein was recently named assistant vice president and commercial lending officer at Taneytown Bank & Trust Co.Mr. Goldstein will be responsible for small-business and middle-market lending in Carroll and Northwest Baltimore counties.Before joining Taneytown bank, he worked for Signet Bank/Union Trust Co. in Baltimore.He traveled to Sacramento, Calif., last year to work in the Small Business Disaster Assistance Program, helping businesses hurt by the earthquake in September.
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