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Compulsion

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NEWS
May 24, 1993
Maryland is getting the worst of everything from its decisio to heavily promote its keno electronic numbers game. The new game is sapping other lotteries of revenue and is coming up woefully short in meeting its own revenue goals. Even worse, keno has created new gambling addicts -- Marylanders who can't control their spending on this state-sponsored activity.For these individuals the state's latest venture into legalized gambling is fomenting tragedy. In just four months, 35 anguished callers have telephoned the hot line set up by the National Center for Pathological Gambling in Baltimore to get help with their keno binges.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
Milford Mill boys basketball coach Albert Holley begins knocking out his checklist the night before a big game. The clothes are washed and neatly folded. The dishes are clean, and the kitchen's granite countertop is free of fingerprint smudges. The rest of the house is just as spotless. In the morning, he feels the need to stick around until his wife leaves for work and their two daughters are off to school, making sure no last-minute messes are left behind. As he heads to the front door, Holley passes through the foyer where the frills on the rug have to be perfectly straight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | March 31, 2005
Address: www.virtual-bub blewrap.com What's the point?: If you feel the compulsion to pop bubble wrap (you know who you are), this site lets you do so, without driving your neighbors batty with the sound (provided you wear headphones). The site times how long it takes you to pop a whole sheet of wrap, with high scores and everything. (And for extra stress relief, try "manic mode," though this doesn't help your score.) What to look for: Check out the "Methods" link to find out tons of new ways to pop bubble wrap in real life.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Here's one piece of paper that those who hoard should be encouraged to hang onto — a list of resources for those who compulsively collect. •For a comprehensive overview of the history, symptoms and diagnosis of hoarding, check out the International OCD Foundation's hoarding page at http://www.ocfoundation.org/hoarding. •For a hands-on self-help guide, many therapists recommend the book "Buried in Treasures: Help for Compulsive Acquiring, Saving, and Hoarding," by David Tolin, Randy Frost and Gail Steketee.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 1, 2007
"There's dead and then there's dead," quipped Kevin Costner as a Coast Guard swimmer in The Guardian. He could have used that line in the inflated suspense film Mr. Brooks. He plays the title character, a serial killer with a double life and double standards. The successful owner of a chic Portland, Ore., box company, with a comely wife (Marg Helgenberger) and a smart, pretty daughter (Danielle Panabaker), he knows he kills out of compulsion - he goes to AA meetings and confesses he's an addict.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 28, 2002
Portraits 9 / 11 / 01: The Collected "Portraits of Grief" from The New York Times, foreword by Howell Raines and introduction by Janny Scott (Times Books, 688 pages, $30). The last publication in which most readers would have expected to find an exquisiteness of microjournalism is The Times. Yet day after day from shortly after the World Trade Center horror for 14 weeks and then episodically afterward, there were one or two full pages of tiny pieces about victims. For some people I know, the miniature obituaries became a compulsion -- they literally could not get through the day without reading some or all of them.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The minuet of modern liberalism -- the dance of a doctrine in decline -- continues. Having become unpersuasive, and hence uneasy in political arenas, liberalism dabbles at democracy but increasingly relies on litigation rather than legislation to achieve its ends.In Hawaii, where 70 percent of the residents oppose same-sex marriages, a judge has decided to redefine marriage, and hence society's molecular unit, the family. He says the state is violating the state constitution's equal-protection guarantee because there is no ''compelling'' reason to ''discriminate'' against homosexuals by not licensing same-sex marriages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2003
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - The arguing began the instant professor May Sim finished charting "man's journey from being uneducated to being educated," as she summed up the philosophical position she had staked out. Someone asked if she really thought the human soul could come to know Truth? Wouldn't it blink at the last moment, like an eye blinded by the sun's radiance? Someone else sputtered that Plato, Sim's intellectual hero, was just plain wrong about the erotic dimension of learning. One participant half playfully accused another of being a "neo-atomist" - that is, of regarding reality as being composed of tiny bits of soul-less matter.
NEWS
By Stan Lichtenstein | January 15, 1991
TODAY I choose to write about "choice" -- no, not "choice" as in pro-choice vs. pro-life, but choice as the basic principle that should govern the most significant aspects of living free in a free society. You may ignore what I have to say, if you choose.My preachments on this subject are prompted by various political phenomena apart from the abortion rights controversy, and especially by the current "anti-incumbency" fever manifested in moves to limit terms of office so that no one will be re-elected "too many" times.
NEWS
By William Safire | November 16, 1993
ED ROLLINS, the political manager who out-strategized White House guru James Carville in the recent New Jersey gubernatorial, reminds me of the mentalist in the old movie "The 39 Steps": When asked a question, he is compelled to blurt out the dangerous truth.His need to expose the existence of what pols have long called "walking-around money" -- henceforth to be known in the annals of psychiatry as Rollins' Compulsion -- has provided the healthiest revelation in politics this year. To the victor belongs the spoiler.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2011
The table in Jack Samuels' Fells Point office is piled two feet high with books, papers, scientific journals and grant applications. Samuels' wife likes to tease him that he has a hoarding problem, just like the people he studies. In reality, those stacks of paper might hold a remedy. Samuels, an associate professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, is the go-to guy nationwide for researchers seeking to understand the biological basis of hoarding — an intense, irrational drive to collect items in vast quantities, coupled with an inability to discard even objects that are worthless or broken.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 1, 2007
"There's dead and then there's dead," quipped Kevin Costner as a Coast Guard swimmer in The Guardian. He could have used that line in the inflated suspense film Mr. Brooks. He plays the title character, a serial killer with a double life and double standards. The successful owner of a chic Portland, Ore., box company, with a comely wife (Marg Helgenberger) and a smart, pretty daughter (Danielle Panabaker), he knows he kills out of compulsion - he goes to AA meetings and confesses he's an addict.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
For America's 6 million compulsive gamblers, the long odds are on a pill. In the largest clinical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Minnesota found that daily doses of an experimental drug called nalmefene, often used to treat alcoholism, appeared to curb the craving to gamble, according to research published this week. The new research represents the latest effort to control the biology of misbehavior at a time when celebrity poker, online gambling, lotteries and sports betting have helped to make obsessive wagering a national psychiatric disorder.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | August 16, 2005
NEW YORK - Sun worshipers often joke that they're junkies when it comes to catching rays, but a new study suggests there might really be something addictive about tanning. The study's Texas-based researchers asked 145 randomly selected beach-goers at Galveston Island to answer questions adapted from two surveys typically used to screen for alcohol and substance dependence. The surveys included such questions as, "Do you try to cut down on the time you spend in the sun, but find yourself still sun tanning?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | March 31, 2005
Address: www.virtual-bub blewrap.com What's the point?: If you feel the compulsion to pop bubble wrap (you know who you are), this site lets you do so, without driving your neighbors batty with the sound (provided you wear headphones). The site times how long it takes you to pop a whole sheet of wrap, with high scores and everything. (And for extra stress relief, try "manic mode," though this doesn't help your score.) What to look for: Check out the "Methods" link to find out tons of new ways to pop bubble wrap in real life.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | March 13, 2005
Apparently, many Americans think chronic overspending is humorous. Bumper stickers bear such catchphrases as "Born to shop" and "Shop till you drop." But for some, the lighthearted banter stops when out-of-control spending rips apart relationships and plunges consumers into overwhelming debt and bankruptcy. Up to 8 percent of Americans, 23.6 million people, suffer from compulsive shopping disorder, according to a Stanford University study. And about one-quarter of Americans have a compelling need to purchase that hasn't become destructive, according to other estimates.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 19, 2002
In 1924, two brilliant teen-agers, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, planned and committed a murder as an intellectual game. Their case popularized the use of the phrase "thrill killers" and inspired several movies, most famously Compulsion (1959), starring Bradford Dillman, Dean Stockwell and Diane Varsi as a sympathetic girl. With Ryan Gosling, Michael Pitt and Agnes Bruckner in parallel roles, Murder By Numbers is a new-millennial California update. The killers here are high-school students, not college grads, but like Leopold and Loeb they want to pull a perfect crime to prove they're superior to society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- A lot of actors say they choose their roles based on their gut or their heart or their need to "stretch creatively." A lot of actors say they don't think about the big paycheck or the marketing or the awards (even as their agents kill themselves procuring the big paycheck, the marketing and the awards). Kevin Bacon is more precise. He says he has taken three things off the list of his requirements for a role: the size of the role, the size of the movie and the size of the salary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2005
HOLLYWOOD -- A lot of actors say they choose their roles based on their gut or their heart or their need to "stretch creatively." A lot of actors say they don't think about the big paycheck or the marketing or the awards (even as their agents kill themselves procuring the big paycheck, the marketing and the awards). Kevin Bacon is more precise. He says he has taken three things off the list of his requirements for a role: the size of the role, the size of the movie and the size of the salary.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2004
She would bolt upright in bed, hours before dawn, and jot her thoughts on tiny yellow sticky notes. She would scribble on her arm while bicycling home from the hospital where she worked. Dr. Alice W. Flaherty simply could not stop writing. After the death of her premature twin boys several years ago, the Boston neurologist lapsed into a postpartum mood disorder that prompted a peculiar syndrome: She was all but overtaken by the urge to write. And write. And write. "I woke up one morning and I had a huge amount of energy.
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