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By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 17, 1994
If you're looking over the brochures for on-line information services that came with your new computer or modem, you may feel a bit overwhelmed.Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.
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NEWS
June 18, 2013
What I find most surprising about this whole NSA data mining operation is not that the government is doing it, because I expected that all along. What surprises me is that anyone had any delusions that privacy existed at all any more. Individual privacy disappeared years ago. I worked for an Internet startup when the World Wide Web was just starting and "Internet" meant CompuServe and the many similar BBSs (bulletin board systems). I sat at a terminal monitoring the traffic through our server, which consisted of everyone's private chats, emails and pictures, and I came to two conclusions: Everyone with a computer was using it to cheat on their spouse, and everyone is secretly bisexual.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh | July 5, 1999
Want a computer but don't have much cash? No problem!Taking a cue from magazines who lavish cheap calculators and other freebies on subscribers, online service CompuServe is going one step further and offering its subscribers "free" PCs.The catch -- and you knew there had to be one -- is that CompuServe, a subsidiary of America Online, is offering its free PC in the form of a $400 mail-in rebate. To get the cash, you must sign up for three years of service at $21.95 a month and buy your PC through computer retailers CompUSA, Circuit City or Best Buy. Budget PC maker eMachines is also offering the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh | July 5, 1999
Want a computer but don't have much cash? No problem!Taking a cue from magazines who lavish cheap calculators and other freebies on subscribers, online service CompuServe is going one step further and offering its subscribers "free" PCs.The catch -- and you knew there had to be one -- is that CompuServe, a subsidiary of America Online, is offering its free PC in the form of a $400 mail-in rebate. To get the cash, you must sign up for three years of service at $21.95 a month and buy your PC through computer retailers CompUSA, Circuit City or Best Buy. Budget PC maker eMachines is also offering the deal.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 29, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- H&R Block Inc. said yesterday that it has postponed the spinoff of its remaining stake in CompuServe Corp., gambling that the money-losing unit will be able to stem customer defections to cheaper Internet services.The company said it still intends to separate CompuServe from its tax-preparation business. The first step is boosting the unit's stock: Since H&R Block sold a 20 percent stake in an initial public offering in April, CompuServe's shares have plunged 56 percent.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 18, 1997
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- CompuServe Corp. said yesterday that President and Chief Executive Officer Robert Massey has resigned, effective immediately.Massey's duties will be assumed by Chairman Frank Salizzoni while the company searches for a replacement for Massey. Salizzoni is president and chief executive of H&R Block Inc., which owns about 80 percent of the online service company.The move comes as CompuServe, a pioneer in the online industry, has lost market share to industry rivals America Online Inc. and Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1996
In a further sign that the Internet is becoming the standard format for computer-based communication, the online service CompuServe Inc. announced yesterday that it would abandon its use of proprietary software and adopt the language of the World Wide Web.Bob Massey, CompuServe's president and chief executive officer, said the move to an open standard would let the online service improve current services and allow it to quickly add new capabilities and...
BUSINESS
August 31, 1994
Compuserve plans Internet serviceCompuserve Inc., one of the world's largest commercial information services, said yesterday that it planned to become a global service provider for businesses and individuals wanting to connect to the Internet.The company, a division of H&R Block based in Columbus, Ohio, already has the computer network infrastructure in place to compete in the small but rapidly growing business of providing Internet access, said Maury Cox, president and chief executive of Compuserve.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 24, 1995
If you've been reading a lot about the World Wide Web but don't know how to find it, there's a new on-ramp that should make access much easier.The Compuserve Information Service has added a Web browser to its software, giving existing and new customers a quick and painless route to the Internet's most exciting and fastest-growing feature.Prodigy subscribers have had Web access for more than a month, and Compuserve's move leaves America Online as the only service among the Big Three without a Web Browser.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | January 28, 1991
If you have a relatives or friends serving in the Persian Gulf the fastest way to send them mail may be with your computer.Three of the major on-line information services, Prodigy, Compuserve and GEnie, offer free electronic mail delivery to servicemen and women in the Gulf.Typically, they forward your messages electronically to Saudi Arabia, where they're printed, stuffed into envelopes and delivered to military postal authorities.The services claim that mail sent this way can reach the recipient in as little as three days, compared to weeks through regular air mail channels.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
America Online Inc., the world's largest Internet access service, announced yesterday that it will raise its flat monthly rate 10 percent to $21.95, cut 500 jobs and shake up its organizational structure.Wall Street applauded the changes, sending the company's stock up a whopping $12 to $110.50 in heavy trading."I think the Street was very surprised to see the rate increase, because the Internet service providing industry has seen the opposite trend -- companies undercutting each other to gain subscribers," said Frederick W. Moran, managing director of the New York investment banking firm Furman Selz LLC.Moran said this shift reflects the maturation of the industry.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | September 14, 1997
The Justice Department announced last week that it would review America Online's plan to acquire 2.6 million CompuServe Corp. subscribers in a three-way, $1.2 billion deal with WorldCom.If approved, the deal would eliminate one of America Online's biggest competitors and result in 60 percent of Americans gaining access from home to the Internet through America Online.The government must review the deal by law to ensure that it will not result in higher prices or a monopoly.Considering the loss of competition and the increase in subscribers and service, is there something in the deal that the department should be looking at?
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | September 14, 1997
IMAGINE that you're a connoisseur of fine foods. One night you walk into your favorite French restaurant and learn that it's been taken over by McDonalds."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks advanced yesterday after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan signaled that interest rates probably will remain steady, boosting optimism that corporate profits will rise.Greenspan said the economy continues to grow without inflation -- unlike previous expansions -- probably because new products such as computers are enhancing productivity.The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 12.77 to 7,835.18. Chevron Corp. led the gains, rising $2.3125 to $80.6875 after Prudential Securities told investors the stock was a "buy."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 18, 1997
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- CompuServe Corp. said yesterday that President and Chief Executive Officer Robert Massey has resigned, effective immediately.Massey's duties will be assumed by Chairman Frank Salizzoni while the company searches for a replacement for Massey. Salizzoni is president and chief executive of H&R Block Inc., which owns about 80 percent of the online service company.The move comes as CompuServe, a pioneer in the online industry, has lost market share to industry rivals America Online Inc. and Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 29, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- H&R Block Inc. said yesterday that it has postponed the spinoff of its remaining stake in CompuServe Corp., gambling that the money-losing unit will be able to stem customer defections to cheaper Internet services.The company said it still intends to separate CompuServe from its tax-preparation business. The first step is boosting the unit's stock: Since H&R Block sold a 20 percent stake in an initial public offering in April, CompuServe's shares have plunged 56 percent.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
America Online Inc., the world's largest Internet access service, announced yesterday that it will raise its flat monthly rate 10 percent to $21.95, cut 500 jobs and shake up its organizational structure.Wall Street applauded the changes, sending the company's stock up a whopping $12 to $110.50 in heavy trading."I think the Street was very surprised to see the rate increase, because the Internet service providing industry has seen the opposite trend -- companies undercutting each other to gain subscribers," said Frederick W. Moran, managing director of the New York investment banking firm Furman Selz LLC.Moran said this shift reflects the maturation of the industry.
NEWS
By Tribune Media Services | February 25, 1996
Here are a few highlights of this week's on-line activities:Monday1 p.m. Dr. Neil Tyson, astrophysicist, on America Online. Explore Mars and other planets with Princeton U. scientist. Location: vTC Scholastic Network. Keyword: Coliseum7 p.m. Charles Handy, "Beyond Certainty" author, on America Online. Discuss changing worlds of corporations. Location: Business Week. Keyword: Odeon8 p.m. Beth Witrogen McLeod, eldercare expert, on CompuServe. Discuss caring for elderly parents with San Francisco Examiner reporter.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1996
In a further sign that the Internet is becoming the standard format for computer-based communication, the online service CompuServe Inc. announced yesterday that it would abandon its use of proprietary software and adopt the language of the World Wide Web.Bob Massey, CompuServe's president and chief executive officer, said the move to an open standard would let the online service improve current services and allow it to quickly add new capabilities and...
NEWS
By Tribune Media Services | February 25, 1996
Here are a few highlights of this week's on-line activities:Monday1 p.m. Dr. Neil Tyson, astrophysicist, on America Online. Explore Mars and other planets with Princeton U. scientist. Location: vTC Scholastic Network. Keyword: Coliseum7 p.m. Charles Handy, "Beyond Certainty" author, on America Online. Discuss changing worlds of corporations. Location: Business Week. Keyword: Odeon8 p.m. Beth Witrogen McLeod, eldercare expert, on CompuServe. Discuss caring for elderly parents with San Francisco Examiner reporter.
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