Advertisement
HomeCollectionsComputer Animation
IN THE NEWS

Computer Animation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 30, 1992
STEPHEN MORNINGSTAR, 15, son of Reuben "Spike" an Sharon Morningstar of Uniontown Road in Westminster.School: Freshman at Francis Scott Key High School.Honored for: Creating animated computer sequences for teachers to use to demonstrate lessons on such things as an internal combustion engine.Goals: To attend college and possibly pursue a career in computer-generated images for commercials.Comments: "I learned pretty much by reading about it [creating computer animation] in the book and by trial and error.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Co-directors Eric Darnell and Tom McGrath, over the phone from Los Angeles, react merrily to the notion that Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa is the Godfather Part II of computer-animated sequels. Speaking in one voice, they laugh when they say, "Great comparison!" Hey, I protest, I mean it. After all, like Godfather Part II, it's a sequel and a prequel about fathers and sons. It goes back in time to show the African roots of Alex (voice of Ben Stiller), the lion who considered himself the King of New York when he headlined the Central Park Zoo at the start of Madagascar.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2005
LOOK FOR FULL REVIEWS IN TOMORROW'S MOVIES TODAY SECTION Chicken Little This latest animated effort from Disney, the first since the studio abandoned traditional in favor of computer animation, is the tale of a socially outcast chicken with a credibility problem - no one, not even his dad, believes him when he insists the sky is falling. G. Jarhead Sam Mendes (American Beauty) directs Jake Gyllenhaal as a Marine serving in the Mideast during the first war with Iraq. R. MirrorMask A young girl searches for a mask that will show her the way home in this fantasy written by famed DC Comics storyteller Neil Gaiman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2005
LOOK FOR FULL REVIEWS IN TOMORROW'S MOVIES TODAY SECTION Chicken Little This latest animated effort from Disney, the first since the studio abandoned traditional in favor of computer animation, is the tale of a socially outcast chicken with a credibility problem - no one, not even his dad, believes him when he insists the sky is falling. G. Jarhead Sam Mendes (American Beauty) directs Jake Gyllenhaal as a Marine serving in the Mideast during the first war with Iraq. R. MirrorMask A young girl searches for a mask that will show her the way home in this fantasy written by famed DC Comics storyteller Neil Gaiman.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1998
Special-effects master Ken Maruyama stands in front of a projection screen and points enthusiastically. On the screen, actor Will Smith rides an alien, much like a cowboy breaking in a wild horse. It's a scene from the 1997 blockbuster movie "Men In Black."Only on this screen, the alien is a tame-looking piece of nondescript foam that wouldn't scare a baby. Click. Another slide. Now, Smith's foam animal looks like the living, breathing, scary monster that thrilled millions of moviegoers.Maruyama explains that it was created by the "magic" of computers, which have catapulted movie special effects to heights that were barely imagined decades ago.Monsters.
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - Fresh off its blockbuster Shrek 2, DreamWorks now begins playing to a whole new audience - Wall Street investors anxious to see whether its new film Shark Tale sinks or swims. The computer-animated movie about a vegetarian shark and a fast-talking tropical fish opened in theaters yesterday just as DreamWorks is poised to spin off its computer animation unit. Although DreamWorks hit pay dirt with two Shrek films, the initial public stock offering has the studio under pressure to show it's no one-trick pony - or, in its case, donkey.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 29, 2002
Call it cockiness. Conceit. Or maybe just plain naivete. But it's what gives producer Jeffrey Katzenberg the confidence to repeatedly take movie animation where others haven't - but where he's sure audiences will follow. The DreamWorks co-founder, fresh off a Best Animated Feature Oscar for Shrek, is trusting that gambler's luck will remain with him for Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, a combination of traditional two-dimensional and computer-generated three-dimensional animation he believes represents the new frontier for film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 4, 1999
The Matrix," a cautionary tale about what happens when the machines take over, promises a movie experience like no other. It's a claim the film lives up to, thanks in large part to special effects that enable bullets to stop in midair, combatants to defy gravity and kung-fu kicks to be delivered with lightning speed and precision (by someone who's not Jackie Chan). But "The Matrix" isn't the first film to promise the never-before-experienced. Here are a half-dozen others that lived up to their advance billing.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 24, 2002
Cross Walt Disney with John Ford and you'd get Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron. Except those two master filmmakers would come up with a far more engaging film than this gorgeous, but otherwise nondescript, horse opera. DreamWorks has positioned Spirit as the film that will save traditional animation as we've known it - no small task, given that all the great crowd-pleasers of the past six years or so (Toy Story, Shrek, Monsters Inc., etc.) have relied on computer animation to tell their stories, while films drawn by hand (Hercules, Atlantis, El Dorado)
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Co-directors Eric Darnell and Tom McGrath, over the phone from Los Angeles, react merrily to the notion that Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa is the Godfather Part II of computer-animated sequels. Speaking in one voice, they laugh when they say, "Great comparison!" Hey, I protest, I mean it. After all, like Godfather Part II, it's a sequel and a prequel about fathers and sons. It goes back in time to show the African roots of Alex (voice of Ben Stiller), the lion who considered himself the King of New York when he headlined the Central Park Zoo at the start of Madagascar.
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - Fresh off its blockbuster Shrek 2, DreamWorks now begins playing to a whole new audience - Wall Street investors anxious to see whether its new film Shark Tale sinks or swims. The computer-animated movie about a vegetarian shark and a fast-talking tropical fish opened in theaters yesterday just as DreamWorks is poised to spin off its computer animation unit. Although DreamWorks hit pay dirt with two Shrek films, the initial public stock offering has the studio under pressure to show it's no one-trick pony - or, in its case, donkey.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 29, 2002
Call it cockiness. Conceit. Or maybe just plain naivete. But it's what gives producer Jeffrey Katzenberg the confidence to repeatedly take movie animation where others haven't - but where he's sure audiences will follow. The DreamWorks co-founder, fresh off a Best Animated Feature Oscar for Shrek, is trusting that gambler's luck will remain with him for Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, a combination of traditional two-dimensional and computer-generated three-dimensional animation he believes represents the new frontier for film.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 24, 2002
Cross Walt Disney with John Ford and you'd get Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron. Except those two master filmmakers would come up with a far more engaging film than this gorgeous, but otherwise nondescript, horse opera. DreamWorks has positioned Spirit as the film that will save traditional animation as we've known it - no small task, given that all the great crowd-pleasers of the past six years or so (Toy Story, Shrek, Monsters Inc., etc.) have relied on computer animation to tell their stories, while films drawn by hand (Hercules, Atlantis, El Dorado)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 4, 1999
The Matrix," a cautionary tale about what happens when the machines take over, promises a movie experience like no other. It's a claim the film lives up to, thanks in large part to special effects that enable bullets to stop in midair, combatants to defy gravity and kung-fu kicks to be delivered with lightning speed and precision (by someone who's not Jackie Chan). But "The Matrix" isn't the first film to promise the never-before-experienced. Here are a half-dozen others that lived up to their advance billing.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1998
Special-effects master Ken Maruyama stands in front of a projection screen and points enthusiastically. On the screen, actor Will Smith rides an alien, much like a cowboy breaking in a wild horse. It's a scene from the 1997 blockbuster movie "Men In Black."Only on this screen, the alien is a tame-looking piece of nondescript foam that wouldn't scare a baby. Click. Another slide. Now, Smith's foam animal looks like the living, breathing, scary monster that thrilled millions of moviegoers.Maruyama explains that it was created by the "magic" of computers, which have catapulted movie special effects to heights that were barely imagined decades ago.Monsters.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 1997
STUARTS DRAFT, Va. - With the sun high over the Blue Ridge Mountains, Lloyd Lee McPherson wiped the August sweat from his brow and explained why computers monitor the sexual urges of every cow on his Shenandoah Valley dairy farm.To continuously produce milk, a cow has to give birth to a calf every year, allowed McPherson, a third-generation farmer. Pregnancy comes through artificial insemination and bull semen costs about $20 a shot. So it's important to know just when a milk cow is ovulating.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | July 13, 1992
On New Year's Eve in 1986, a disgruntled employee set fire to the Dupont Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The fire engulfed the hotel, killing 97 people.That tragedy captured headlines around the world -- and sparked a series of lawsuits, including one claiming several people died when portable stage equipment collapsed amid the flames. The class-action suit sought $10 million in damages from the equipment manufacturer.The manufacturer didn't believe its product, which had been stored in the hotel ballroom, was at fault.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1995
For many adults, toys are just overpriced plastic things they consider buying only when their children begin to vigorously test their diaphragm capacity in a department store.But few adults pay as much attention to toys as John Lasseter.In Mr. Lasseter's office at Pixar Animation Studios in Richmond, Calif., toys line the shelves, and many of them were there long before he began work five years ago on "Toy Story," the first fully computer-animated feature. "The main reason to do this film," says Mr. Lasseter, "was so during work hours, I could go to a toy store and buy toys on the company credit card."
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1995
For many adults, toys are just overpriced plastic things they consider buying only when their children begin to vigorously test their diaphragm capacity in a department store.But few adults pay as much attention to toys as John Lasseter.In Mr. Lasseter's office at Pixar Animation Studios in Richmond, Calif., toys line the shelves, and many of them were there long before he began work five years ago on "Toy Story," the first fully computer-animated feature. "The main reason to do this film," says Mr. Lasseter, "was so during work hours, I could go to a toy store and buy toys on the company credit card."
NEWS
November 30, 1992
STEPHEN MORNINGSTAR, 15, son of Reuben "Spike" an Sharon Morningstar of Uniontown Road in Westminster.School: Freshman at Francis Scott Key High School.Honored for: Creating animated computer sequences for teachers to use to demonstrate lessons on such things as an internal combustion engine.Goals: To attend college and possibly pursue a career in computer-generated images for commercials.Comments: "I learned pretty much by reading about it [creating computer animation] in the book and by trial and error.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.