Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCompulsive Gambling
IN THE NEWS

Compulsive Gambling

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | December 5, 2003
WHETHER GAMBLING can be addictive and whether there is increased addiction when people gamble on slots and engage in casino-style gambling is a perennial question among policy-makers. The issue, as generally understood by the public, is whether there is a phenomenon called "compulsive gambling" that makes some people literally unable to stop gambling. The difficult fact to face for those who believe in and those who "treat" compulsive gambling is that, as with all enjoyable activities, there are those who do not exercise self-control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
For America's 6 million compulsive gamblers, the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble, according to research published this week. The new research represents the latest effort to control the biology of misbehavior at a time when celebrity poker, online gambling, lotteries and sports betting have helped to make obsessive wagering a national psychiatric disorder.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The number of compulsive gamblers rose by more than a million adults during the gambling boom of the past two decades, a new comprehensive study shows.A Harvard Medical School study estimates that 3.8 million adults in the United States and Canada suffer from serious gambling disorders, an increase of more than 1.6 million since casinos and lotteries exploded across America."People will learn that if they continue to gamble, they will eventually lose," said Howard Shaffer, a Harvard psychology professor who led the study.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005
Loss of gambling has positive effects In response to John Eisenberg's column on Thursday - in which he wrote "The endless slots debate has killed Maryland as a major horse racing state" - let's ponder a few of the good things that grow out of any reduction/prevention of big-time slots gambling facilities. 1. The state's economy will be healthier, since huge amounts of cash will be spent on services and goods from local businesses that otherwise might have gone to fattening the fortunes of outside gambling interests.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
For America's 6 million compulsive gamblers, the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble, according to research published this week. The new research represents the latest effort to control the biology of misbehavior at a time when celebrity poker, online gambling, lotteries and sports betting have helped to make obsessive wagering a national psychiatric disorder.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1990
Dr. Robert L. Custer, a psychiatrist who in 1974 established the nation's first clinic for treatment of compulsive gambling, died of lung cancer Tuesday at his home in Bethesda. He was 63.Dr. Custer launched a treatment program for compulsive gamblers at the Taylor Manor psychiatric center in Ellicott City in 1983.He was widely recognized as a pioneer in helping compulsive gamblers.At a time when out-of-control gambling was widely considered to be merely aberrant behavior, he came to regard it as a disease that should be treated as such.
NEWS
October 20, 1995
IN THE long-standing debate over whether gambling casinos should be permitted in Maryland, The Sun has consistently argued that communities which tolerate casinos will experience a marked decline in their quality of life and the creation of a new population of compulsive gamblers. In Maryland, invariably the latter argument involves citing a 1990 study purporting to demonstrate the dangers and costs of ''compulsive gambling in Maryland.''That study, invoked by The Sun in its Oct. 1 editorial, ''An apple in the Garden of Eden'' is cited as evidence that the introduction of gambling would mean the creation of tens of thousands of ''compulsive gamblers.
NEWS
By Melissa Grace and Melissa Grace,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 3, 1995
The National Council on Problem Gambling has moved its headquarters from New York City to Columbia in an effort to gain influence in Washington, 25 miles away from the new Town Center office.The offices at One Mall North at the intersection of Little Patuxent and Governor Warfield parkways will also house a 24-hour national 800-number hot line for troubled gamblers and be the headquarters for the council's efforts to increase awareness about the problems associated with compulsive gambling.
NEWS
September 25, 1995
Adoption not as easy as indicatedThe Sept. 10 article by Patrick Fagan, "For sake of kids in foster care, remove bureaucratic bars to adoption," was a strange and frustrating mix of truth, ignorance and outlandish exaggeration. He has identified a real problem: Maryland routinely has more than 1,400 children in foster care waiting for adoption, but only 400 are adopted annually.Keep in mind that the children under consideration have experienced severe deprivations and challenges from a variety of causes, such as pre-natal drug exposure, extreme poverty, transient and sub-standard living conditions, lack of adequate food, health care or parental supervision and physical and sexual abuse.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 6, 1992
Every day, Diane wakes up with the urge to gamble.As a teen-ager in the 1940s, she made side bets on pool games. In her 20s, she discovered the race track, making $150 on her first $2 bet. Then in her 40s, she found the poker machines."
NEWS
December 13, 2003
Ask gamblers if compulsion is a mere myth At first blush, Richard Vatz's assertion that compulsive gambling is a myth appears convincing ("The compulsive gambling myth," Opinion Commentary, Dec. 5). We believe, correctly, that most individuals are able to exercise good judgment when indulging in gambling, whatever their game of choice. But to maintain that compulsive gambling is a myth by virtue of the absence of "legitimate" symptoms is inaccurate. While both the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and the American Psychiatric Association's (APA)
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | December 5, 2003
WHETHER GAMBLING can be addictive and whether there is increased addiction when people gamble on slots and engage in casino-style gambling is a perennial question among policy-makers. The issue, as generally understood by the public, is whether there is a phenomenon called "compulsive gambling" that makes some people literally unable to stop gambling. The difficult fact to face for those who believe in and those who "treat" compulsive gambling is that, as with all enjoyable activities, there are those who do not exercise self-control.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Valerie Lorenz says she wishes that Maryland lawmakers who are considering legalizing slot machines could sit in her chair for a while and hear firsthand the stories of lives ruined and families destroyed by gambling addiction. "We have slots addicts here all the time who have lost their entire businesses ... slots addicts who have stolen hundreds of thousands of dollars to feed their addictions," said Lorenz, who heads the nonprofit Compulsive Gambling Center Inc. in Baltimore. Those numbers are certain to swell if Maryland brings in casino-style gambling, Lorenz said, adding that the state needs to be prepared to set aside at least $2 million to $3 million a year to treat problem gamblers.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Every month, compulsive gamblers from Maryland call a telephone hot line pleading for help. Their sad stories come in from nearly every major gambling venue in the nation -- Atlantic City, Dover Downs, Las Vegas, Pimlico. But the operators fielding the pleas can offer very few options for help in Maryland. "When the state runs a help line, you have to have places to send people," said Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, which administers the phone line.
NEWS
By Amy S. Rosenberg and Amy S. Rosenberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 20, 2000
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Problem gamblers trying to beat their addiction may soon be able to ban themselves from entering casinos in New Jersey. Under a regulation proposed by the state Division of Gaming Enforcement, anyone placed on the so-called "self-exclusion list" would be taken off casino mailing lists and denied credit, check-cashing privileges, club programs and "comps" -- complimentary food, lodging, show tickets and other perks routinely handed...
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | February 6, 2000
Today, pieces of columns-- Anne Arundel County has its quirks. There's the satirical Maritime Republic of Eastport, an Annapolis neighborhood that has "seceded" from the mainland to become a sovereign nation. MRE calls its city council representative an ambassador to Annapolis, which it calls Westport. There's County Executive Janet S. Owens, a smoker from a long line of tobacco farmers,who officially supports anti-smoking campaigns -- and supports them staunchly. And there's commercial bingo.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
Former Washington County Circuit Judge Paul W. Ottinger, whose disappearance in 1987 opened the book on a woeful tale of deceit and desperation, died Friday of a rare blood disorder at a Baltimore center for compulsive gamblers.Mr. Ottinger, 78, died of myelodysplaspic syndrome with severe anemia at Harbour Center in the 900 block of E. Baltimore St. The facility houses the Compulsive Gambling Center, which operates a residential treatment program for gambling addicts.Mr. Ottinger became the center's first and most prominent resident when he turned to the facility for court-ordered therapy.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
Every month, compulsive gamblers from Maryland call a telephone hot line pleading for help. Their sad stories come in from nearly every major gambling venue in the nation -- Atlantic City, Dover Downs, Las Vegas, Pimlico. But the operators fielding the pleas can offer very few options for help in Maryland. "When the state runs a help line, you have to have places to send people," said Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, which administers the phone line.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The number of compulsive gamblers rose by more than a million adults during the gambling boom of the past two decades, a new comprehensive study shows.A Harvard Medical School study estimates that 3.8 million adults in the United States and Canada suffer from serious gambling disorders, an increase of more than 1.6 million since casinos and lotteries exploded across America."People will learn that if they continue to gamble, they will eventually lose," said Howard Shaffer, a Harvard psychology professor who led the study.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
As millions and millions of dollars pour through slot machines at Delaware's three racetracks, one disturbing trend emerges. Since the first machines opened last year at Delaware Park, calls to the state's gambling crisis center have more than doubled."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.