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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
The main attraction lately at art and print stores looks like a pastel portrait of bad TV reception.Yet, folks stop and stare at these fuzzy images. They step forward and furrow their brows; they step back, squat down, stand up. They look, then try not to look.A couple of Texans created these computer-generated prints and call them "Holusions," which, when viewed just the right way present the illusion of a scene in three dimensions. Without the use of 3-D.Available in Maryland since the spring, they could be the biggest optical phenomenon to hit the American shopping mall since Elvis sightings.
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By Shaun Borsh | December 11, 2012
The marriage of two disciplines, mathematics and art, may seem an unlikely union given an artist's innate desire for free expression. Meet Helaman Ferguson, whose sculpture is known for its root in mathematical design. Ferguson, of North Laurel, recently completed a massive undertaking: a 2 1/2-story, 9-plus ton bronze and granite sculpture, Umbilic Torus SC. Commissioned by the Simons Foundation, a private institution committed to the advancement of science and mathematics, the torus is being donated to Stony Brook University, in Long Island, N.Y. Ferguson, 72, who holds a doctorate in mathematics, designed umbilic torus, a three-dimensional doughnut-shaped figure with a single edge.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 12, 1995
We've probably all been to an art show or two where one of the works was on a computer. If so, you know the routine. You sit down in front of the screen, move the little "mouse" around until the arrow on the screen gets to the right position, press the clicker, and you're off on a journey the artist has created for you.It may involve video, still pictures, text, some combination thereof. Sometimes it's fun, sometimes it's instructive, sometimes it's a bore. But you usually take a shot at it, even if you don't follow it all the way through.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
EXPLORE
By Shaun Borsh | December 11, 2012
The marriage of two disciplines, mathematics and art, may seem an unlikely union given an artist's innate desire for free expression. Meet Helaman Ferguson, whose sculpture is known for its root in mathematical design. Ferguson, of North Laurel, recently completed a massive undertaking: a 2 1/2-story, 9-plus ton bronze and granite sculpture, Umbilic Torus SC. Commissioned by the Simons Foundation, a private institution committed to the advancement of science and mathematics, the torus is being donated to Stony Brook University, in Long Island, N.Y. Ferguson, 72, who holds a doctorate in mathematics, designed umbilic torus, a three-dimensional doughnut-shaped figure with a single edge.
FEATURES
By Sascha Segan and Sascha Segan,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
Poets and novelists turn words into pictures. But on the Internet, the world-spanning computer network, a group of people is taking this idea a bit further. They are ASCII artists, devoted to taking the characters found on a typewriter keyboard and drawing Winnie the Pooh, the Mona Lisa or Abraham Lincoln out of arrangements of letters and symbols.ASCII -- which stands for "American Standard Code for Information Interchange" is a set of 127 letters, numbers and symbols that all computers (and most typewriters)
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | October 6, 1991
The use of computer technology in art will be the focus of a joint exhibit opening Thursday at Maryland Art Place downtown and at the University of Maryland Baltimore County's Fine Arts Gallery."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Towson University graduate student Marcus Gates could turn his political science degree into a teaching certificate in high school social studies. Instead, he's set his sights on elementary school."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2004
Azure Dee Hedgecock and James Matthew Tremper were united in marriage on August 22, 2004 at the Cloisters Castle in Lutherville, Maryland. The bride, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Hedgecock and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Parks is pursuing her second degree in Nursing. The groom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tremper, is a graduate of Towson University with a degree in Computer Art and working as a Designer with his family's business. The newlyweds honeymooned in St. Croix and reside in Baltimore, Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Towson University graduate student Marcus Gates could turn his political science degree into a teaching certificate in high school social studies. Instead, he's set his sights on elementary school."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 12, 1995
We've probably all been to an art show or two where one of the works was on a computer. If so, you know the routine. You sit down in front of the screen, move the little "mouse" around until the arrow on the screen gets to the right position, press the clicker, and you're off on a journey the artist has created for you.It may involve video, still pictures, text, some combination thereof. Sometimes it's fun, sometimes it's instructive, sometimes it's a bore. But you usually take a shot at it, even if you don't follow it all the way through.
FEATURES
By Sascha Segan and Sascha Segan,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
Poets and novelists turn words into pictures. But on the Internet, the world-spanning computer network, a group of people is taking this idea a bit further. They are ASCII artists, devoted to taking the characters found on a typewriter keyboard and drawing Winnie the Pooh, the Mona Lisa or Abraham Lincoln out of arrangements of letters and symbols.ASCII -- which stands for "American Standard Code for Information Interchange" is a set of 127 letters, numbers and symbols that all computers (and most typewriters)
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | August 21, 1993
The main attraction lately at art and print stores looks like a pastel portrait of bad TV reception.Yet, folks stop and stare at these fuzzy images. They step forward and furrow their brows; they step back, squat down, stand up. They look, then try not to look.A couple of Texans created these computer-generated prints and call them "Holusions," which, when viewed just the right way present the illusion of a scene in three dimensions. Without the use of 3-D.Available in Maryland since the spring, they could be the biggest optical phenomenon to hit the American shopping mall since Elvis sightings.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | October 6, 1991
The use of computer technology in art will be the focus of a joint exhibit opening Thursday at Maryland Art Place downtown and at the University of Maryland Baltimore County's Fine Arts Gallery."
NEWS
By SHANON D. MURRAY and SHANON D. MURRAY,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Four students from Worthington Elementary School in Ellicott City won prizes in the Howard County schools' Computer Learning Month Contest.Christine Buchler won first place among first-graders; Allison Cappelaere, second place among second-graders; Carlena Mattiello, third place among third-graders; and Rebecca Hwang, first place among fourth-graders.Contest participants used computer-generated art to illustrate how computers can be useful and provide entertainment. The contest was open to all county elementary and middle school students.
NEWS
December 5, 2001
The student: Michele Helinski, 9 School: Atholton Elementary Special achievement: A member of her school's Young Authors' Club, Michele participated in Howard County's Young Authors Conference this year. Atholton Elementary published Michele's story Brittney Gets a Horse in the school publication A World of Writing. Also a visual artist, Michele earned first place in a computer art contest sponsored by the Maryland Instructional Computer Coordinators Association for her drawing of a Siamese cat. From "Brittney Gets a Horse": "The day came when the horse show finally arrived.
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