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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
State attorneys general in Maryland and 32 other states have reached a $173 million settlement with six computer chip manufacturers who were accused in antitrust lawsuits of conspiring to raise prices on their products. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said the settlement with Micron Technology In, NEC Electronics America Inc., Infineon Technologies, Hynix Semiconductor, Elpida Memory Inc. and Mosel-Vitelic Corp. offers restitution for consumers and state and local government agencies that paid higher prices for computers and other electronics because of the alleged price fixing scheme.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
State attorneys general in Maryland and 32 other states have reached a $173 million settlement with six computer chip manufacturers who were accused in antitrust lawsuits of conspiring to raise prices on their products. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said the settlement with Micron Technology In, NEC Electronics America Inc., Infineon Technologies, Hynix Semiconductor, Elpida Memory Inc. and Mosel-Vitelic Corp. offers restitution for consumers and state and local government agencies that paid higher prices for computers and other electronics because of the alleged price fixing scheme.
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BUSINESS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1996
Tiny but mighty, the computer chip is changing the way the U.S. Army prepares to fight wars and is saving the government money at the same time, says the new commander of the Army's Test and Evaluation Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground.Eventually, anything from a pistol to a tank or missile could be developed and tested via computer simulation, said Maj. Gen. John E. Longhouser, 53, who took over in September as head of the 72,000-acre facility.This "virtual proving ground" is faster, more efficient and more cost-effective than the traditional method of build-and-test, said the 1965 graduate of West Point whose command, known as TECOM, includes nine Army test sites around the country, including APG.Eventually, it could mean fewer bangs and booms for those who live around APG as design and preliminary testing takes place in computers and as munitions go to the firing range only for final tests, the general said.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee,Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - - The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Intel Corp., accusing the computer chip giant of abusing its market dominance for a decade to stifle competition and strengthen its monopoly. The FTC alleges that Intel has waged a systematic and illegal campaign to shut out rival makers of central processing unit chips, the main brains of a computer, by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In doing so, the agency contends, the world's largest chipmaker has deprived consumers of choice by denying them access to potentially superior chips and lower prices.
FEATURES
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
With the Cold War warmed, the Soviet Union dismantled and KGB agents out of vogue (and out of jobs), moviemakers have replaced Russia -- and Nazis and mobsters, too -- with a more modern genre of big-screen evil: the techno-spy.And in its search for new varieties of wiretapping, computer-hacking bad guys, Hollywood has aimed its cameras at the National Security Agency, the nation's super-secret eavesdropping and code-breaking organization at Fort Meade.It began five years ago with the movie "Sneakers," in which Robert Redford's crew of computer hackers steals a code-cracking device that can break into any computer on Earth.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1993
Shipyard gets $27 million contractBethlehem Steel Corp.'s shipyard in Sparrows Point was awarded a $27 million contract yesterday by the U.S. Maritime Administration, according to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.Foreign chips in Japan declineU.S. and Japanese officials announced yesterday that the market share of imports in the Japanese computer chip market, a widely watched trade figure, had dropped again, to 19.2 percent in the second quarter.The lower market share for computer chip imports provoked immediate dismay from U.S. government and industry officials.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
The Maryland Transportation Authority will expand its electronic toll system to the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway early next year, officials said yesterday.Motorists who use the system, known as M-TAG, receive a small plastic box containing a computer chip, which is affixed to the windshield. The system, which deducts the toll electronically from the driver's prepaid account, helps reduce traffic jams because it permits motorists to pass through toll gates without stopping.M-TAG lanes can handle 1,100 vehicles an hour, compared with about 500 at traditional tollbooths handling cash or tickets.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 14, 1996
NEW YORK -- On a day when major indexes set records based on economic news, computer industry shares climbed yesterday as analysts raised their ratings on individual stocks and industry groups.Soundview Financial Group, known for its prescient analysis of the computer chip industry, said yesterday that "technology" shares could appreciate by 30 percent to 40 percent in the next four to five months.IBM got its boost from Merrill Lynch & Co., which raised its outlook to "buy" from "accumulate."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 29, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday after a profit warning from Cirrus Logic Inc. sent semiconductor and other computer issues lower. Expectations that short-term interest rates will fall helped bank shares gain for a third day.Cirrus Logic shares tumbled $7 to $19.88 after the computer chip maker trimmed its earnings forecast for the quarter ended Dec. 31, its second revision in two months. The warning fed concern that weakening sales will curb the computer industry's profit growth.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The White House is pressing for legislation to force telephone and cable television companies to install computer software on their networks that would enable law enforcement agencies to eavesdrop on phone calls and computer transmissions, Clinton administration officials said yesterday.The move, intended to preserve the law enforcement agencies' ability to conduct court-authorized wiretaps, is intended to overcome the difficulty of intercepting telephone conversations and other electronic transmissions in the on-off pulses of digital computer code, which is being used increasingly for everyday communications.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | December 2, 2006
This holiday season, the buzzword for hot toys is technology - from video consoles to digitized games to computerized stuffed toys. They're items that prompted gadget buffs to form long lines outside stores well before Thanksgiving. For some shoppers, that meant scant supply of items on Black Friday made for a bleak Friday. Such is the age of computerized entertainment, which has been steadily affecting the toy industry since the late 1990s. "What technology has done is change our idea of what is a toy," said Chris Byrne, analyst and co-editor of Toy Wishes magazine.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 11, 2005
SANTA CLARA, CALIF. -- Intel Corp., the world's biggest computer-chip maker, said yesterday that it plans to spend $25 billion buying back stock. That would be the second-largest share repurchase in the United States behind Microsoft Corp.'s record $30 billion buyback. At current prices, the buyback would amount to about 17 percent of the company's stock. Intel also said it will increase its dividend by 25 percent, to 10 cents a share. Intel and Microsoft, sitting on record piles of cash, are choosing to return money to shareholders rather than making acquisitions or investing in new ventures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Marvel and Bill Marvel,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2002
Once a year, Grandpa would get out the electric train. He'd lay the track in a circle around the tree, attach the wires and plug in the transformer. Then the train would take off like a jackrabbit, careering around the rails. The crossing gate would bob as the cars rolled by, and if it was a really advanced train set, the engine would whistle, sort of, and smoke would curl back from the stack. But they've been working on the railroad. Model railroads - please don't call them electric trains - have rolled into the age of the microprocessor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | October 15, 2000
You'd think the week you won the Nobel Prize would be a pretty good week. But you'd never guess it from talking to engineer Jack St. Clair Kilby. Forty-two years ago, Kilby had a flash of insight and came up with the idea for what engineers call the integrated circuit. Most of us today just call it the chip. It was something like inventing the atom. Today chips are the basic building blocks of just about every electronic device -- from cell phones to computers to cars to washing machines to Barbie.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Intel Corp., the world's largest chip maker, is no longer being investigated by the Federal Trade Commission for potential antitrust violations, the agency said yesterday. Intel said it received word in a letter from the FTC's Bureau of Competition that the 3-year investigation had been closed. FTC spokesman Mitch Katz confirmed that the commission has dropped its inquiry, marking the second time in the past decade that the agency has concluded an antitrust investigation of Intel's business conduct without taking action.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2000
His first foray into the computer chip market wasn't quite the success he'd hoped for. So now Walter Finkelstein is banking on a new strategy that takes him out of production and into design to put him in the black. After his former company ran out of money in 1997, Finkelstein regrouped, shifted his focus and formed NanoFab Inc., a fledgling Columbia company that makes a high-tech machines to aid chip design. Finkelstein, 59, has taken out loans and used his savings and those of his wife, Kay, to pay for his latest efforts.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | October 5, 1992
Computer chip is now a work of artIf Andy Warhol can make art out of Campbell's soup cans, why can't Intel Corp. make art out of microchips?Answer: It can.And already has. Intel and other major computer makers, including International Business Machines Corp., Hewlett-Packard Corp. and American Telephone & Telegraph Co., have computer chip diagrams -- in poster-sized blowups -- ++ on display at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington. The exhibit, the first to examine the computer chip as a work of art, includes 31 computer-generated diagrams of 22 microcircuits.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 4, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday, surrendering early gains, amid waning optimism that a budget agreement will be reached soon in Washington.Lower prices for computer chip, semiconductor equipment, computer and software shares added to the market's woes.Prices dropped late in the day in reaction to remarks by President Clinton that implied that there's no end in sight to the 19-day-old partial government shutdown.Led by Procter & Gamble Co., Westinghouse Electric Corp. and AT&T Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 14, 2000
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Intel Corp., the world's No. 1 computer-chip maker, said late yesterday that its fourth-quarter profit topped the highest forecasts as personal computer makers bought a record number of microprocessors and prices rose. Intel shares gained 6.5 percent to a record $97 in after-hours trading after the company said its net income, excluding acquisition expenses, increased 15 percent to $2.4 billion, or 69 cents a share, from $2.08 billion, or 60 cents a year earlier.
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