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March 6, 2013
The Churchville Lions presented a computer, complete with JAWS software, to Tatyanna Ditzenberger. JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is a computer screen reader program for Microsoft Windows that allows blind and visually impaired users to read the screen with a text-to-speech output. Tatyanna and her teacher, Karen Karnes, demonstrate its use by making "Thank You Lions" appear on the screen.
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BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By James M. Purtilo | July 17, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleycorrectly flags STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - as critical economic enablers, and an administrative priority. Thus, it was good news when Towson University recently won a $2 million grant to study science instruction. They'll find better ways to teach traditional sciences, just asUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore County leads the nation with teaching mathematics. Unfortunately, the future is not bright for one key STEM area: computer science.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
He didn't even finish his degree at the University of Maryland, College Park, but entrepreneur Brendan Iribe found other creative geniuses and best friends as he tinkered in the computer science department there. So on Friday, he will give the university $31 million - the largest gift the university has ever received - to build a new computer science building with a focus on virtual reality. "It is transformational for our university and our college. What Brendan Iribe is doing is creating a center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Alexander A. Kamantauskas, a computer network engineer and Civil War buff who enjoyed giving highly detailed battlefield tours to family and friends, died May 15 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 45. "Alex knew something about everything, but he was very humble. He was a happy and friendly person who always made friends easily," said Steve Balbach, a longtime friend and a computer engineer who lives in Ashton in Montgomery County. The son of Social Security Administration workers, Alexander Antony Kamantauskas was born in Catonsville and raised in Columbia.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2011
Towson University today premiered a computer-generated flythrough tour of its planned athletics facility on TigerArena.com . The video was produced by a Boston and New York-based creative agency called Neoscape. "The video is incredible," Towson athletics director Mike Waddell said in a news release. "It lets you use your imagination and puts right in the middle of the new arena even though it is still just a drawing on the board right now. We were very fortunate to have had one of the industry's top agencies, Neoscape, involved in its production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996
An artistic vision as translated by computers is featured at the Finer Side Galleries' first exhibit of the season in Salisbury.Bloomsburg University professor Gary Clark, whose work has been widely exhibited, creates landscapes derived from fractal geometry, digital photography, drawing and computer tinkering in "Analog Memories, Digital Visions." The show runs in conjunction with a members' showcase exhibition by the Salisbury Alternative Space Co-op.The Finer Side Galleries' address is 205 W. Main St., Salisbury.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | February 26, 1995
In the half-century since World War II, the suburbanization of America has made us automobile addicts. Computers can't break that habit. But they can ease the dependence, along with the pain automobiles inflict on society.From polluted air, to time wasted in traffic jams, to the tax money needed to build and maintain vast highway systems, the mobility cars offer to Americans comes at an increasingly high price.Several trends are now combining to present some handy, high-tech solutions. One of these solutions -- telecommuting -- will be the subject of a Thursday session at the Maryland Information Technology Expo and Conference at the Baltimore Convention Center this week.
NEWS
November 28, 1994
The Baltimore City Police Department will take another giant step into the computer age next fall with sophisticated equipment that will enable officers to tap into a wide variety of data bases from their patrol cars. The idea is not new; many police departments have had some form of portable computer in their radio cars for years. But these, according to police officials, are supposed to provide more information for officers on the street -- some of which could help save their lives.A $3 million contract has been awarded for the purchase of 160 mobile data work stations, one for each car in the city on regular patrol.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 20, 2010
Charles Casey, a former pastor who used to live in Maryland, is suing Best Buy and its Geek Squad computer repair service for allegedly making negligent repairs on his computer, which caused it to shock him severely as soon as he plugged his printer into it, according to a federal lawsuit filed yesterday in Maryland. Casey, who lived in Cockeysville, Md., but now lives in Florida with his wife, said in the lawsuit that as soon as he plugged it in, he suffered "a severe electric shock that ran through his body, with tingling in his right hand up to his shoulder, across his tongue and down his left arm. " Casey had presented his computer for repair in early September 2007 to the Geek Squad at the Best Buy in the 1700 block of York Road in Timonium, the lawsuit states.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Letter writer Thomas F. McDonough has it all wrong ("Social Security boondoggle proves conservatives' point," July 29). Not so long ago, the Social Security Administration was faced with a similar programming embarrassment. There was a scandal involving losing people's records. What was happening was that each of the national programming centers and the headquarters here in Maryland had their own individual tracking systems that worked by reading a punch card kept in a pocket in the file at each location the file passed through.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Two weeks after the Social Security Administration received a report criticizing management for a dysfunctional, $300 million computer system, agency officials provided only a cursory summary of the findings at a meeting of a committee overseeing the project, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. According to minutes from a June 17 steering committee meeting, agency officials provided limited detail about the report - noting only one of its recommendations, for instance. That lends credibility to claims by congressional Republicans that top officials at the Woodlawn-based agency delayed releasing its full details.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 27, 2014
The following is compiled from police reports from the Towson and Cockeysville precincts. Our policy is to include descriptions when there is enough information to make identification possible. An intruder stole a computer and jewelry from a residence in the 6200 block of Falls Road, after kicking in a rear kitchen door to gain entry, police reports state. According to the report, the intruder entered the home between 8:30 a.m. and 1:54 p.m. ransacked several rooms stole the items and fled.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Baltimore Police plan to purchase 300 new computers for their nine police district stations, a long-needed upgrade that officials said will allow officers to work quicker and better use technology to fight crime. The agency did not provide information on how much the upgrades will cost, how the purchase is being funded, or what type of machines it is buying. Since his arrival in 2012, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts has said repeatedly that the department's equipment is well beyond its expiration date, in some cases more than 20 years old. In a news release, the agency said the older machines "do not have the capability to run modern programs used in law enforcement.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
I don't know if it was poor reporting by The Sun or poor accounting by Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance, but in an article about technology in schools you recently wrote that Mr. Dance would "pay for the computers in part by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced" ( "Baltimore County school board OKs $205 million technology contract," March 11). I'm not a bookkeeper, but I can't recall when the act of evaluating ever helped pay for anything.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
When some kids hear the hallowed words "snow day" in advance of Monday's storm, they'll grab their coats and sleds and head outdoors. But Maryvale Preparatory School senior Elizabeth Piet, like a growing number of students across the Baltimore region, will power up her iPad to see what assignments her teachers have waiting. Both private and public schools are turning traditional snow days into cyber days that sometimes require students to use the Internet and email to stay connected to their teachers, allowing educators to stick more closely to lesson plans during a winter that's included more severe weather than usual.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | December 15, 1994
When the phone rang on a Sunday afternoon at his home, the week's anxiety would begin for John Seaman.As an assistant principal at Westminster High School, he was in charge of finding substitute teachers."
NEWS
September 16, 1992
Officials in President Bush's drug war came to Towso yesterday to examine a new weapon -- a computer that plots Baltimore County's worst drug neighborhoods.They left impressed."This is a very positive approach to using technology to help limited resources go further," said Severin L. Sorensen, a special assistant in the Office of National Drug Control Policy at the White House.The computer program, called the Substance Abuse Tracking System (SATS), takes the locations of drug arrests and complaints, and areas with the most people in drug treatment programs, and converts the information into maps county officials use to direct enforcement and treatment efforts.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
The adults who trek to Goucher College every Saturday are worlds away from the social media-savvy students who teach them things as simple as how to turn on a computer or use a mouse. Some who visit the Futuro Latino Learning Center, which draws around 70 participants each week, are improving their English skills with help from dozens of Goucher students. Others have been there long enough that they have become de facto community leaders, sharing the news on immigration reform, language workshops and job fairs.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 16, 2014
This article has been updated to reflect the correct field for visual arts professor Eric Smallwood.  Thirty years ago, U.S. colleges and universities awarded 37 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees to women. Today, when that number should be approaching 50 percent, it has actually been cut in half. Women in the United States now receive just 18 percent of computer science bachelor's degrees, and less than a quarter of professionals in computing are women. It's true that women in technology are increasingly well known.
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