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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
Margaret Pardoe is ready to go.On Oct. 1 the 20-year veteran of the comptroller's office will leave the state payroll two years earlier than she had planned to devote more time to tending her garden, visiting her son in Georgia and playing with her nine grandchildren -- "not necessarily in that order."Pardoe is taking advantage of an early retirement program that is expected to entice about 2,600 state workers to sign up by the deadline Saturday.The General Assembly authorized the early retirement incentives this year as part of the Glendening administration's plan to shave about 1,800 positions from the state work force.
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NEWS
September 1, 2009
In 1987, Maryland launched its "one and only" tax amnesty holiday for those who hadn't paid their state taxes. Shockingly, in 2001 it happened again, and yesterday Gov. Martin O'Malley and others were in Dundalk touting Maryland's third such effort in 22 years. What do all three events have in common? Here's a clue: It's all in the timing. At the time of each, Maryland was in the throes of an economic downturn, and elected officials desperately needed the cash to help balance a state budget awash in red ink. This year's effort may prove to be the most desperate yet. Unlike in 2001, the General Assembly approved the amnesty last spring without giving the state comptroller's office any money to manage, advertise or market it. And that's one reason why even the legislature's own analysts are assuming it will raise about $10 million compared with nearly four times that amount eight years ago. Tax amnesty is not necessarily a bad policy, at least not in moderation.
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NEWS
September 10, 1991
With only two days to go until Thursday's primary election in Baltimore City, reality is beginning to sink in. Barring unforeseen upsets, City Council incumbents are likely to be re-elected in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Districts. In contrast, tight contests have developed over Democratic nominations in the First, Second and Third districts.Understandably, the mayoral race has captured most of the attention. It has been an odd spectacle. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's decision to wage a low-profile campaign has made it difficult for the two other major Democrats, Clarence H. "Du" Burns and William Swisher, to raise issues or create enthusiasm.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com and gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
State officials are considering a $366 million budget fix that could spare difficult spending cuts by transferring money in an unused reserve fund kept by the Maryland comptroller's office. The fund is maintained for accounting purposes and could go a long way to reducing a $1.9 billion shortfall that Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers must close to balance the next annual budget. O'Malley, a Democrat, is considering various ways to pare the budget he will submit to the General Assembly that convenes next week.
NEWS
April 30, 1992
Leave it to the Maryland General Assembly to make a relatively simple situation hopelessly complex. Take the matter of taxes. Come Friday morning, the state's 5 percent sales tax will be applied to numerous items in a way that will confuse plenty of consumers and businesses. No wonder the state comptroller's office feels overwhelmed.On May 1, Marylanders will see the tax on cigarettes rise 20 cents per pack, and the tax on gasoline rise a nickel per gallon. That's the easy part to remember.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 1997
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- NationsBank is the first bank to request new powers under an expanded regulation of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.The Charlotte bank's two applications last week will be the first test of a revised OCC rule that allows banks, on a case-by-case basis, to do things that previously were forbidden.Some bankers have speculated that the comptroller's office, which regulates national banks, eventually could approve applications by banks to underwrite insurance and securities.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1999
Continuing to broaden the scope of his new job, Maryland Comptroller William Donald Schaefer has invited local officials to bring him their problems.The invitation, sent in a Feb. 17 letter to leaders across the state, was open-ended."
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court refused yesterday to hear a claim by a former Baltimore official, Ronald A. Brown, that Jacqueline F. McLean set out illegally to purge white men from her office after she became city comptroller in late 1991.McLean was elected comptroller in November 1991 and took office in December. Brown lost his job as administrator of city telephone facilities the next July.Brown contended in a lawsuit that he lost his job because of an affirmative action program that targeted white men. But lower federal courts rejected his claim, saying no evidence linked a reorganization of the comptroller's office -- and Brown's termination -- to the program.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens, who has been hinting at a congressional bid for months and recently bought a new home that makes her a resident of Maryland's 3rd Congressional District, now says she is also considering a run for state comptroller. Owens, 62, has long stated her interest in the state office - but only if the incumbent, fellow Democrat William Donald Schaefer, decided against running for a third term. A two-term county executive who cannot seek re-election, Owens has concentrated for months on pursuing a congressional seat that will be vacated by Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat who is running for U.S. Senate.
NEWS
June 21, 2007
Treasury to intercept taxes from vendors State and federal contractors have a new reason not to fall behind on their taxes: Their next payment for government work could be garnished. The state has started working with the U.S. Treasury Department to collect back taxes from companies that do business with the government, Comptroller Peter Franchot said yesterday. Under the reciprocal program, the state intercepts federal vendor payments and takes the amount owed in taxes before the rest of the payment is passed on to the company; the federal government does the same with state contract payments to collect federal taxes owed.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | December 4, 2008
Bi-monthly Board of Public Works meetings have been sparring grounds for Gov. Martin O'Malley and Comptroller Peter Franchot, but yesterday the sharp-tongued tax collector issued rare kind words for his political rival from Baltimore. "I ... want to salute the governor," Franchot said. The reason for Franchot's decorousness: O'Malley was voting to approve an $87 million software upgrade that the comptroller's office says will yield hundreds of millions of dollars in uncollected taxes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peterhermann@baltsun.com | September 6, 2008
Authorities raided a corner bar in Southeast Baltimore yesterday and seized three video gaming machines that police said were used for illegal gambling, part of an effort by the Maryland Comptroller's Office to crack down on such devices in taverns and liquor establishments across the state. Baltimore police vice detectives carrying a pry bar and a sledge hammer walked into the Colonial Inn at Eastern Avenue and Washington Street, ordered a handful of patrons to leave and seized the machines and $1,753.
NEWS
July 10, 2008
Fortunately for Baltimore's anti-smoking efforts, the concept of legal pre-emption just got pre-empted by the state comptroller. At issue was whether the city - or any other local government, for that matter - can restrict the sale of little cigars or "blunts" to packs of five or more. The goal of Mayor Sheila Dixon's proposal is to help keep them out of the hands of youngsters who tend to buy them individually. Last week, a lawyer in Comptroller Peter Franchot's office wrote a letter warning that the concept didn't pass legal muster.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | June 27, 2008
State prosecutors have subpoenaed records from the Maryland comptroller's office, suggesting that the long-standing investigation into City Hall might involve state taxes. Two people involved in the investigation - Mayor Sheila Dixon's former campaign chairman and the owner of a company that hired her sister - have pleaded guilty to tax charges since the probe began in 2006. Comptroller Peter Franchot's office received the subpoena several weeks ago and has complied with the request, but a spokesman for the office would not provide any details about what the subpoena sought.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | October 23, 2007
Perhaps they should have been tipped off by the fact that the comptroller's office isn't open on the weekends, or that you can't get a tax refund if you don't pay your taxes. Either way, 40 people wanted on criminal warrants trekked to Annapolis on Saturday to claim a phony tax refund and left in handcuffs. In what could be considered the Publisher's Clearinghouse Sweepstakes of police stings, the Anne Arundel County Sheriff's Office sent letters to 500 people this month, announcing that a computer glitch meant there was a $572.
NEWS
October 12, 2007
Cracking down on state tax evaders ought to be a top priority, particularly when Maryland is facing a $1.7 billion budget deficit. After all, every dollar collected from an unpaid tax bill is a dollar less in new taxes or budget cuts. So Comptroller Peter Franchot's recent announcement that his office could clear as much as $200 million within the next four years - if he can expand his staff, pay them a bit more, and upgrade technology - deserves serious consideration. So why is the O'Malley administration acting so cool to the idea?
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 23, 1994
SIMON SAYS:People who snore on airplanes should be checked as baggage.*Has anyone ever aged better than James Garner?*Like many people, I received a tax refund check from the State of Maryland recently, (yes, if you have silverfish, they can be deducted as dependents) and also got a little pamphlet enclosed with the check titled: "1994 Maryland Terrapin Football."This pamphlet urged me to buy Terps tickets, travel with the team to Clemson and join the Terrapin Club, which has a scholarship fund for "student-athletes."
NEWS
February 5, 1998
Taxpayers may get free help with their federal and state income tax returns tomorrow at two Baltimore offices.Internal Revenue Service and Maryland comptroller's office personnel will be in the lobby of the State Office Building in the 300 block of W. Preston St. and in the lobby of the Fallon Federal Building in Hopkins Plaza.The service will be available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the State Office Building and from 8: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the federal building.More than 200 taxpayers visited the offices when the service was provided Monday, according to state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
NEWS
June 23, 2007
A Washington County man was arrested yesterday for trying to sell cigarettes over the Internet, a practice that has been illegal in the state since 2005, the Maryland comptroller's office announced. Agents with the comptroller's office found an online ad for the cigarettes and set up a meeting with the suspected seller, James Kevin Morgan. It's the first time someone has been arrested in Maryland by comptroller's agents for trying to sell cigarettes over the Internet, the comptroller's office said.
NEWS
June 21, 2007
Treasury to intercept taxes from vendors State and federal contractors have a new reason not to fall behind on their taxes: Their next payment for government work could be garnished. The state has started working with the U.S. Treasury Department to collect back taxes from companies that do business with the government, Comptroller Peter Franchot said yesterday. Under the reciprocal program, the state intercepts federal vendor payments and takes the amount owed in taxes before the rest of the payment is passed on to the company; the federal government does the same with state contract payments to collect federal taxes owed.
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